Nail your next next job interview with your 7-second & 30-minute personal brand pitch!">Nail your next next job interview with your 7-second & 30-minute personal brand pitch!

Nail your next next job interview with your 7-second & 30-minute personal brand pitch!

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in How to Guide for Marketers

A typical marketing job interview starts with you waiting in the lobby longer than you wanted. Then the big introduction, the handshake, that awkward small-talk on the way to the tiny little room where all you can think to talk about is the weather or you finding a great parking spot. Then you sit down, and out comes that dreaded question, “So, tell me about yourself”. Oh god well all hate that question. “Ummmm, let me see, I like basketball, walks in the park and I think I’m rather funny, or at least my wife does”. Wow, bad start. Then you get about 8-10 questions that ask “tell me a time when…”. And finally, they end the interview with, “Anything else to add?” Then there is that awkward walk back to the reception desk, where you talk about your plans for the weekend. Then you drive home, and realize that you forgot to mention your 3 biggest career accomplishments.

The problem is you didn’t know how to answer “so, tell me about yourself” because you never know a great way. Well I will show you how. Then you waited defensively on the 8-10 “Tell me a time when….” type behavioral questions everyone is using. You sat there like a game show contestant hoping that examples will miraculously pop into your head at the last minute. Well, I am going to show you how to organize the 10 best things you ever did so that never happens again. And, you were so relieved at the end of the interview, that when they said “Anything to add?” you mistakenly let out a big sigh and said: “No, I think we are good!” That’s no way to end it. This is like the end of the TV ad, where you forget your tagline. Instead, I am going to force you to go for the close with your 7 second pitch again!

Having interviewed about 1,000 marketers over my 20 year career, I can tell you that many of the best marketers in the world kinda suck in job interviews. They forget that when they are looking for their next role….that THEY are now the brand they must be able to market. The same rules apply.

Marketing 101 would suggest that you have to map out your strengths to what they are looking for. Your winning zone is to find that clear difference that matters to employers. Avoid the losing zone where your peers are better than you and the dumb zone where no one cares. Where it is a tie, the risky zone, you can win that through your experience or bringing your values into the mix. But you need to fin your winning zone.

Nail your next next job interview with your 7-second & 30-minute personal brand pitch!

So tell me about yourself: Deliver your 7-second pitch

“As a brand leader, I find growth where others couldn’t, and I create a motivated brand team that delivers great work to drive results”.

Think of this like your 7 second personal brand pitch, where you give a summation of your personal brand’s big idea. Here is a simple tool I have created to help you answer:

  • What is the shortest way that you define yourself.
  • What is the primary benefit you will provide your next employer?
  • What is the secondary benefit you will provide.
  • Then wrap it up with an expected result.

Nail your next next job interview with your 7-second & 30-minute personal brand pitch!

Look at your resume and then start off by brainstorm as many options for each of the 4 areas as you can. This is a great way to assess yourself based on what you have done over the last few years. Make sure your definitions are more forward looking with an aspiration for what you want to be, not what you have been.

Nail your next next job interview with your 7-second & 30-minute personal brand pitch!

Once you get that done, you can then begin to piece it all together and see what your own 7-second pitch might start to look like. Keep tightening that pitch until it flows. In my 20 years of CPG marketing, I became the turnaround guy, so “I could find growth where others couldn’t” became my little hook. What is yours?

Nail your next next job interview with your 7-second & 30-minute personal brand pitch!

Expand your 7 second pitch up to a 30-minute pitch

Once you feel comfortable with your 7 second pitch, take each of those 4 statement areas and try to come up with 2-3 examples and stories from your past that can prove and demonstrate. These examples help define your 30-minute pitch:

Nail your next next job interview with your 7-second & 30-minute personal brand pitch!
Now you have 10 stories you can use to bring into your interview to answer any of the “so tell me a time when…” questions. If these are your best 10, then you should refer to these to help demonstrate your big idea. This is also a great page that you can be looking at when you are sitting in the reception area, just prior to your interview.

So here’s how the interview should go:

  • “So tell me about yourself”: Deliver your 7-second pitch.
  • The 8-10 interview questions: Deliver any of the 10 examples from your 30-minute pitch.
  • “Anything to add?”: Repeat your 7 second pitch as your closing line.

Nail your next next job interview with your 7-second & 30-minute personal brand pitch!

This way, you are now controlling up front how you want to define yourself. All 8-10 examples will help add to that definition. And as you get to the end, you wan to use a 7-second close to re-affirm your big idea.

Later on, as the various interviewers re-group to discuss each person, you hope your big idea sticks in their head. “I really like Bob, because he could turn this brand around. He has done it before. He gets results”.

You can use this 7-second pitch that top of your resume, your descriptor for your LinkedIn profile, your handshake introduction at networking meetings, or within the body of any emails that you send looking for jobs. The more you use it, the more you begin to make this your reputation.

One last tip. If you are in Marketing and can’t think of a safe “what’s your weakness”, I can tell you mine. “I’m not very good at negotiations.” The reason it is safe, is that most marketing jobs don’t really require any negotiations. If you’re reading this and you’re not a Marketer…then I guess your safe answer might be: “I’m not really good at marketing”.

Good luck to you. I hope you get what you are looking for.

At Beloved Brands, we can’t really help you get a job. But once you do land that dream job in Marketing, we can certainly help you succeed. What we do best, is we make Brand Leaders smarter so they can produce exceptional work that drives stronger brand results. We offer brand training on every subject in marketing, related to strategic thinking, analytics, brand planning, positioning, creative briefs, customer marketing and marketing execution.

We can help you come up with your brand’s Brand Positioning, Big Idea and Brand Concept. We also can help create Brand Plans that everyone in your organization can follow and helps to focus your Marketing Execution. We provide a new way to look at Brand Management, that uses a provocative approach to align your brand to the sound fundamentals of brand management.

To contact us, email us at graham@beloved-brands.com or call us at 416-885-3911. You can also find us on Twitter @belovedbrands. And please feel free to add me on LinkedIn.

 

Beloved Brands Graham Robertson

 

 

How good is your marketing team? Find their score.">How good is your marketing team?

How good is your marketing team? Find their score.

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in How to Guide for Marketers

While there are a lot of marketing specialists these days, the best brand leaders should be a generalist, who are strong on analytics, strategic thinking, defining the brand, leading the brand plan and inspiring smart execution. I see it as a continuous cycle, where you analyze, think, define, plan and execute, each time making adjustments based on the marketplace. These are the 5 major elements you need to run a brand.

How good is your marketing team?

 

How good is your marketing team?

Using those 5 major elements, I have broken down each into 4 key skills a marketer must have, for a total of 20 skills. I have provided definitions for you to think about when assessing your own team.

How good is your marketing team?

 

I would encourage you to do a evaluation using our scorecard to see how your team stacks up against your own expectations. This may help you to identify any of the potential gaps on your team, that are lingering in the back of your mind. For each element, try to score your team from 1 to 5, where a score of 5 means they are exceptional at that element, then a 4 means they are very strong, a score of 3 says they are solid performers, a 2 would mean they fall below your own expectations and a 1 means they are unable to perform that skill. Once you have completed the evaluation, you can provide an overall score to identify how well you are doing–unless they score in the 80 or 90% zone they likely need help. Not only that, their performance is likely holding back the performance of your brand.

How good is your marketing team?

How to make your team smarter

Smarter thinking starts with the analytics and strategy choices, that will lead into a smarter definition of your brand and the brand plan  that everyone will follow. Smarter people on your team will lead to better marketing execution that will have a direct impact on your brand’s performance.

How to do brand analytics 

Brand Leaders must be able to turn data into analytical stories that leads to better strategy choices. We show how to build a deep-dive business review on the brand, looking at the category, consumers, competitors, channels and brand.

  • We start with the smart analytical principles that will challenge your thinking and help you gain more support by telling analytical stories through data.
  • We teach you the steps to complete a deep-dive Business Review that will help assess the health and wealth of the brand, looking at the category, consumer, competitors, channels and brand.
  • We show key formulas you need to know for financial analysis.
  • We teach how to turn your analysis into a presentation for management, showing the ideal presentation slide format. We provide a full mock business review, with a framework and examples of every type of analysis, for you to use on your own brand.
  • We show you how to turn your analytical thinking into making projections by extrapolating data into the future.

 

How to think strategically

Brand Leaders must be able to slow down their brains to ask questions before they go looking for solutions. Strategic Thinking is an essential foundation to ask big questions that challenge and focus their decisions.

  • We teach Brand Leaders how to think strategically, to ask the right questions before reaching for solutions, mapping out a range of decision trees that intersect and connect by imagining how events will play out.
  • We take Brand Leaders through the 8 elements of good strategy: vision, opportunity, focus, speed, early win, leverage and gateway. We introduce a forced choice to help Marketers make focused decisions.
  • We teach the value of asking good questions, using five interruptive questions to help frame your brand’s strategy. This helps to look at the brand’s core strength, consumer involvement, competitive position, the brand’s connectivity with the consumers and the internal situation the brand faces.
  • We show how to build strategic statements to set up a smart strategic brand plan.

 

How to define your brand

Brand Leaders must be able to find a winning brand positioning statement that sets up the brand’s external communication and all the work internally with employees who deliver that promise.

