Tapping into your consumer’s need for a life change

Posted on Posted in How to Guide for Marketers

Everyday we hear change, change, and more change. Talk at the lunch table will be about the changes we are going to make in our lives next year. We start thinking about resolutions. change modelWhile we constantly think of ways to improve ourselves, most people hate change.

We think about change more than we take action for change. Psychologists estimate that 95% of the thoughts we will have today, are the same thoughts we had yesterday. How’s that for change? Brands can help consumers move through a model of change.

When it comes to change, I have always mapped out four types of consumers, based on whether they are proactive or reactive mindset and whether they are trying to prevent or repair a problem.

Proactive consumers are driven by knowledge; reactive consumers are driven by an event. Preventers are willing to change the lifestyle; repair type consumers want to directly address the issue at hand, without changing their overall lifestyle.

Mapping this out, we see four potential types of consumers:

  • Proactive Preventers do what it takes to maintain their overall health. They watch what they eat, workout, do things in moderation and maintain overall good health. Their change is usually triggered by information about new learnings in the healthcare field. Consumer BehaviorThey’d be early adopters to new trends. What lies in their motivation could be a combination of overall health values or something in their family history that might motivate them to maintain such a healthy lifestyle.
  • Reactive Preventers change their ways and shift their life completely based on a trigger in their life. It could be an event that happened directly to them or someone close to them. The change is an awakening that makes them re-look everything in their life and then they realize they are no longer invincible. They might start connecting the lifestyle to the event and they want to make the change overall.
  • Proactive Repair consumers have the need for change triggered by knowledge. It could be a news story or key influencers provide them with new information that makes them undertake the change before things happen. Many times people get so busy they didn’t realize what happened and then the trigger makes them re-look and fix it before things happen. The trigger could be having a baby or turning 40 or just a realization that things got out of control.
  • Reactive Repair consumers are usually those who experience something bad and then they feel forced to make a change. It could be the first major health scare. The change is isolated to the cause of the event.

Change model

Ever notice when someone is going to quit smoking they might say “on February 1st, I’m going to quit” or “I’m going on my diet on Monday”. It might sound silly but what they are doing is following the Preparation Stage of a Change Model. They put a stake in the ground so they can spend some time mentally getting ready for the change. As we come up on January 1st, we will see people go on diets, quit smoking, join a gym, start following a new routine.

It is also why marketers want to own New Year’s Eve.

change model

The most common change model has 5 stages:

  • Pre-Contemplation: Consumers might know they have a problem, but have no intention of taking action in the foreseeable future. May have failed before.
  • Contemplation: Consumers recognize their behavior is a problem. They begin searching for solutions that fit with their needs and abilities to succeed.
  • Preparation: Consumers intend to take action in immediate future. They lock in a date, arrange plan/tools and take other small steps that may help success.
  • Action: As the big day has arrived, all the motivation built up in preparation stage will help the first day, and hopefully past the fifth day.
  • Maintenance: The biggest challenge at this stage is to make it through potential failure points, linked to your old lifestyle/routines. For longterm success, it’s important to build new routines in your life.

How Marketing can match up to the change model

At the early stages, you need to find some way to trigger consumers into the consideration of the need for change. For the proactive consumers, take advantage of their mindset by trying to trigger a need for change. Drive the awareness of the problem and outline risks, dangers and issues of non action.  For the reactive consumers, use influencers such as peers or healthcare professionals to help dialup the seriousness of the need for change.

As consumers move to the contemplation stage, they try to get themselves ready. Show positive easy solutions and make change feel doable. Use your brand to help them visualize what change will look like, and set up the idea that they are capable. Change their minds about their confidence level with something new.

As consumers move to the preparation stage, they look for information to help their journey and reenforce their capability for achieving success. Own search, as consumers turn to the internet before they turn to healthcare professionals. By helping consumers early on, you may hold onto them throughout the change journey. Use the entry point to introduce the idea of a coach or self-help group. As consumers feel reluctant to take action, they worry they may fail. The coach or group can help add confidence they are not in this alone. Professional, peer, counsellor or online support can be highly effective with daily motivational tips to keep going.

