How to build a brand positioning statement

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A brand positioning statement focuses on the consumer target your brand will serve and the emotional and functional benefits your brand will stand for.

brand positioningIf you don’t position your brand the way you want, then your customers and competitors will do it for you, and you might not like their answers. A smart brand positioning statement should narrow the target to those consumers who are most capable of loving what the brand does. With your consumer in mind, your brand positioning should find the ideal balance between functional and emotional benefits.

There are 4 elements that make up a brand positioning statement, including who will you serve, where you play, where will you win and why consumers should believe you. These are the consumer target, category, main consumer benefit and support points:

1. Who is the consumer target?

What slice of the population is the most motivated by what your brand offers? Do not just think about who you want, but rather who wants your brand.

2. Where will you play?

What is the competitive set that defines the space in the market your brand competes in? Positioning is always relative to who you compete against. For instance, a brand is never fast, it is faster.

3. Where will you win?

What is the main promise you will make to the consumer target, that will make your brand stand out as interesting, simple, unique, motivating and own-able? Do not talk about what you do (features). Talk about what the consumer gets (functional benefits), and how the brand makes them feel (emotional benefits).

4. Why should they believe us?

Understand what support points and features are needed to back up the main promise. Moreover, these support points should close any potential doubts, questions or concerns the consumer has after hearing the main promise.

Classic Brand Positioning Statement

Before you just randomly write out a brand positioning statement based on your intuition, I will force you to think deeper to focus your decisions on the best possible space for your brand to win and own.

Who is the consumer target market?

The 7 key questions to define the consumer target market:

  1. What is the description of the consumer target market?
  2. What are the consumer’s main needs?
  3. Who is the consumer’s enemy that torments them every day?
  4. What are the insights we know about the consumer?
  5. What does the consumer think now?
  6. How does the consumer buy?
  7. What do we want them to see, think, do, feel or whisper to their friends?

One of the biggest mistakes I see Marketers make is when they pick too big of a consumer target market. A smart target market not only decides who is in the target but who is not in the target. There is this myth that a bigger consumer target will make the brand bigger, so the scared Marketer targets ‘everyone’. There seems to be an irrational fear of leaving someone out. Spreading your brand’s limited resources across an entire population is completely cost-prohibitive. While targeting everyone “just in case” might feel safe at first, it is actually riskier because you are spreading your resources so broadly, that you never see the full impact you want to see. This broad consumer target gives your brand a lower return on investment and eventually will drain your brand’s limited resources. Please focus.

Consumer or Customer Profile

The Consumer Benefits Ladder

The Consumer Benefits Ladder helps turn your brand’s features into consumer benefits. You should stop thinking about what your brand does and start thinking about what your consumer gets. This will help your positioning statement come alive.

Consumer Benefits Ladder The 4 steps to build a Consumer Benefits Ladder:

  1. Leverage all available research to brief the team, helping define the consumer target profile with consumer insights, need states and the consumer enemy.
  2. Brainstorm all the possible brand features that your brand offers, plus any brand assets. Make sure that these features give your brand a competitive advantage.
  3. Move up to the functional benefits by putting yourself in the shoes of the consumer and for each feature on your list, ask “so if I am the consumer, what do I get from that?” Challenge yourself to come up with better benefits by asking the question up to 5 times, pushing the answers into a richer zone.
  4. Then move up to the emotional benefits by looking at each functional benefit and then ask “so if I am the consumer, how does that make me feel?” As you did in step 3, keep asking the question until you see a deeper emotional space that you can play in and own.

What are the functional benefits?

To help Brand Leaders, I have taken the 9 functional need state zones shown earlier in this chapter and expanded the list to over 50 potential functional benefits that you can build around. As you look through the list, gravitate to the functional benefits you think will fit the needs of your consumers, and where your brand can do it better than competitors. Start with my words and layer in your own creative language with the specific category or consumer language.

Functional Benefits

 

What are the emotional benefits?

Below you will find a list of 40 potential emotional benefits help build an emotional brand positioning statement. From my experience, Marketers are better at the rational benefits than they are at the emotional benefits. I swear every brand thinks their brand should be the trusted, reliable and yet likable. As a brand, you want to own one emotional space in the consumer’s heart as much as you own the rational space in the consumer’s mind. When I push Brand Managers to get emotional, they struggle and opt for what they view as obvious emotions, even if they do not fit with their brand.