  • We show how to write a classic Brand Positioning statement with four key elements: target market, competitive set, main benefit and reason to believe (RTBs).
  • We introduce the Consumer Benefit ladder, that starts with the consumer target, with insights and enemies. We layer in the brand features. Then, get in the consumers shoes and ask “what do i get” to find the functional benefits and ask “how does this make me feel” to find the emotional benefits.
  • We introduce a unique tool that provide the top 50 potential functional and top 40 emotional benefits to help Marketers stretch their minds yet narrow in on those that are most motivating and own-able for the brand.
  • We then show how to build an Organizing Big Idea that leads every aspect of your brand, including promise, story, innovation, purchase moment and experience.

 

How to write a Brand Plan everyone can follow

A good Brand Plan helps make decisions to deploy the resources and provides a road map for everyone who works on the brand

  • We demonstrate how to write each component of the Brand Plan, looking at brand vision, purpose, values, goals, key Issues, strategies and tactics. We provide definitions and examples to inspire Marketers on how to write each component. We provide a full mock brand plan, with a framework for you to use on your own brand.
  • We offer a workshop that allows Marketers to try out the concept on their own brand with hands on coaching with feedback to challenge them. At each step, we provide the ideal format presentation to management. We offer unique formats for a Plan on a Page and long-range Strategic Road Maps.
  • We show how to build Marketing Execution plans as part of the overall brand plan, looking at a Brand Communications Plan, Innovation Plan, In-store plan and Experiential plan. This gives the strategic direction to everyone in the organization.

 

How to inspire Marketing Execution

We show Brand Leaders how to judge and decide on execution options that break through to consumers and motivates them to take action.

  • The hands-on Creative Brief workshop explores best in class methods for writing the brief’s objective, target market, consumer insights, main message stimulus and the desired consumer response. Brand Leaders walk away from the session with a ready-to-execute Creative Brief.
  • We provide Brand Leaders with tools and techniques for judging communication concepts from your agencies, as well as processes for making decisions and providing effective feedback. We talk about the crucial role of the brand leader in getting amazing marketing execution for your brand.
  • We teach how to make marketing decisions with the ABC’S, so you can choose great ads and reject bad ads looking at tools such as Attention (A), Branding (B), Communication (C) and Stickiness (S)
  • We teach how to provide copy direction that inspires and challenges the agency to deliver great execution. We also talk about how to be a better client so you can motivate and inspire your agency.

 

Time to step up and invest in training your team

The smartest plan for your people is to identify the gap areas and then look through each of the modules to see which one would be best suited to help them. We can certainly customize any program to meet your needs. One of the best ways to drive long-term business results from your brands is to ensure you have a strong marketing team in place. At Beloved Brands, we can develop a tailored program that will work to make your team better. Regardless of industry, the fundamentals of Brand Leadership matter.

In terms of connecting with your people, training is one of the greatest motivators for teams and individuals. Not only do people enjoy the sessions, they see the investment you are making as one more reason to want to stay. They are focused on their careers and want to get better. If you can be part of that, you will retain your best people.

The Training Program can executed to meet your needs whether that’s in:

  • Classroom format or small team training
  • Coaching, either in team setting or one-on-one
  • Mentoring to high potential managers or executives.
  • Skype video or webinar style for remote locations.
  • Lunch and Learn Style

Smarter people will lead to better work and stronger brand performance results

 

Beloved Brands: Who are we?

At Beloved Brands, we promise that we will make your brand stronger and your brand leaders smarter. We can help you come up with your brand’s Brand Positioning, Big Idea and Brand Concept. We also can help create Brand Plans that everyone in your organization can follow and helps to focus your Marketing Execution. We provide a new way to look at Brand Management, that uses a provocative approach to align your brand to the sound fundamentals of brand management.

We will make your team of Brand Leaders smarter so they can produce exceptional work that drives stronger brand results. We offer brand training on every subject in marketing, related to strategic thinking, analytics, brand planning, positioning, creative briefs, customer marketing and marketing execution.

To contact us, email us at graham@beloved-brands.com or call us at 416-885-3911. You can also find us on Twitter @belovedbrands.

Beloved Brands Graham Robertson

 

Oh how I yearn for the “BIG WOW” creative that seems to have left  the world of advertising

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in How to Guide for Marketers

big creative execution neat vs wow

What am I missing? 

I keep looking at a lot of so-called ‘great marketing’ of today, and I think “ok”, but where oh where is the “Big Wow, oh my god I wish I made that stuff!!!”

  • Let me define BIG WOW creative ideas as the work that makes our eyes go wide and we immediately shout out “Wow!” while we secretly think “I want to make that one!!!”
  • Let me also define the “small/neat” creative as little marketing gadgets and tricks that make us say, “Hey, that’s pretty neat”.

The reality is that a brand needs both big and small creative. I have always been a fan of the small neat stuff. When I launched the dishwasher tabs, I created a sell-sheet that used elastic bands to create a 3 dimensional tab once the sel-sheet was open. Apparently, the buyer at our largest customer took that sell sheet around the office showing all the other buyers. But, that’s small/neat stuff. I enjoyed it, but never got overly excited.

Big work is exciting.

After 20 years in Brand Management, I have vivid memories of each time I saw a “BIG WOW” idea for one my brands. I can remember where I was and how it felt. I was also lucky enough to work on some amazing campaigns. I remember one of the creative guys stood up with around 30 boards under his arm for one TV ad, and I wanted to make it after he presented the 9th board. I remember seeing another in this small room that was the top floor of an antique book store. My brand team had mistakenly put in the brief “no funny ads”, yet we left that book store laughing our asses off and made one of the best ads I have ever been part of. I can remember everyone who resisted every idea I ever managed to get on air. There were always more who resisted the truly great work, while sadly, on most of the OK work we were about to make, I always seemed to be the only resistor. That should tell you something.

With all the clutter of small ideas, it seems too many brand leaders think they need lots of small ideas. Pretty soon the media market looks like a cluttered community bulletin boards where every brand is content to just have you grab their phone number.

Are the media choices getting in the way of big creative?

Everyone loves the Oreo tweet in the middle of the Super Bowl. Sure. while the moment was “pretty neat” and likely had the Oreo team giggling, it really is just a small, neat idea that went viral. Everyone giggled and shared it. But is it a Big Wow? Paying a celeb to tweet about your product is pretty cool, but it’s not really big creative. Oreo Super Bowl AdJust cutting a check. A Facebook ad that pops up on the side of your laptop in a “3/4 inch square” is about as exciting as a bench ad outside a bus stop. I am on Twitter all the time. It feels like the modern-day version of junk mail. There’s too much, all telling me I can get stuff for free. Each time I open Twitter, I just see a collection of messy stuff. Do not get me started on SEO sales people. I equate them with air-duct sales people. Maybe I am getting old and I am missing the golden age of great creative.

Oh how I miss those TV ads that offer the ideal combination of sight, sound, story telling. They can make you laugh, give you goosebumps or even make you cry. Maybe, we just in a valley of creativity as we adjust to some of these new media choices. But now, you cannot convince me that most of the work out there is pretty crappy. Sadly, it just bores me.

Are we too fixated on big data proof? 

I once approved a campaign that failed miserably in testing. It was just too different for consumers to truly grasp. But my gut feel said it was the right way to go. The campaign lasted 10 years, and doubled the market share of the brand. Sure, I was scared. It was early in my career and the resistance was incredible. I would have surely been tossed out if it failed. That level of risk/reward excitement never exists on the small stuff. Is there a conflict between taking a chance on something and needing the big data to prove that it is correct? Sometimes your gut feel knows more than the data that reflects the history of work, not the future.

Marketers tense up when the work get “too different”

Great advertising must balance the creativity and smart. Advertising has to be different enough to break through in a cluttered world, yet smart enough to motivate consumers to see, think, feel or act in ways that help the brand. One problem I see for Marketers is they tense up when the creative gets ‘too different’. In all parts of their business, Marketers relax when they can see past proof that something will work. Unfortunately, when it comes to advertising, if the ads start to look like what other brands have already done, then the advertising will get stuck in the clutter.

Marketing Execution Big Smart Ideas Wow

When it gets too familiar, it bores consumers and it will fail to break through. Brand Leaders should actually be scared when the ads seems “too familiar”. You have to push the work and take a chance to ensure your ad breaks through. The advertising must also be smart in delivering the desired brand strategy in moving consumers to see, think, feel or do, while expressing a brand positioning that can form a future brand reputation. The ideal sweet spot is being both smart and different. Smart without different will not even break through the clutter. Different but not smart might be entertaining but will not do anything for the brand. Push yourself to find Smart and Different.

My baseball analogy: “Swing for the fences. It feels amazing”

In baseball, I rarely hit home runs. I was a singles spray hitter. (an Al Oliver wannabe) I likely hit 10 over the fence in 1,000 at bats in my entire life. But I can tell you that as the ball leaves the bat, your hands turn to mush. Oh, what a feeling. Now, that is the level of excitement I want to see from the Big Wow creative. All this small stuff is terrific, but that’s just a bunt single.

I believe the Big Wow ideas will energize a team, give them the guts to take more chances. Creativity is infectious to the spirit of the team. Get your nose out of the charts and look up into the sky.  Find work that will make your hands going mush and make you scream “WOW”.

Show me some big wow stuff that will make my heart beat wildly and make me scream “WOW” again.

To read more about how to create amazing marketing execution, here is our workshop we run:

 

Beloved Brands: Who are we?