Moving to action

Just before the action stage, help them set realistic goals. Baby steps might be necessary early on, so the consumer can experience a degree of success and feel motivated to keep going. Early failure could send them into the relapse before the change kicks in. They say it’s twenty-one days to change a habit, but it’s usually a lot longer with all the temptations around.

The change doesn’t end until you get through the maintenance stage. The consumer needs to build change into their life. Even a year later, consumers could find an event that triggers them into a relapse. A lot of vices are connected with stress. For many, comfort food or a coffee and a cigarette just feel great when things get highly stressful. So a new level of life stress can see the consumer reaching for old habits.  Compliance is never an easy thing–even the most serious of heart medications can struggle with compliance.

change model

Keep awareness strong at all stages.

Depending on the potential size of the business, you may wish to cover all parts of the change model with a constant level of brand awareness. Stay visible so when the consumer looks for solutions, you brand is the first point of consideration.

Consumer insights for quitting smoking 

When I worked in the quit-smoking categories, I used the 360-degree mining for consumer insights. I have never smoked in my life, so all of this was new and forced me to listen, observe, and go deeper.

  • The starting data point was, “Studies show smokers will try to quit cold-turkey over seven times before reaching for a smoking aid to help them quit.” It speaks to how hard it is to quit, and how many times it takes to achieve success. Regarding smoking aids, it shows how the product is the last resort.
  • Adding observations from focus groups, I could see how smokers become very agitated. We held two-hour focus groups and talked non-stop about what could get them to quit smoking. In the first hour, they were polite, but after one hour without a cigarette, I could see their agitation grow to a boiling point.   
  • When I listened further, I heard them say, “I feel guilty I can’t quit” or “I know I should quit” or “Whenever I quit, I feel I’m not myself. I get so irritable that I give up” or “I wish smoking wasn’t so bad for you because quitting smoking sucks.” These are some of the underlying feelings coming out, expressed in their words.
  • Using the emotional need states, I gravitated to the consumer’s lack of optimism or confidence to quit, how smokers feel out of control whenever they try to quit, and how they feel not themselves.
  • Observing how quitting smoking fits into their lives, I could see how they take their misery from trying to quit out on those around them. They linked the moment of quitting smoking with their “worst version of themselves coming out” and talked about “the monster.” Some said their spouse or friends had told them they would prefer they keep smoking rather than having to deal with this terrible version of themselves. 

Consumer insight (connection point):

  • “I know I should quit. I’ve tried to quit smoking so many times, it’s ridiculous. I’m not myself. I’m grouchy, irritable and feel out of control. Quitting smoking sucks!” When I shared this secret back with smokers who want to quit, they say, “Yup, that’s exactly how I feel.”

Consumer enemy (pain point):

  • “I fear quitting smoking will bring out the monster in me, turning me into the worst version of myself.” 

consumer insights

 

Having worked in the quit smoking business for years, here’s a TV ad that shows just how hard change really is. People quit 6-8 times on their own before reaching for the help of a quit smoking product. We capitalized on that fact to show a side-by-side demonstration of the difference when using Nicoderm.

 

To learn more about this type of thinking, you should explore my new book, Beloved Brands.

With Beloved Brands, you will learn everything you need to know so you can build a brand that your consumers will love.

You will learn how to think strategically, define your brand with a positioning statement and a brand idea, write a brand plan everyone can follow, inspire smart and creative marketing execution and analyze the performance of your brand through a deep-dive business review.

Beloved Brands book

To order the e-book version or the paperback version from Amazon, click on this link: https://lnkd.in/eF-mYPe

If you use Kobo, you can find Beloved Brands in over 30 markets using this link: https://lnkd.in/g7SzEh4

And if you are in India, you can use this link to order: https://lnkd.in/gDA5Aiw

Beloved Brands: Who are we?

At Beloved Brands, our purpose is to help brands find a new pathway to growth. We believe that the more love your brand can generate with your most cherished consumers, the more power, growth, and profitability you will realize in the future.

We think the best solutions are likely inside you already, but struggle to come out. Our unique playbook tools are the backbone of our workshops. We bring our challenging voice to help you make decisions and refine every potential idea.

We start by defining a brand positioning statement, outlining the desired target, consumer benefits and support points the brand will stand behind. And then, we build a brand idea that is simple and unique enough to stand out in the clutter of the market, motivating enough to get consumers to engage, buy and build a loyal following with your brand.