Emotional cheat sheet

I have used Hotspex research methodology to create a ‘cheat sheet’ with 8 major Emotional Consumer Benefits, that includes optimism, freedom, being noticed, being liked, comfort, be myself, be in control and knowledge. To own a space in the consumer’s heart, brands should own and dominate one of these zones, always thinking relative to what zone your competitor may own. Do not choose a list of emotions from all over the map, or you will confuse your consumer. Use the supporting words to add flavor to your emotional brand positioning statement.

How to write brand positioning statement Emotional Benefits

 

Sorting through the benefits

When you conduct the benefits brainstorm on your brand, use the Consumer Benefits Ladder worksheet to focus the team’s thinking. Like any brainstorm, you will end up more choices than you can use. Here is an example of the output of a Consumer Benefits Ladder worksheet for Gray’s Cookies.How to write brand positioning statement Consumer Benefits ladder

 

Narrow down the list by sorting through the benefits to find those that are the most motivating to consumers and own-able for your organization.

Market Research Benefit claim sort

Support points to the main benefit

I took one logic class at University and the only thing I learned was ‘premise-premise conclusion’. Easy class, but the lesson has stuck with me:

  • All fish live in water (premise)
  • Tuna are fish (premise)
  • Therefore, tuna live in the water (conclusion)

In a brand positioning statement, the main consumer benefit is the conclusion, with a need for two support points as the premises. The reason to believe (RTB) should never be the conclusion. If pure logic teaches us that two premises are enough to draw any conclusion, then you only need two RTBs. Brands that build concepts with a laundry list of RTBs are not doing their job in making focused decisions on what support points are needed. With consumers seeing 5,000 advertising messages per day, having a long list of support points, risks having a cluttered mess in their brand communications. Claims can be an effective tool in helping to support your Reason to believe.

There are 4 types of claims you can use on your brand: process, product, third person and behavioral.

Process Support

  • How your product works differently
  • Showcase what you do differently within the production process
  • What added service/details do you provide in the value chain

Product Claims

  • Usage of an ingredient that makes you better
  • Process or ingredient that makes you safer

Third person endorsement

  • Experts in the field who can speak on your behalf.
  • Past users/clients with the proof support of their stories.

Behavioral Results

  • Clinical tests
  • In market usage study
  • Before and after studies

How to put the Brand Positioning statement together

After doing all the homework, now you can put together a winning Brand Positioning Statement that addresses:

  1. Who is your consumer target? Keep the target focused. Do not be vague in your definition. Never go after two segments at the same time. Bring the target to life with need states, consumer insights, and a consumer enemy.
  2. Where will you play? Define the space you play in, against those brands you compete against. Which competitor do you fight against for the same dollars?
  3. Where will you win? Narrow your benefit down to one thing. Never try to stand for too many things at once—whether too many functional benefits or too many emotional benefits. You cannot be all things to all people. Make sure you talk benefits, not features. Find the ideal space that is unique and motivating to the consumers, while being own-able for your brand.
  4. Why should they believe us? The role of support points is to close off any potential doubts the consumer might have when they see the main benefit. Watch out that these are not just random claims or features that you want to jam into your brand message. They should support and fit with the main benefit.

How to write brand positioning statement classic fundamentals

Here is our training workshop we run to help brand leaders define your Brand Positioning Statement:

These slides are from our brand management training program. With our Brand Positioning training, we will show you how to come up with the target market, consumer benefits, both functional and emotional, as well as support points.

To learn more about this type of thinking, you should explore my new book, Beloved Brands.

With Beloved Brands, you will learn everything you need to know so you can build a brand that your consumers will love.

You will learn how to think strategically, define your brand with a positioning statement and a brand idea, write a brand plan everyone can follow, inspire smart and creative marketing execution and analyze the performance of your brand through a deep-dive business review.

Beloved Brands book

To order the e-book version or the paperback version from Amazon, click on this link: https://lnkd.in/eF-mYPe

If you use Kobo, you can find Beloved Brands in over 30 markets using this link: https://lnkd.in/g7SzEh4

And if you are in India, you can use this link to order: https://lnkd.in/gDA5Aiw

Beloved Brands: Who are we?

At Beloved Brands, our purpose is to help brands find a new pathway to growth. We believe that the more love your brand can generate with your most cherished consumers, the more power, growth, and profitability you will realize in the future.