At Beloved Brands, we promise that we will make your brand stronger and your brand leaders smarter. We can help you come up with your brand’s Brand Positioning, Big Idea and Brand Concept. We also can help create Brand Plans that everyone in your organization can follow and helps to focus your Marketing Execution. We provide a new way to look at Brand Management, that uses a provocative approach to align your brand to the sound fundamentals of brand management.

We will make your team of Brand Leaders smarter so they can produce exceptional work that drives stronger brand results. We offer brand training on every subject in marketing, related to strategic thinking, analytics, brand planning, positioning, creative briefs, customer marketing and marketing execution.

To contact us, email us at graham@beloved-brands.com or call us at 416-885-3911. You can also find us on Twitter @belovedbrands.

Beloved Brands Graham Robertson

 

The new burger war: 5 Guys vs In-N-Out vs Shake Shack">Five Guys Shake Shack In-N-Out

The new burger war: 5 Guys vs In-N-Out vs Shake Shack

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in How to Guide for Marketers

 

When I was a kid, after my hockey practices, my mom and I used to go to Burger King. It became our tradition. What did i like the best? It was nice and quiet, compared to the crowded noisy McDonald’s right across the street. There were no lines, no one taking up the great seat locations. It was so quiet, it was almost zen. Even today, Burger King remains the place you go if you don’t like crowds.

Today, there’s a new burger war heating up:

  • 5 Guys Burgers
  • In-N-Out Burger
  • Shake Shack

Who will win? It might depend where you live. If you are in California, you may be partial to In-N-Out, if you are a New Yorker, it is Shack Shake for sure. Everywhere else, it looks like 5 Guys is the dominant brand. This is a brand site, so we look at this through the eyes of marketers and consumers, not food critiques. I am also a burger fan.

Who has the best burger?

I know there is a lot of debate out there. Lets dispel the myth here: they are almost the same piece of meat. They take a high quality ground chuck, and squish it firmly onto a grill, use a cooking technique to lock in the flavor and create a juicy burger. It is a much higher quality meat than McDonald’s and much juicier in the end due to the cooking technique.

The only difference is at 5 Guys, the burger feels like the burger actually breaks apart more which could make it feel less fast-food while In-N-Out feels very neatly stacked. I do like the bacon at Five Guys, but In-N-Out does a nicely toasted bun. Small details.

VERDICT:  Tie

Fries versus shakes

5 Guys FriesIf the burger is a relative tie, then what else can you look at. 5 Guys wins on fries, Shake Shack or In-N-Out wins on Shakes.  I’m a big fries fan, and 5 Guys does have pretty darn good addicting fries. They give you enough that you likely won’t finish them.  The In-N-Out fries (except for Animal Fries) are a little bit nondescript and boring. I do like the crinkle cut style Shake Shack fries, but they are frozen, not fresh. In terms of shakes, the In-N-Out shakes are legendary, whereas 5 Guys is completely missing out by not even having a shake. Verdict:  Tie, pick your poison and likely only have it once in a while.  

Who has better atmosphere?

I have to say, neither In-N-Out or Five Guys have a nice atmosphere.  The In-N-Out restaurants have the plastic feel of a McDonald’s, with booths too small to fit those who can eat a double-double. The hats on the employees are cute, giving it a 50’s diner feel. The 5 Guys atmosphere feels like a Costco, with dusty floors, crappy little tables and chairs. Plus, do we really need 50 signs per restaurant telling us how great you are. There is no effort on their store atmosphere. What you are doing is opening up the door to local establishments finding a niche against both of these with a cooler pub-like atmosphere. The Shake Shack locations are much nicer. If you ever get the chance to go to the original Shake Shack in NYC, it is worth it. I was doing some work with an ad agency, and arrived a couple of hours before the meeting. I didn’t feel like going up early and I noticed about 50 people lined up for lunch at this “shack” in the park.  Every time I have Shake Shack whether in Dubai or throughout the US, I still think of the park. A litlte like my first Movenpick experience, 20 years ago, in the middle of the swiss alps. Verdict: Shake Shack

Five Guys Shake Shack In-N-Out

 

Where does In-N-Out Burger win?

Clearly as I’ve heard from the fans, In-N-Out does a great job engaging with their consumers. The secret menu and the secret sauce, the traditions of the double-double and the “animal fries” all help create a “club” filled with brand fans who will take on anyone that knocks their brand.  There’s a slight difference in who each attracts.  In-N-Out’s menu items are generally less expensive — the chain is most popular with young men ages 18 to 24 with an income of less than $70,000 a year, according to NPD. By contrast, Five Guys patrons are generally 25 to 50 years old, with an income of more than $100,000. In-N-Out seems to have a more engaged consumer base that it can leverage as 5 Guys is now into the Southern California market ready to do battle right in the backyard of In-N-Out.t this point, In-N-Out is stuck as a West Coast brand, in California, Arizona, Nevada and now Texas, giving them only 320 locations.  They have not expanded very quickly, believing it is better to be loved by a few than tolerated by many. This gives them a regional strength and more emotional engagement goes to In-N-Out.

Where does 5 Guys win?

5 Guys has been much more aggressive on their expansion plan. They have pursued winning on review sites and lists that can help drive awareness for the brand. In 2010, they won the Zagat best burger. They have aggressively gone after celebrities such as Shaq and Obama. And most of all, they are winning on location, location and even more location.  5 Guys is everywhere, with 1000+ locations, fairly national and even in Canada. They are clearly following the McDonald’s real estate strategy by trying to be everywhere. The other area where 5 Guys wins is pricing. I am a marketer, so the more price you can command the better. For relatively the same burger, 5 Guys charges twice what In-N-Out charges. In this current stagnant economy, people are proving they’d rather pay $10 for an amazing quality burger than $15 for a lousy steak. It feels like In-N-Out is leaving money on the table with the prices that are just slightly above the McDonald’s price points. More aggressive growth goes to 5 Guys. 

Where does Shake Shack win?

They were definitely late the expansion party, with only 120 stores at this point. The NYC location in the park is such a part of their brand, yet it also drives a lot of revenue. At one point, Shake Shack thought they would stay a “New York only brand” which is part of their delay. Right now, the US market is fairly saturated with burger shops, so they now have 30% of their locations overseas including Seoul, Tokyo, London, Cardiff, Istanbul, Moscow, Muscat, Beirut, Dubai, Abu Dhabi, Doha, Kuwait City, Riyadh. Pretty smart strategy to see an opportunity in those markets and close on them before the others could. I would say, the more interesting locations goes to Shake Shack. 

So who will win?  

At this point the clear winner will be 5 Guys. Just like McDonald’s versus Burger King in the original burger war, it’s not as much about the burger itself but about the aggressive pursuit of real estate. Unless In-N-Out wakes up, take all that brand love they have generated among their fans and they go on an 5-year big expansion, they will be relegated to a regional brand we only visit on our road trips to California.

5 Guys is quickly becoming the upscale version of McDonald’s

To read more about how the love for a brand creates more power and profits:

 

Beloved Brands: Who are we?

At Beloved Brands, we promise that we will make your brand stronger and your brand leaders smarter. We can help you come up with your brand’s Brand Positioning, Big Idea and Brand Concept. We also can help create Brand Plans that everyone in your organization can follow and helps to focus your Marketing Execution. We provide a new way to look at Brand Management, that uses a provocative approach to align your brand to the sound fundamentals of brand management. 

We will make your team of Brand Leaders smarter so they can produce exceptional work that drives stronger brand results. We offer brand training on every subject in marketing, related to strategic thinking, analytics, brand planning, positioning, creative briefs, customer marketing and marketing execution. 

To contact us, email us at graham@beloved-brands.com or call us at 416-885-3911. You can also find us on Twitter @belovedbrands

 

Beloved Brands Graham Robertson 

 

 

 

 

How Marketers can be better strategic thinkers">

How Marketers can be better strategic thinkers

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in How to Guide for Marketers

I always joke that strategic people share similar traits to those we might consider lazy, cheap or conniving. Rather than just dive into work, strategic people will spend an extraordinary amount of time thinking of all the possible ways for them to get more out of something, while you exert the least possible effort or waste their own money. After thinking of every possible option, strategic people have this unique talent to make a firm decision on the best way forward. They are great at debate because it appears they already know the other options you might raise, and they already know why that option will not work as well. And, the thing about strategic people, is they get away with it.

How to use smart strategic thinking in Marketing

 

Smart strategic thinkers see the right questions before they look for answers, while instinctual thinkers see answers before they even know the right question.

I see a big difference between strategic thinking and intuitive leaders. Strategic thinkers see ‘what-if’ type questions before they look for potential solutions. Have you ever been a meeting and heard someone say, “That’s a good question”? This is usually a sign someone has asked an interrupting question designed to slow everyone’s brain down, so they take the time to reflect and plan before they act, to force them to move in a focused and efficient way. Strategy is the thinking side of marketing, both logical and imaginative. Strategic people are able to map out a range of decision trees that intersect, to imagine how events will play out in the future. The risk is that if they think too long, they just spiral around, unable to decide. They miss the opportunity window.