We will help you write a strategic brand plan for the future, to get everyone in your organization to follow. It starts with an inspiring vision that pushes your team to imagine a brighter future. We use our strategic thinking tools to help you make strategic choices on where to allocate your brand’s limited resources.

Our brand playbook methodology will challenge you to unlock future growth for your brand

  1. Our deep-dive assessment process will give you the knowledge of the issues facing your brand, so you can build a smart plan to unleash future growth.
  2. Find a winning brand positioning statement that motivates consumers to buy, and gives you a competitive advantage to drive future growth.
  3. Create a brand idea to capture the minds and hearts of consumers, while inspiring and focusing your team to deliver greatness on the brand’s behalf.
  4. Build a brand plan to help you make smart focused decisions, so you can organize, steer, and inspire your team towards higher growth.
  5. Advise on advertising, to find creative that drives branded breakthrough and use a motivating messaging to set up long-term brand growth.
  6. Our brand training program will make your brand leaders smarter, so you have added confidence in their performance to drive brand growth.

To learn more about our coaching, click on this link: Beloved Brands Strategic Coaching

To learn more about our training programs, click on this link: Beloved Brands Training

If you need our help, email me at graham@beloved-brands.com or call me at 416 885 3911

You have my personal promise to help you solve your brand building challenges. I will give you new thinking, so you can unlock future growth for your brand.

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How your brand can win, by linking into the Consumers’ need for a life change

Posted on Posted in How to Guide for Marketers

While the news is filled with change, change and more change. While we talk at the lunch table about the changes we are going to make in our lives next year and while we walk around constantly thinking of ways to improve ourselves, most people hate change. We think about change more than we take action for change. In fact, 95% of the thoughts we’ll have today, are the exact same thoughts we had yesterday. How’s that for progress.

Ever notice when someone is going to quit smoking they might say “on February 1st, I’m going to quit” or “I’m going on my diet on Monday”. It might sound silly but what they are doing is following the Preparation Stage of a Change Model as they put a stake in the ground so they can spend some time to mentally get ready for the change. Change can happen in many categories but it happens a lot in the healthcare and wellness space, which is why January is filled with people go on diets, quit smoking, join a gym, start following a new routine. The new year has triggered and facilitated the change. It’s also why marketers in these categories want to own New Years eve or even Sunday night to capture consumers when they are ready for change. I know when I worked at Johnson and Johnson, we specifically targeted Sunday nights, as people were in a mode for change as well as in the mood for digesting information.

In healthcare, the way I’ve always modelled change is to map out whether consumers are either proactive or reactive mindset and whether they are trying to prevent or repair a problem. Proactives are driven by knowledge whereas Reactives are driven by an event. Preventers are those who connect lifestyle to the health issue and are willing to change the lifestyle. Whereas, repair types are those who directly address the issue at hand, but may not change their overall lifestyle. Mapping this out, we see four potential types of consumers:

  • Proactive Preventers do what it takes to maintain their overall health. They watch what they eat, workout, do things in moderation and maintain overall good health. Their change is usually triggered by information about new learnings in the healthcare field. They’d be early adopters to new trends.  What lies in their motivation could be a combination of overall health values or something in their family history that might motivate them to maintain such a healthy lifestyle.
  • Reactive Preventers change their ways and shift their life completely based on a trigger in their life. It could be an event that happened directly to them or someone close to them. The change is an awakening that makes them re-look everything in their life and then they realize they are no longer invincible. They might start connecting the lifestyle to the event and then want to make the change overall.
  • Proactive Fix have the need for change triggered by knowledge. It could be a news story or a key influencers provide them with new information that makes them undertake the change before things happen. Many times people get so busy they didn’t realize what happened and then the trigger makes them re-look and fix it before things happen. The trigger could be having a baby or turning 40 or just a realization that things got out of control.
  • Reactive Fix are usually those who experience something bad and then they feel forced to make a change. It could be the first major health scare. The change is isolated to the cause of the event.