We think the best solutions are likely inside you already, but struggle to come out. Our unique playbook tools are the backbone of our workshops. We bring our challenging voice to help you make decisions and refine every potential idea.

We start by defining a brand positioning statement, outlining the desired target, consumer benefits and support points the brand will stand behind. And then, we build a brand idea that is simple and unique enough to stand out in the clutter of the market, motivating enough to get consumers to engage, buy and build a loyal following with your brand.

We will help you write a strategic brand plan for the future, to get everyone in your organization to follow. It starts with an inspiring vision that pushes your team to imagine a brighter future. We use our strategic thinking tools to help you make strategic choices on where to allocate your brand’s limited resources.

Our brand playbook methodology will challenge you to unlock future growth for your brand

  1. Our deep-dive assessment process will give you the knowledge of the issues facing your brand, so you can build a smart plan to unleash future growth.
  2. Find a winning brand positioning statement that motivates consumers to buy, and gives you a competitive advantage to drive future growth.
  3. Create a brand idea to capture the minds and hearts of consumers, while inspiring and focusing your team to deliver greatness on the brand’s behalf.
  4. Build a brand plan to help you make smart focused decisions, so you can organize, steer, and inspire your team towards higher growth.
  5. Advise on advertising, to find creative that drives branded breakthrough and use a motivating messaging to set up long-term brand growth.
  6. Our brand training program will make your brand leaders smarter, so you have added confidence in their performance to drive brand growth.

To learn more about our coaching, click on this link: Beloved Brands Strategic Coaching

To learn more about our training programs, click on this link: Beloved Brands Training

If you need our help, email me at graham@beloved-brands.com or call me at 416 885 3911

You have my personal promise to help you solve your brand building challenges. I will give you new thinking, so you can unlock future growth for your brand.

Signature

Graham Robertson

Founder and CMO, Beloved Brands Inc.

 

 

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Graham Robertson

Graham Robertson is one of the voices of today's brand leaders. As the founder of Beloved Brands, he has been a brand advisor to the NFL Players Association, Shell, Reebok, Acura, Jack Links and Pfizer. He's helped train some of the best marketing teams on strategy, brand positioning, brand plans and advertising. Graham's purpose is to use is marketing experience and provocative style to get marketers to think differently about their brands, and to explore new ways to grow. Graham spent 20 years leading some of the world's most beloved brands at Johnson and Johnson, Coke, General Mills and Pfizer, rising up to VP Marketing. Graham played a significant role in helping win Marketing Magazine's "Marketer of the Year" award. He has won numerous advertising and innovation awards including Businessweek’s best new product award. As a keynote speaker, Graham shares his passion for brands to challenge and inspire marketing minds around the world, whether speaking at Advertising Week, or at the NBA Summer League, or to a room full of marketers in Bangkok Thailand or an agency in New York. He's been a guest writer for Ad Age, and his weekly blog stories have reached millions of marketers, who are trying to improve their skills. His new book, Beloved Brands, has launched with rave reviews. Many brand leaders are using this book as a playbook to help build the brand they work on. And, it serves as a brand management textbook for business schools in the US, Canada and the UK. Graham’s personal promise is to help you solve your brand building challenges, to give you new thinking, so you can unlock future growth for your brand.

18 thoughts on “How to build a brand positioning statement”

  1. Hi Graham! I am a fan of brands like you!
    I wanted to print this post but it does not print the A4 pages. Could I find another way so I can keep your article in my files?
    Thank you
    G.

  2. Hi Graham, I love your write ups on all the different aspects of Branding. Concise, to the point and explained in simple terms. I’m currently helping an upscale real estate developer client position their brand new luxury residences. Crafting a Brand Strategy for a new brand is a double edged sword. There are no preconceived negative notions, so one could build a brand based on the tangible attributes (location, premium quality product, luxurious setting, etc)… But of course it’s ultimately the customers who will decide whether the brand resonates w/ them. Your posts were helpful indeed.

  3. Great Information. Something that looks difficult to do and execute, simply explained and direct to the point. Thanks Graham!

  4. Great post – what you say or imply is not what Rosser Reeves – the man who first developed the USP concept – said in his book ‘Reality in Advertising’. He said that a USP is about about the product, it is tangible and that to be unique it can’t be shared by any other product. I think that the concept of the USP is so limited that it ought to be archived.

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