How to use smart strategic thinking in Marketing

On the other hand, instinctual leaders just jump in quickly to find answers before they even know the right question. Their brains move fast, they use emotional impulse and intuitive gut feel. These people want action now and get easily frustrated by delays. They believe it is better to do something than sit and wait around. They see strategic people as stuck running around in circles, as they try to figure out the right question. Instead, they choose emotion over logic. This “make it happen” attitude gets things done, but if they go too fast, their great actions may solve the wrong problem. Without proper thinking and focus, an action-first approach might just spread the brand’s limited resources randomly across too many projects. Intuitive leaders can be a creative mess and find themselves with a long to-do list, unable to prioritize or focus.

How to use smart strategic thinking in Marketing

Brand leaders must learn how to change brain speeds.

They must move slowly when faced with difficult strategy and quickly with their best instincts on execution. A brand leader’s brain should operate like a racecar driver, slow in the difficult corners and go fast on the straightaway. You must slow down to think strategically. Did you ever think that the job might get in the way of thinking about how to do your job better? With wall-to-wall meetings, constant deadlines and sales pushes, you have to create your own thinking time.

Find your thinking time

You should block off a few hours each week, put your feet up on the desk, and force yourself to ask really difficult questions. Pick one problem topic for each meeting you book, and even invite a peer to set up a potential debate. The goal is not to brainstorm a solution, but to come up with the best possible question that will challenge the team. Even go for walks at lunch or a drive somewhere just to get away from it all. My best thinking never came at my desk in front of my computer. Too many marketers have their head down in the numbers they miss the obvious opportunities and threats that are right on the horizon. Strategic thinkers should assess, question and consider every element that can impact your business. Here is a simple 4-step process to run a strategic thinking meeting:

  1. Vision: Every brand and even every project should start with a longer-term vision that maps out the ideal state of where you want to go. Push yourself beyond the normal expectations. Always focus on ways to create a bond with your consumers to build a group of brand lovers.
  2. Situation: Brand leaders must know the immediate situation of the brand, so they can constantly analyze and assess the potential changes could happen with consumers, competitors, and channels that could impact the health and wealth of your brand. Without the deep and rich strategic thinking discipline, you risk moving too quickly on brand strategy, unable to see the insights that may be hidden beneath the surface. You solve the wrong problem. It is crucial to use the analysis to know how tight the bond you have created with consumers, to know where your brand sits on the brand love curve.
  3. Key Issues: Brand leaders must understand the issues in the way of the stated vision. This includes the drivers, inhibitors, risks and opportunities. Think of both immediate and longer-term issues. As stated, strategic thinkers see questions before they see solutions. In this process, frame the key issues as an interrupting and challenge question.
  4. Strategic direction: Strategies are answers to the questions that your situational analysis and key issues raised. They are never randomly selected. All this strategic thinking is wasted if you cannot make a decision. You should be an intellectual philosopher not a business leader. Do not tell yourself you are a good decision-maker if you come to a decision point and always choose both. The best brand leaders force themselves to focus. They use the word “or” more than they use the word “and”. Strategic thinkers never divide and conquer out of fear. They force themselves to make choices to focus and conquer.

Learn to change your brain speeds. Go slow with strategy and fast with execution.

To read more on How Marketers can be better strategic thinkers, click on this powerpoint presentation that forms one of our workshops. My hope is that it challenges you to think differently about your own brand situation:

Beloved Brands: We make brands stronger and brand leaders smarter.

We will unleash the full potential of your brand. We will lead a 360-degree assessment of your business, help you define your Brand Positioning, create a Big Idea that will transform your brand’s soul into a winning brand reputation and help you build a strategic Brand Plan everyone who works on the brand can follow.

We will make your team of Brand Leaders smarter so they produce exceptional work that drives stronger brand results. We offer brand training on strategic thinking, brand analytics, brand planning, brand positioning, creative briefs and marketing execution.

To contact me, call me at 416 885 3911 or email me at graham@beloved-brands.com

Beloved Brands Graham Robertson

 

Build your entire brand strategy behind your core strength">Build your entire brand strategy behind your brand’s core strength

Build your entire brand strategy behind your core strength

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in How to Guide for Marketers

What is the core strength that your brand can win on?

To be loved, a brand must know who they are and then stand with pride, conviction and confidence. The problem for many brands is they try to have a few core strengths, so they end up having no real perceived strength that stands out.

This model has four possible options for what core strength your brand should choose to win with: product, brand story, experience or price. For many Marketers, their first response is to want to pick two or three core strengths, but the model forces you to pick just one. Here’s the game I have created to help make the choice. You have 4 chips, you must place one chip where you believe you have the highest competitive advantage to win with, then two chips at the mid level that back up and support the core strength. Finally, the game forces one chip to be at the low, almost a throw-away weakness that will not be part of the strategy.

Build your entire brand strategy behind your brand’s core strength

For Apple, their core strength is their brand story around ‘simplicity’. They support that core strength with a great product and consumer experience. However, they never win on price, charging a price premium and never discount.

Product led Brands

When Product Innovation is your key strength, your main strategy should focus on being better. The brand must invest in continuous innovation to stay ahead of competitors, being the leader in technology, claims and new formats. The brand must defend against any challengers. The promise and experience should be built around the product. The brand should leverage product-focused mass communication, directly calling attention to the superiority and benefit differences in the product versus the competitors. Bring the “how it is built” into the brand story, to highlight and re-enforce the point of difference. Use rational selling to move consumers through the buying stages. Use product reviews and key influencers to support the brand. One watch out for product led brands is the struggle to build and drive an emotional connection with consumers. As the brand matures, it must layer a big idea on top of the product, to enable the consumer to connect on a deeper level. There are some amazing product brands, such as Samsung, Tide, Five Guys or Ruth’s Chris who create consumer loyalty, but still lack that emotional connection.

Rolex has done an amazing job in building emotion into their product led brand. The language choices they use such as ‘crafted from the finest raw materials’ or ‘assembled with scrupulous attention to detail’ helps convey their commitment to the design and production of the Rolex. Rolex epitomizes prestige and success. On marketing program that has helped Rolex create an emotional bond is one they first resisted—the official clock for Wimbledon. Both Rolex and Wimbledon place an enormous emphasis on the values of tradition and excellence. The fact that Rolex is one of the few companies with a presence on the courts is further testament to the strength of the partnership.

Product led brands core strength

Story led Brands

When the Brand Story is your brand’s key strength, the strategy should focus on finding a way to be different. To tell that story, invest in emotional brand communication that connects motivated consumers with the big idea on a deeper emotional level. Then line up everything (story, product, experience) under the big idea. Story led brands should leverage a community of core “brand lovers” who can then talk about the brand story and influence others within their network. These brands should use a soft sell approach to influence the potential consumer. Do not bring price to the forefront, as it can take away from the idea. Some of the store-led brands includes Dove, Nike, W Hotels and Virgin, the greatest story-led brand has been Apple.

Most recently, the Tesla brand appears to have borrowed a lot of Apple’s principles, building around the story of “saving the planet with innovation”. Tesla uses many innovative approaches, including the visionary charm of their founder, Elon Musk, to create a movement beyond a brand. He has become a spokesperson for a generation of consumers who want to save the planet. Even the most ardent Tesla brand lovers see the brand as a movement. The 400,000 consumers who put down $1,000 for a car that does not yet exist are pretty much investing in the movement, more than the car.

Idea led brand core strength

Consumer experience led Brands

When the Consumer Experience is your brand’s lead strength, the strategy and organization should focus on linking culture very closely to your brand. Your people are your product. As you go to market, be patient in a slower build as the quick mass media approach might not be as fast or efficient. Invest in influencer and social media that can help support and spread the word of your experience. Effective tools include word of mouth, earned media, social media, on-line reviews, use of key influencers and testimonials. Use the brand purpose (“Why you do what you do”) and brand values to inspire and guide the team leadership. Align the operations team with service behaviors that deliver the brand’s big idea. Focus on building a culture and organization with the right people, who can deliver incredible experiences. Invest in training the face of the brand. Too much marketing emphasis on price can diminish the perceived consumer experience. Some of the best experience brands includes Ritz-Carlton, Emirates airline, Airbnb, Amazon, Netflix and Starbucks.

In a blind taste test, Starbucks coffee finishes middle of the pack. Starbucks view themselves as in the ‘moments’ business. They build everything around the consumer experience. The brand stresses the importance of the culture with their staff and use service values to deliver incredible guest experiences. Starbucks offers the perfect moment of escape between home and work, supported by a unique combination of Italian coffee names, European pastries, cool friendly staff, nice leather seats and indie music that creates an amazing atmosphere that cannot be beat.

Price led Brands

When Price is your brand’s lead strength, focus on driving efficiency to drive the lowest possible cost structure. These brands should use ‘call to action’ Marketing to keep high turns and high volume. It is all about cash flow with fast moving items that delivers high turns and high volume to cover off the lower prices. Invest in the fundamentals around production and sourcing to maintain the low cost competitive advantage. Use the brand’s power to win negotiations. Price brands need to own the low price positioning and fiercely attack any potential challengers. The brand usually needs good solid products, however consumers are willing to accept a lower consumer experience. Many price brands struggle to drive any emotional connection with consumers brand. It can be hard to maintain ‘low price’ while fighting off the perception that the brand is ‘cheap’. It is hard for consumers to love the price brands, even though they rely on them when needed. Walmart is one of the best price brands. No one is more efficient at retail. While their competitors sell through their inventory in 100-125 days, Walmart sells through theirs in 29 days, 1 day before they even have to pay for it. Their outward sales pitch is price, but their internal organization and culture is clearly driven by driving efficiency with fast-moving items. They use their power to bully their suppliers, who give in just to be part of Walmart’s high sales volumes. Walmart has made failed attempts to create any emotional connection. The battle in the future for Walmart will be Amazon, who does extraordinary customer service and smart pricing. It will be a tough battle for Walmart as Amazon is one of the most beloved brands on the planet.