The most common change model has 5 stages:

  1. Pre-Contemplation where they are not ready or willing to change. They likely know the health risks, but they remain at the denial or invincible stage.
  2. Contemplation usually triggered by something they might consider and even start to get ready. This is where they may dig in and find out information about what a potential change would entail and judge whether they are capable of such a change.
  3. Preparation where they declare to themselves that they are ready for the change. Here’s where they set a date, decide on what steps they may need for the change and look into tools that can help them.
  4. Action which is the early stages of the change. Most people need to see some early results as motivation to keep going. People are continuously quitting smoking or going on diets–whether that’s every year or even monthly.
  5. Maintenance where they try to keep going with the change. One of the biggest issues in the healthcare world is compliance. People relapse back to their old ways, starting to smoke again or re-gain the lost weight. They say it takes 21 days to form a habit, but with the degree of change it could take even a year. And relapses have been known to happen years later.

How the Marketing can match up to the change model

At the early stages, you need to find some way to trigger them into the consideration of the need for change.  For the Pro-Active Consumers, you can take advantage of their mindset by trying to trigger a need for change by connecting your product to a risk or a known solution need state. You would want to drive problem awareness & outline risks, dangers, issues of non action.  For the Reactive Consumers, you likely need to be there at the trigger point, using key influencers such as healthcare professionals to help dial-up the seriousness of the need for change.

As consumers are in the contemplation stage, they start to prepare and get themselves ready. You want to show positive easy solutions and make change feel do-able. You can use your product to help them visualize that the change would be easier and help set up the idea that they are capable.  You can change their minds about their confidence level with something new.

As they move to the preparation stage, they’ll look for information that can help their journey and re-enforce their capability for achieving success. You want to Own Search. In the modern world, consumers turn to the internet before they turn to healthcare professionals. By helping the consumer early, you may be able to hold onto them throughout the change journey. The problem is that every brand knows this and will drive the costs of search and everyone is doing great websites that are  providing information, advice and tips as they ready themselves. You may wish to use the entry point as the time to introduce the idea of a coach or self-help group. As consumers feel reluctant to take action, they worry they may fail. The coach or group can help add confidence they are not in this alone. Professional, peer, counsellor or on-line support.  With the internet, a virtual coach can be highly effective with daily motivational tips to keep going.

Just before the Action stage, it’s important to help them set realistic goals. Baby steps might be necessary early on, so the consumer can experience a degree of success and feel motivated to keep going. Early failure could send them into the relapse before the change kicks in. They say it’s 21 days to change a habit, but it’s usually a lot longer with all the temptations around.

The change doesn’t end until you get through the maintenance stage. It becomes all about compliance and building the change into your life. Even a year later, you could find an event that triggers you into a relapse.  A lot of vices are connected with stress. For many, comfort food or a coffee and a cigarette just feel great when things get highly stressful. So a new level of life stress can see the consumer reaching for old habits.  Compliance is never an easy thing–even the most serious of heart medications can struggle with compliance.

Keep awareness strong at all stages.

Depending on the potential size of the business, you may wish to cover all parts of the Change Model with a constant level of brand awareness. You want to be visible so that when the consumer turns to looking at solutions, you’re well known and the first point of consideration. For smaller and more specific categories, the first point of awareness would come into play after the consumer has been diagnosed giving power to that doctor recommendation. Doctors love to write scripts, because their patients expect answers. But they can also be conservative and slow to adopt new items, preferring to stay with their trust and usual choice.

Having worked in the quit smoking business for years, here’s a TV ad that shows just how hard change really is. People quit 6-8 times on their own before reaching for the help of a quit smoking product such as Nicoderm or Nicorrette. We capitalized on that fact to show a side-by-side demonstration of the difference when using Nicoderm.

 

Beloved Brands: Who are we?

At Beloved Brands, we promise that we will make your brand stronger and your brand leaders smarter. We can help you come up with your brand’s Brand Positioning, Big Idea and Brand Concept. We also can help create Brand Plans that everyone in your organization can follow and helps to focus your Marketing Execution. We provide a new way to look at Brand Management, that uses a provocative approach to align your brand to the sound fundamentals of brand management. 

We will make your team of Brand Leaders smarter so they can produce exceptional work that drives stronger brand results. We offer brand training on every subject in marketing, related to strategic thinking, analytics, brand planning, positioning, creative briefs, customer marketing and marketing execution. 

To contact us, email us at graham@beloved-brands.com or call us at 416-885-3911.You can also find us on Twitter @belovedbrands. 

 

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