Build your entire brand strategy behind your core strength

As you take this model a step further, this should guide your overall brand positioning angle on whether you should strive to be better, different or cheaper. The product led brands should be building a story around how they make it better than everyone else, while the story led brands can tell the story, idea or purpose behind the brand. As you move to the experience, the focus should be on how the people make the brand different and finally, while you can just yell price, you might be much more effective if you tell the story behind how you can offer the same as others at a much lower cost.

Build your entire brand strategy behind your core strength

Brands that cannot decide which of the four to build around will find themselves in trouble. Trying to be everything to anyone is the recipe for being nothing to everyone. A great case study example is Uber. You could argue for all 4 possibilities. And while you might think that is game-changing, I think it is dumb. Uber has squeezed the prices on taxis so low that they are squeezing their own margins so low. Plus, they believe the way to win is saturating the market to dominate it before anyone else can enter. Let’s play that out a bit. If you have been using Uber quite a while, you will notice that the quality of drivers is going way down. I have had friends say their driver showed up in a cut off tank top, got lost 2-3 times and definitely did not have a shower this morning. That is risk of trying to be a price brand because that is the quality driver that Uber can afford. Then along comes Lyft, who focuses primarily on the consumer experience. Same app, higher price level, and a driver who is fully trained with higher standards. They emphasis quality experience to their drivers and their consumers, thereby boxing Uber into being a price brand longer term. By not focusing on the experience position, Uber left it open for someone else to grab. The profit squeeze then hits, even cheaper drivers and then Uber could end up the Walmart of taxi cabs.

Pick one strength. Build everything you do behind it.

To read more on how to create a beloved brand, click on this powerpoint presentation that forms one of our workshops. My hope is that it challenges you to think differently about your own brand situation:

 

Beloved Brands: We make brands stronger and brand leaders smarter.

We will unleash the full potential of your brand. We will lead a 360-degree assessment of your business, help you define your Brand Positioning, create a Big Idea that will transform your brand’s soul into a winning brand reputation and help you build a strategic Brand Plan everyone who works on the brand can follow.

We will make your team of Brand Leaders smarter so they produce exceptional work that drives stronger brand results. We offer brand training on strategic thinking, brand analytics, brand planning, brand positioning, creative briefs and marketing execution.

To contact me, call me at 416 885 3911 or email me at graham@beloved-brands.com

Beloved Brands Graham Robertson

 

 

How influencer marketing helps break through the clutter">Marketing Influencers

How influencer marketing helps break through the clutter

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in How to Guide for Marketers

 

Influencer marketing is not new. But, it is substantially better with today’s social media world.

Pre-social media, I launched a confectionary product, where we sent samples (in the mail) to every captain of the high school football team, every head-cheerleader and every student body President. It worked like a charm. Within the first month of our launch, we were the #1 brand in the mint category. No competitors saw it coming. I am not even sure we did.

I have to tell you that as a former VP marketing, I used to reject any brief or plan that said “drive awareness”.  It was my pet peeve. I only earn my salary if the brand makes money. Last I checked, we don’t make any money from awareness. So I used to ask one simple question: “So if we get awareness, what do we get next?”. I would get various answers but I would try to steer them towards:  “Well, I hope it tempts the consumer to want to try our brand”. I’d then hand back the brief and say “Put that as the objective then”.

Awareness is a crappy objective. Awareness has no movement. I can buy awareness. As a marketer, my marketing must have some type of action–to get consumers to think, feel or do–differently than before they saw our marketing. I want marketing that has movement and that creates a bond, whether an immediate one or over time.

Influencer Marketing breaks through the clutter

Sure, influencer marketing does drive awareness, but when done right, it drives awareness with an action. The best influencer marketing has a finger wagging at the consumer–telling them what to think, feel or do–without the consumer really even knowing. The world is cluttered. There is more marketing crap out there than ever. Doing a TV ad or digital ads just adds more clutter to the crap we sift through on a daily basis. Aligning to an influencer who the consumer is willing to listen to helps break through and accelerate our brand’s potential for success

Brands are now all about relationships

No longer should a brand think about their consumers in a strictly functional or logical way. The best brands of today capture the imagination of their consumers and take them on a journey of delightful experiences that fosters a deeper emotional and lasting relationship. These brands treat their most cherished consumers with a respect that establishes a trust, that enables consumers to open up to a point where thinking is replaced with feelings, the logic of demand evolves into an emotional state of desire, needs become cravings and repeat purchases progress into rituals that turns into a favorite moment in the day. Consumers become outspoken and loyal brand fans.

Influencer Marketing breaks through the clutter

 

The pathway to brand success is now all about building relationships

The best brands of today engage in a strategy that follows a very similar path to the rituals of a courtship. Through the eyes of consumers, brands start as complete strangers and if successful, they move into something similar to a trusted friendship. brand love curve relationshipsAs the consumer begins to open up, they allow their emotions to take over and without knowing, they begin to love the brand. As the brand weaves itself into the best moments of the consumer’s life, the consumer becomes an outspoken fan, an advocate and one of the many ‘brand lovers’ who cherish the brand. From the strategic mind of the marketer, this follows a very similar pattern to the strategies of a successful courtship. The brand could move into a position where the consumer sees it as a forever choice.

To replicate how brand building matches up with the building of a relationship, I have created the Brand Love Curve, as consumers move through five stages including unknown, indifferent, like it, love it and onto the beloved brand status. This Brand Love CurveBrand Love Curve is an anchor used throughout the book to help guide the choices a brand should make to move the relationship along to the next stage. Where the brand sits on the curve guides the decisions the brand leader will make on the brand strategy and tactics, brand communication including advertising, public relationship and social media, the product innovation and the building of the culture that fuels the consumer experience with the brand. The vision of every brand should be to move the relationship with your consumers to the next stage, to become more loved by consumers, which increases the power and profit potential for the brand.

You have to understand where your brand is today to decide where you want to go next

Even with all these cool new toys available, if you are a Marketer, you need to keep thinking. Long ago there, there was an innovation adoption curve that maps out various types of consumers from innovators to early adopters to early majority to late majority to the late adopters. Depending on the type of product category, we all likely sit at various parts of the curve. I am an early adopter on golf clubs, but pretty much a late adopter on hair styles!  My 18 year old daughter would be an innovator around anything connected to make up, while my 20 year old son knows all the great new shows I should watch.

 

Depending on where your brand sits on the brand love curve, you might deploy different types of influencers to match up to the type of consumer you are going after.

Creating Beloved Brands Marketing Influencers

  • For trend influencer type consumers, they always want the leading edge stuff and be first to try within their social set. They might dig in deep to the wise experts who they trust or rely on in the category. For cars, technology, fashion, entertainment or foodie brands, this might be the leading bloggers or expert reviews. Marketers with something revolutionary to the category, should be targeting and briefing these wise experts to ensure they fully understand your brand story and point of difference to increase their willingness to recommend the new products. The earliest stages of your own product development, the more impactful the voice of the wise experts will be. There is a reason why rumors fuel all the speculation of new products. You have to make sure the wise experts know before anyone else does.
  • The early adopter consumers rely on their innovator friends for the details of new brands. But they will also look to the social icons to see if they are using the product. This gives them an assurance that this new brand is about to hit a tipping point and they want to become users who are out ahead of the curve (pardon the pun).
  • As the brand moves to the masses, whether early or late mass consumers, we see that they look for the advice of trusted peers who they respect to know enough about the latest and greatest. They also look to the early brand lovers, who have fallen so deeply in love with the brand, they become outspoken advocates who want to influence their friends. This gives them evidence that the brand does deliver upon their promise. So they feel comfortable to jump in on this trend.

The traditional marketing is not working so well. Old-school marketing used to yell at all consumers hoping some would try it. It was all about the brand funnel, going from aware to purchase and loyal. Now, we must cultivate our harem of ‘brand lovers’ to create the most amazing consumer experiences that will prompt them talk about their favorite brand. Brands need to learn to whisper to those who love the brand their most, so they will whisper with influence to their own network. I always ask brand leaders “do you treat your best customers the best?”.  I keep hearing “No, we treat them all pretty much the same”. I quietly say in my head:  ARE YOU FREAKING CRAZZZZZY!!!”

Marketing Influencers

 

It is crucial that brand leaders understand exactly where they are on the curve, because the same reason the innovators and early adopters came into your brand is the same reason they may quickly leave.

Four types of brands

Most brands start out as a single product. Early on, brands are desperate and engage more in selling than marketing. They have this mistake that they should appeal to anyone who might buy. The brand begins to meander to meet the needs of any potential customer that walks in the door. The brand’s external reputation quickly becomes “whatever you want it to be”. Once you try to be anything to anyone, you will end up nothing to everyone. The brand has become a cluttered mess in the marketplace, unable to build one consistent brand reputation. Internally, the employees can no longer even explain the brand in a consistent manner. The most remote sales reps have a different message from each other, which does not at all match to the scientist in the lab or the latest TV advertising. Even in the boardroom, various functional leaders now hold a different version of the brand. Internally, the brand will now be a cluttered mess. These innovative brands completely mis-read the power of creating a brand. Brands must use a big idea to establish a consistent delivery of the brand while effectively managing all 5 touch points. While brand communication can drive the brand’s promise into the marketplace, the product must deliver or even over-deliver on the consumer’s expectations of the on that promise.

 

For new brands, I recommend that you look to start as a rebel brand that goes against the entire marketplace, then gradually move to an island brand on its own. Once you have a loyal following, you can then move into a challenger role that can go head to head with a power player brand that is in the leader position.

Rebel Brands

The rebel brand takes the aggressive stance that everyone in the market is stupid, to stand out as a completely different and better choice to a core group of trend influencers who are frustrated with all the competitors in the marketplace. This group becomes your most motivated consumers to buy into your new idea. You must bring these on board and use their influence to begin your journey.

 

How to use innovation to create a beloved brand

At the rebel stage, you must take a high risk, high reward chance on who you will be. At this early stage, the brand should not worry about the mass audience, because most times, they will naturally resist ‘brands that are very different’ as they do not yet see the problem. Playing it safe will be your own destruction. Later on, the mass consumers will follow ‘trend leaders’ who not only identify new solutions, but will eventually use their influence to create new problems in the mass audience. Please never use the word “alienate” when determining your target market. You should naturally alienate those who are not yet ready. Not only does a great brand say who it is for, it should equally say who it is not for. Be careful, you do not try to be mass too soon, or you will lose your base, while not even getting the mass audience.

 

How to use innovation to create a beloved brand

The rebel brand must own a small niche, that is far enough away from the market leaders to avoid getting squashed before your brand can gain any real traction. If you can find a path to expand, having a loyal following of early brand lovers gives you strength to move forward. If you end up staying a niche such as In-N-Out burger, you can solidify your defense of that niche.

To read more on the 4 types of brands, click on this link:

How to use rebellious innovation to create a beloved brand

 

As marketers, we always have to be thinking before we decide whether we should engage a certain tactical tool within our tool kit. My hope is that this challenges  your thinking and opens you up to see how influencer marketing can fit your brand.

To read more on how to create a beloved brand, click on this powerpoint presentation that forms one of our workshops. My hope is that it challenges you to think differently about your own brand situation:

 

Beloved Brands: We make brands stronger and brand leaders smarter.

We will unleash the full potential of your brand. We will lead a 360-degree assessment of your business, help you define your Brand Positioning, create a Big Idea that will transform your brand’s soul into a winning brand reputation and help you build a strategic Brand Plan everyone who works on the brand can follow.

We will make your team of Brand Leaders smarter so they produce exceptional work that drives stronger brand results. We offer brand training on strategic thinking, brand analytics, brand planning, brand positioning, creative briefs and marketing execution.

To contact me, call me at 416 885 3911 or email me at graham@beloved-brands.com

Beloved Brands Graham Robertson

 

 

Today’s best brands win thanks to the passionate and lasting love they establish with their most cherished consumers.

">Creating a beloved brand

Today’s best brands win thanks to the passionate and lasting love they establish with their most cherished consumers.

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in How to Guide for Marketers

 

Brand Love is now a strategy.

No longer should a brand think about their consumers in a strictly functional or logical way. The best brands of today, like Tesla, Apple, Starbucks, Nike, Dove or Airbnb have found a way to capture the imagination of their consumers and take them on a journey of delightful experiences that fosters a deeper emotional and lasting relationship. These brands treat their most cherished consumers with a respect that establishes a trust, that enables consumers to open up to a point where thinking is replaced with feelings, the logic of demand evolves into an emotional state of desire, needs become cravings and repeat purchases progress into rituals that turns into a favorite moment in the day. Consumers transform into the most outspoken and loyal brand fans.

The old logical ways of marketing are not working in today’s world. These brands feel stuck in the past talking about gadgets, features and promotions. They will clearly be ‘friend-zoned’ by consumers, to be purchased only when the brand is on sale. The best brands of the last century were little product inventions that solved small problems consumers did not even realize they had until the product came along. Old-school marketing was dominated by bold logos, catchy jingles, memorable slogans, side-by-side demonstrations, repetitive TV ads, product superiority claims and expensive battles for shelf space at retail stores. Every Marketer focused on entering the consumer’s mind. Marketers of the last century were taught the 4P’s of product, place, price and promotion. It is a useful start, but too product-focused and it misses out on consumer insights, brand promise, emotional benefits and consumer experiences. The Crest brand knew their “Look mom, no cavities” TV ads annoyed everyone, but knew it stuck in the consumer’s brain. No one cared how nice the Tide logo looked, as long as it stood out on a crowed grocery store shelf. The jingle “Plop, plop, fizz, fizz, oh what a relief it is” was repeated often to embed itself in the consumer’s memory bank. The side-by-side dish detergent ad showed spots on the wine glass of a competitor, just to shame consumers into using Cascade. Brands that continue to follow a logical play only, will fail miserably in today’s emotion-driven marketplace.

The best brands of today engage in a strategy that follows a very similar path to the rituals of a courtship. Through the eyes of consumers, brands start as complete strangers and if successful, they move into something similar to a trusted friendship. As the consumer begins to open up, they allow their emotions to take over and without knowing, they begin to love the brand. As the brand weaves itself into the best moments of the consumer’s life, the consumer becomes an outspoken fan, an advocate and one of the many ‘brand lovers’ who cherish the brand. From the strategic mind of the marketer, this follows a very similar pattern to the strategies of a successful courtship.

Consumers must be cherished and ‘won-over’. Today’s consumers are surrounded by a clutter of 5,000 brand messages a day that fight for a glimpse of their attention. That is 1.8 Million per year, or one message every 11 waking seconds. Consumers are constantly distracted—walking, talking, texting, searching, watching, replying—most times at the same time. They glance past most brand messages all day long. Their brain quickly rejects boring, irrelevant or unnecessary messages. Brands must capture the consumer’s imagination right away, with a big idea that is simple, unique, inspiring and creates as much excitement as a first-time encounter.

Consumers are tired of being burned by faulty brand promises. Once lied to, their well-guarded instincts begin to doubt first, test second, and at any point, they will cast aside any brand that does not live up to the original promise that captured them on the first encounter. A brand must be worthy of love. The best brands of today have a soul that exists deep within the culture of the brand organization. The brand’s purpose must be able to explain why the people who work behind the scenes of the brand come to work everyday so energized and ready to over-deliver on the brand’s behalf. This purpose becomes an immovable conviction, with inner motivations, beliefs and values that influences and inspires every employee to want to be part of the brand. This brand conviction must be so strong, the brand would never make a choice that is in direct contradiction with their inner belief system. Consumers start to see, understand and appreciate the level of conviction with the brand. Consumers become willing to open up, they identify with the brand and they trust the brand. The integrity behind the brand helps tighten the consumer’s unshakable bond with the brand.

how to create brand loveBrands must listen, observe and start to know the thoughts of their consumer before they even think it. Not only does the brand meet their needs, the brand must heroically beat down the consumer’s ‘enemy’ that torments their life, every day. The brand must show up consistent at every consumer touch-point, whether it is the promise they make, the stories they tell, the innovation designed to surprise consumers, the easy purchase moments or the delightful consumer experiences that make consumers want to tell their friends about. The consumer keeps track in the back of their mind to make sure it all adds up before they commit. Only then, will the consumer trust the brand. Brands have to do the little things that matter, to show they love their consumer. Every time the brand over-delivers on their promise, it adds a little fuel to the romance each and every time. Over time, the brand must weave itself into the most important moments of the consumer’s lives, and become part of the most cherished stories and memories within their heart.

how to create a beloved brand

Brands need to foster a passionate and lasting love with their consumers.

How can brand leaders replicate Apple’s brand lovers lined up in the rain to buy the latest iPhone before they even know the phone’s features, the Ferrari fans who paint their faces red every week, even though they know they will likely never drive a Ferrari in their lifetime, the ‘Little Monsters’ who believe they are nearly best friends with Lady Gaga, the 400,000 outspoken Tesla brand advocates who put $1,000 down for a car that does not even exist yet or the devoted fans of In-N-Out Burger who order animal-style burgers off the ‘secret menu’ no one else knows about? Every brand should want this type of passion and power with their consumers.

The more ‘brand love’ created, the more brand power generated

Brand love becomes a source of energy that gives the beloved brand a power over the very consumers who love them. The competition crumbles, as they are unable to replicate the emotional bond consumers have with the beloved brand. Channel retailers become powerless in negotiations with the beloved brand, once they realize their own consumers would switch stores before they will switch brands. Suppliers serve at the mercy of the beloved brand, as the high volumes efficiently drive down production costs, which back the supplier into a corner before they offer up most of those savings just to stay a supplier. The beloved brand has a power over the media, whether it means better placement through paid media, more news coverage through earned media, a mystique over key influencers and more talk value through social media or at the lunch table. The beloved brand even has power over employees, who want to work there, not have to work there. They are fellow brand fans, proud to work extra hard on the brand they love.

 

The more ‘brand love’ created, the more brand profits realized

Beloved brands achieve higher profit margins. First, they leverage their brand love with consumers to ensure a price premium is never perceived as excessive. Consumers gladly pay $5 for a Starbucks latte, $500 for an iPad or $100,000+ for a Mercedes. Beloved brands use a good/better/best price strategy to trade cherished consumers up to higher price items. Mercedes sees C class drivers who paid $40,000 as future S Class drivers who will pay over $150,000. A well-run beloved brand uses their high volume to drive efficiency and their brand power to pressure suppliers to lower their costs. A beloved brand has a higher response to marketing programs, that means a more efficient marketing investment. The beloved brands use their momentum to drive higher volume growth. They get loyal users to use more, as consumers build the beloved brand into their life’s routines and daily rituals. The beloved brand can enter new categories, as they know their loyal consumers will follow the brand. Finally, there are more creative opportunities for the beloved brand to find more uses or usage occasions for the beloved brand to fit into the consumer’s life.

The more loved a brand is by consumers, the more powerful and profitable that brand will be.

I wish all Marketers understood this formula. I see agencies tell their clients that brands need to be more emotional. Maybe they would win the argument more if they could demonstrate the resulting power and resulting profit that could transform the argument into the language of the clients.

How can you create a passionate and lasting love with your consumers?

To read more on creating brand love, here is the workshop we run for our clients.

Beloved Brands: We make brands stronger and brand leaders smarter.

We will unleash the full potential of your brand. We will lead a 360-degree assessment of your business, help you define your Brand Positioning, create a Big Idea that will transform your brand’s soul into a winning brand reputation and help you build a strategic Brand Plan everyone who works on the brand can follow.

We will make your team of Brand Leaders smarter so they produce exceptional work that drives stronger brand results. We offer brand training on strategic thinking, brand analytics, brand planning, brand positioning, creative briefs and marketing execution.

To contact me, call me at 416 885 3911 or email me at graham@beloved-brands.com

Beloved Brands Graham Robertson

 

How to use rebellious innovation to create a beloved brand

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in How to Guide for Marketers

how to use innovation to create a beloved brandMost brands start out as a single product. Early on, brands are desperate and engage more in selling than marketing. They have this mistake that they should appeal to anyone who might buy. The brand begins to meander to meet the needs of any potential customer that walks in the door. The brand’s external reputation quickly becomes “whatever you want it to be”. Once you try to be anything to anyone, you will end up nothing to everyone. The brand has become a cluttered mess in the marketplace, unable to build one consistent brand reputation. Internally, the employees can no longer even explain the brand in a consistent manner. The most remote sales reps have a different message from each other, which does not at all match to the scientist in the lab or the latest TV advertising. Even in the boardroom, various functional leaders now hold a different version of the brand. Internally, the brand will now be a cluttered mess. These innovative brands completely mis-read the power of creating a brand. Brands must use a big idea to establish a consistent delivery of the brand while effectively managing all 5 touch points. While brand communication can drive the brand’s promise into the marketplace, the product must deliver or even over-deliver on the consumer’s expectations of the on that promise.

For new brands, I recommend that you look to start as a rebel brand that goes against the entire marketplace, then gradually move to an island brand on its own. Once you have a loyal following, you can then move into a challenger role that can go head to head with a power player brand that is in the leader position.

 

Rebel Brands

The rebel brand takes the aggressive stance that everyone in the market is stupid, to stand out as a completely different and better choice to a core group of trend influencers who are frustrated with all the competitors in the marketplace. This group becomes your most motivated consumers to buy into your new idea. You must bring these on board and use their influence to begin your journey.

How to use innovation to create a beloved brand

At the rebel stage, you must take a high risk, high reward chance on who you will be. At this early stage, the brand should not worry about the mass audience, because most times, they will naturally resist ‘brands that are very different’ as they do not yet see the problem. Playing it safe will be your own destruction. Later on, the mass consumers will follow ‘trend leaders’ who not only identify new solutions, but will eventually use their influence to create new problems in the mass audience. Please never use the word “alienate” when determining your target market. You should naturally alienate those who are not yet ready. Not only does a great brand say who it is for, it should equally say who it is not for. Be careful, you do not try to be mass too soon, or you will lose your base, while not even getting the mass audience.

How to use innovation to create a beloved brand

 

The rebel brand must own a small niche, that is far enough away from the market leaders to avoid getting squashed before your brand can gain any real traction. If you can find a path to expand, having a loyal following of early brand lovers gives you strength to move forward. If you end up staying a niche such as In-N-Out burger, you can solidify your defense of that niche.

Island Brands

I describe Island brands as so different, they are on their own. These are what the marketing industry calls “blue ocean” ideas. You must mobilize your audience of the early trend influencers to gain a core base of early adopters into your franchise. While the rebel brand might gain appeal by calling everyone stupid, the island brand tries to use their modern point of difference to pull consumers away from the leaders, by making the leaders seem detached from the needs of the consumer.

Uber did such a great job at the island brand stage of making the taxi industry appear disconnected from the needs of the consumers, setting up Uber as the only solution. Uber now had the power of an island brand that could take this power into a power player position to defend their castle. Instead, Uber made two crucial errors in judgment.  They diversified their business too quickly into other “quick delivery” models that confuses what the brand stands for. Second, they tried to own the product, price and experience all at once. A brand must lead with one core strength. Sadly, they have allowed themselves to be defined as the ‘price’ brand, when they had an opportunity to own the more lucrative experience brand. What will happen next: Uber’s lower margins will not be able to afford top quality drivers, enabling brands like Lyft to come in and offer a better consumer experience. This could be fatal. Time will tell.

Challenger Brand

People mix up challenger brand and rebel brand. They get excited by the attitude and conviction of the challenger stance of the rebel brand. To me, a challenger brand has used their influence of the trend setters and early adopters to shift from an island brand into a mass brand earned that has earned a hard-fought proximity that allows it to go head-to-head with the power player leader. The challenger brands turn your competitor’s strength into a weakness, pushing them outside of what consumers want, while creating a new consumer problem for which your brand becomes the solution

The idea is to amplify what you do best as an attempt to move the power player’s main strength into a weakness and push them into that disconnected place for some consumers. We love these brand stories, like Mac versus PC, Pepsi versus Coke and Avis versus Hertz. What we fail to tell you are all the assaults of the power player back on the challenger brand that usually keeps them in their place. This is a transition stage for the brand, to see if they can become a true beloved brand of the masses. What will really separate the brand is how much emotion they can fuel into their own brand. While Apple is not the #1 portable computer, they certainly have the most passion to allow them to charge twice the price of the PCs. Also, the Mac stance enabled Apple to sell more iPhones, iPads and iTunes. While people still think of Apple as a rebellious brand, they really have become the “IBM of 2017”, the corporate mega-giant they once battled in the 1980s.

While everyone thinks innovation is logical science, I see a close link with emotional passion

I use where a brand sits on the Brand Love Curve to guide a lot of marketing decisions. We use the Brand Love Curve to get in the shoes of the consumer and understand how they see your brand. There are five stages, unknown, indifferent, like it, love it and finally the beloved stage. These stages replicate the relationship status humans might have as they move from strangers to acquaintances to friends, to a stage of love and onto what we hope is forever. I am a big believer that the Brand Love Curve can guide every brand decision. As well, the more love you can create the more power the brand can generate, and from that comes more growth and profit.

Where your brand sits on the Brand Love Curve can also guide the innovation stance.

  • Indifferent: Focus on the product innovation, with a big idea that can explain and organize each consumer touch point. Go after leading trend influencers in that market, who already see problem and will be the most motivated by what your brand has to offer. Early wins among early brand lovers will help fuel momentum. It will intrigue early adopters to follow.
  • Like It: Use the innovation to separate yourself from competitors, to extrapolate the problems, gaps or frustrations consumers see in mass brands. This sets up your brand as the only solution. Increase investment in brand communication and the purchase moment to tighten the bond with an early group of brand lovers who can be used to influence the broader consumer base.
  • Love It: Use innovation to create experiences and become part of the consumer’s life. Layer in emotion and explore peripheral products around the routine to turn repeat usage in life rituals. Invest to stay ahead of any challenger brands. At this stage, you can use your connection with a loyal base of brand lovers to enter new categories to extend the brand’s big idea across a bigger portfolio of products.
  • Beloved: Extend brand beyond core product. Use innovation to surprise and delight the most base of brand lovers. Attack potential gaps in the current offering with product improvements. Continue to perfect the entire portfolio to gain an equal strength across most product lines. You want to be able to use your brand lovers to have them satisfy all their needs through your brand.

Just as you need to be careful to going after a mass audience too fast, you need to carefully understand the level of bond you have with your current customers before you can understand where you can take them.

To ensure your business leads with innovation, it must become part of the culture. Instill an innovation process to turn random thoughts into action. Here’s the process I recommend:

How to use innovation

Below is our workshop we use to help brands Creating a beloved brand. My hope is that it challenges you to think differently about your own brand situation:

 

Beloved Brands: We make brands stronger and brand leaders smarter.

We will unleash the full potential of your brand. We will lead a 360-degree assessment of your business, help you define your Brand Positioning, create a Big Idea that will transform your brand’s soul into a winning brand reputation and help you build a strategic Brand Plan everyone who works on the brand can follow.

We will make your team of Brand Leaders smarter so they produce exceptional work that drives stronger brand results. We offer brand training on strategic thinking, brand analytics, brand planning, brand positioning, creative briefs and marketing execution.

To contact me, call me at 416 885 3911 or email me at graham@beloved-brands.com

Beloved Brands Graham Robertson

 

Three simple ways Marketers can get better advertising

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in How to Guide for Marketers

http://beloved-brands.com/learn/Most marketers appear confused as to what their role should be in getting great advertising. Having spent 20 years in the world of CPG marketing, I have seen it all when it comes to clients–the good, the bad and the ugly.

There is usually one brand person on the “hot seat” for getting a great ad, and then a bunch around them who either give input or approve. Everyone on the client side knows it, but most on the agency do not know it. They assume the person approving the ad is their client. That’s completely wrong, especially when the person on the “hot seat” is very good. While you are talking to the “approver” in the room, the smart person on the hot seat will carry influence over the person approving outside the room. You might end up surprised.

Here are 3 ways to get better advertising. 

  1. You should control the strategy but give freedom to the execution.
  2. A great client can get great work from an OK agency. But an awful client can get awful work from the best agency in the world.
  3. Stop thinking that your role is to change whatever work is presented to you.

1. Control the strategy, but give freedom on to the execution.

Too many Marketers have this backwards. They give freedom on the strategy with various possible strategic options layered within the Creative Brief and then they attempt to try to control the creative outcome by writing a long list of tangled mandatories.

The reality of advertising is that clients want options to pick from, and agencies hate giving options to pick from. This is where things get off the rails. The client decides to write options INTO the brief. And the agency presents a bunch of work, yet miraculously all 12 people on the agency side agree on which one is the best one.

I have seen briefs that say “18-65, current users, competitive users and employees”. I have seen briefs with 8 objectives throughout the brief. I have seen briefs that say “we want to drive trial among competitive users, while re-enforcing the brand benefits to our current users to drive up penetration and we want a tag for our new lemon flavor at the end”. Ugly!!!!

How to get better advertising creative briefs

When you write a big-wide Creative Brief with layers of possible strategic options within the brief, the Agency just peels the brief apart and gives you strategic options. For instance, if you put a big wide target market of 18-65, the Agency will presents one idea for 18-25, another for 25-40 and a third for 40-65. If you put two objectives into the brief, asking to drive trial and drive usage, you will get one ad that drives trial and one ad that drives usage. Ta-dah, you have options. However, now you are picking your brand strategy based on which ad you like best. Wow, what the brand leader now says is “I like that 18-25 year old one, but could I also like that drive trial one. Could you mold those  two together?” If you are up against your media date or the agency is over-budget on this project, the answer you might hear back is “sure”.

This means is you are really picking your brand strategy based on which ad idea you like best. That is wrong. Pick your strategy first and use the creativity of execution to express that strategy.

Make tough decisions of what goes into the creative brief to narrow down to:

  • one objective
  • one desired consumer response
  • one target tightly defined
  • one main benefit
  • up to two main reasons to believe

Avoid the ‘Just in Case’ list by taking your pen and stroking a few things off your creative brief! It is always enlightening when you tighten your Creative Brief.

As for the creative, it is completely OK to know exactly what you want, but you cannot know until you actually see it. The best creative advertising should be like that special gift you never thought to get yourself, but was just perfect once you saw it. What I see is a brief with a list of mandatories weaved throughout the brief that begin to almost write the ad itself.

Years ago, I was on the quit smoking business (Nicoderm) and received word that my team had told the agency to “eliminate any form of humor, because quitting smoking is very serious”. I can appreciate how hard it is to quit smoking, but levity can help demonstrate to consumers that we understand how hard it is to quit. After some disastrous work, I finally stepped in and said “what about some humorous ads?”  Here’s the spot we final made. This ad turned a declining Nicoderm business into a growth situation and won J&J’s best global ad of 2008.

 

There is no way we could have written that ad. After a few grueling months of creative, I remember seeing that script on the table and before we were half way through the reading of the script, I thought “we gotta make this ad”.

2. A great client can get great work from an OK agency. But an awful client can get awful work from the best agency in the world.

I never figured this one out till much later in my career. For an average Brand Manager, you will only be on the “hot seat” for so long in your career. Ugh. I wish it was not true. I loved advertising. However, coming up through the CPG world, most brands only do 1-2 big campaign ads per year.  And, if you do a pool-out of a successful spot, it is just not as fun. Finding that gem must be a similar exhilaration that a detective has in solving a crime. The reality is that you spend 2-3 years as an Assistant offering your advice to a table that does not want to listen. And most brand managers will spend  5 years on the “hot seat” where you are either a Brand Manager or Marketing Director. Then you are approving stuff outside the room.

Yyou likely will only make 5+ ads where you turn nothing into something. If you are lucky. I had one campaign that ran 10 years and another ran 5 years. Trust me, the true excitement was really on that first year. Depends on the size of your agency, but they might make 20, 50 or 100+ new campaign spots each year. The math is that your agency can mess up your ONE spot and still win agency of the year. The client matters way more to the equation than you might realize. A great client can get good-to-great work from an OK agency. Equally so, a really bad client can get disastrous work from the world’s greatest advertising minds.

I want to ask you one simple question and you have to be honest: “If you knew that being a better client would get you better advertising, do you think you would show up better?” Do you think you show up right now?

Brand Training Marketing Execution Advertising
As part of our Brand Management training program, we teach marketers how to get better Marketing Execution. Click above to learn more.

 

Your main role in the advertising function is to provide a very tight brand strategy, to inspire greatness from the creative people and to make decisions”. Too many clients treat their agency in ways that they have to make great work because we hired them. True. But remember the math. If they make 99 great spots this year and one god awful spot (yours) who has more at stake in this math?  You or your agency. Sure, you can fire them. But they take their 99 spots on the street and secure more clients. You on the other hand, will be put into a ‘non-advertising’ role for the rest of your career. People behind your back will say “they are really smart on the strategy, but not so good with the agency”.

Stop thinking your agency has to work for you and try to inspire them to want to work for you. All of our work is done through other people. Our greatness as a Brand Leader has to come from the experts we engage, so they will be inspired to reach for their own greatness and apply it on our brand. Brand Management has been built on a hub-and-spoke system, with a team of experts surrounding the generalist Brand Leader. When I see Brand Managers of today doing stuff, I feel sorry for them. They are lost. Brand Leaders are not designed to be experts in marketing communications, experts in product innovation and experts in selling the product. You are trained to be a generalist, knowing enough to make decisions, but not enough to actually do the work. Find strength being the least knowledgeable person in every room you enter.

3. Stop thinking that your role is to change whatever work is presented to you.

A typical advertising meeting has client on one side and agency on the other. Client has a pen and paper (or laptop) feverishly taking notes. I never bring anything to a creative meeting. As soon as the creative person says the last tag-line, all of a sudden, there is a reading of the list of changes about to happen. “Make the boy’s shirt blue instead of red. Red is our competitor. Can we go with a grandmother instead of the uncle because we sell lots of cheese to  older females. Can we add in our claim with a super on it. I know we said in the brief it’s about usage, but can we also add in a “try it” message for those who have never used it before. And lastly, can we change the tagline?  I will email some options. That’s all I have.”

how to get better advertising marketing trainingWow. Stop thinking that the creative meeting is just a starting point where you can now fix whatever work is presented to you. You hired an agency because you do not have the talent to come up with great ads. Yet, now you think you are talented enough to do something even harder: change the ad. I have learned over the years that giving the agency my solutions will make the work worse. Giving them my problems makes the ads better. Just like being surprised by a great ad in the first place, if you just state your problem, and let them come back with solutions, you might be surprised at how they were able to handle your concerns without completely wrecking the ad.

I once heard a brand leader describe the creative part of the ad as “their part” and the copy-intensive brand sell as “our part”. I never thought about it that way. And I wish I could get it out of my head. An ad should flow naturally like a well-tuned orchestra. The creative should work as ONE part. The creative idea should be what attracts attention, the creative idea should be what naturally draws attention to the brand, the creative idea should help communicate the brand story and the creative idea should be what sticks in the mind of the consumer. There is no us or them part of the ad.

Lastly, I want brand leaders to stop thinking that Advertising is like a bulletin board where you can pin up one more message. Somehow Marketers have convinced themselves that they can keep jamming one more message into their ad. The consumer’s brain does not work that way. They see 5,000 brand messages a day. They may engage in 5-10 a day. When they see your cluttered messy bulletin board, their brain naturally rejects and moves on. Not only are you not getting your last message through, you are not getting any messages through. Start to think of Advertising like standing on top of a mountain and just yelling one thing.

If you knew that showing up better would get you better work, would you show up better?  You should. 

If you want to learn how to show up better, we train marketing teams on how to get better Marketing Execution. We go through how to write better briefs, how to make better decisions and how to give inspiring feedback to realize the greatness of your creative people. Here’s what the workshop looks like:

Beloved Brands: Who are we?

At Beloved Brands, we promise that we will make your brand stronger and your brand leaders smarter. We can help you come up with your brand’s Brand Positioning, Big Idea and Brand Concept. We also can help create Brand Plans that everyone in your organization can follow and helps to focus your Marketing Execution. We provide a new way to look at Brand Management, that uses a provocative approach to align your brand to the sound fundamentals of brand management.

We will make your team of Brand Leaders smarter so they can produce exceptional work that drives stronger brand results. We offer brand training on every subject in marketing, related to strategic thinking, analytics, brand planning, positioning, creative briefs, customer marketing and marketing execution.

To contact us, email us at graham@beloved-brands.com or call us at 416-885-3911. You can also find us on Twitter @belovedbrands.

Beloved Brands Graham Robertson