How to build your brand positioning statement around benefit clusters">

How to build your brand positioning statement around benefit clusters

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in How to Guide for Marketers

The reality with most brands is that great brands can do a few things, that give the consumer a few different functional benefits and a few different emotional benefits. One of the tools I work with clients on is to figure out the clusters, which are the groupings of similar benefits that a brand can deliver, then work to narrow down which of those benefits can stand out as the most motivating to consumers and the most own-able for the brand. What you are looking for is that winning zone where you are meeting consumer needs better than your competitors. To be successful, brands have to be better, different, cheaper…or else they will not be around for very long. This process will help you find your winning zone.

The Consumer Benefits Ladder

The Consumer Benefits Ladder helps turn your brand’s features into consumer benefits. You should stop thinking about what your brand does and start thinking about what your consumer gets.

Consumer Benefit LadderConsumer Benefit LadderThe 4 steps to build a Consumer Benefits Ladder:

  1. Leverage all available research to brief the team, helping define the consumer target profile with consumer insights, need states and the consumer enemy.
  2. Brainstorm all the possible brand features that your brand offers, plus any brand assets. Make sure that these features give your brand a competitive advantage.
  3. Move up to the functional benefits by putting yourself in the shoes of the consumer and for each feature on your list, ask “so if I am the consumer, what do I get from that?” Challenge yourself to come up with better benefits by asking the question up to 5 times, to the answers into a richer zone.
  4. Then move up to the emotional benefits by looking at each functional benefit and then ask “so if I am the consumer, how does that make me feel?” As you did in step 3, keep asking the question until you see a deeper emotional space that you can play in and own.

Functional Benefits

 To help Brand Leaders, I have taken the 9 functional need state zones shown earlier in this chapter and expanded the list to over 50 potential functional benefits that you can build your brand around. As you look through the list, gravitate to the functional benefits you think will fit the needs of your consumers, and where your brand can do it better than competitors. Start with my words and layer in your own creative language with specific category or consumer language.

Functional benefit Cheat Sheet

Emotional Benefits

Below you will find a list of 40 potential emotional benefits. From my experience, Marketers are better at the rational benefits than they are at the emotional benefits. I swear every brand thinks their brand should be the trusted, reliable and yet like-able. As a brand, you want to own one emotional space in the consumer’s heart as much as you own the rational space in the consumer’s mind. When I push Brand Managers to get emotional, they struggle and opt for what they view as obvious emotions, even if they do not fit with their brand. I have used Hotspex research methodology to create a ‘cheat sheet’ with 8 major emotional consumer benefits, that includes optimism, freedom, being noticed, being liked, comfort, be myself, be in control and knowledge. To own a space in the consumer’s heart, brands should own and dominate one of these zones, always thinking relative to what zone your competitor may own. Do not choose a list of emotions from all over the map, or you will confuse your consumer. Use the supporting words to add flavor to your brand positioning.

Emotional benefit Cheat Sheet

Build Around Benefit Clusters

 As you start to make decisions on which benefits your brand will stand behind, I recommend you start by looking at the two cheat sheets and find potential clusters of the functional and emotional benefits, that you believe match up with what consumers want and what your brand does better than other competitors. Below where I have mapped out benefit clusters for Gray’s Cookies, a fictional cookie brand that combines great taste and low calories.

In terms of functional benefits, it makes sense to build the brand around functional benefits such as healthy, sensory and experiences and emotional benefits such as control, knowledge, and optimism. Once you have those benefits, you can apply the unique brand or category language to write out benefit statements. For instance, you could use the clusters to write a functional benefit statement such as “I get a great tasting cookie, as good as my current cookie” or an emotional benefit statement like “I feel in control of my health”.

Consumer Benefit Clusters

Use the brainstorm to populate the Consumer Benefits Ladder worksheet to focus your thinking. Like any brainstorm, you will end up more choices than you can use. 

Consumer BenefitsThe next step beyond the worksheet is to narrow down the list by sorting through the benefits to find those that are the most motivating to consumers and the most own-able for your brand. Use the grid below to evaluate, where the zones match up to the Venn diagram on brand positioning. Think of this as the flattened out version of the 3 circles.

Positioning Grid

Looking at the Brand Positioning Benefit Sort above, you can see on the grid how The “Guilt free” consumer benefit offers the highest potential, as it is highly motivating and highly own-able for the brand. This is the winning zone that matches up to the positioning zones we showed in Chapter 8 on competitive strategy. The consumer benefit of “New favorite cookie” is highly motivating, but falls into the losing zone, as it would be owned by the power player competitor brands in the category. The “Feel more confident” benefit falls into the risky zone. To win this zone, the brand would need to use speed-to-market, creativity or leveraging emotional marketing. Avoid the dumb zone, where the benefit shows up low on motivating and potential ownership. In this case, “More comfort in choices” is neither motivating nor own-able.

Turning it into a Brand Positioning Statement

After doing all the homework, you can now confidently put together a winning Brand Positioning Statement that addresses:

  1. Who is your consumer target? Keep the target focused. Do not be vague in your definition. Never go after two segments at the same time. Bring the target to life with need states, consumer insights and a consumer enemy.  
  2. Where will you play? Define the space you play in, against those brands you compete against. Which competitor do you fight against for the same dollars?
  3. Where will you win? Narrow your benefit down to one thing. Never try to stand for too many things at once—whether too many functional benefits or too many emotional benefits. You cannot be all things to all people. Make sure you talk benefits, not features. Find the ideal space that is unique and motivating to the consumers, while being own-able for your brand.
  4. Why should they believe us? The role of support points is to close off any potential doubts the consumer might have when they see the main benefit. Watch out that these are not just random claims or features that you want to jam into your brand message. They should support and fit with the main benefit.

Brand Positioning Statement

 

Here’s a powerpoint presentation on how to define your brand, including the benefit cluster tool.

Beloved Brands: Who are we?

At Beloved Brands, we promise that we will make your brand stronger and your brand leaders smarter. We can help you come up with your brand’s Brand Positioning, Big Idea and Brand Concept. We also can help create Brand Plans that everyone in your organization can follow and helps to focus your Marketing Execution. We provide a new way to look at Brand Management, that uses a provocative approach to align your brand to the sound fundamentals of brand management. 

We will make your team of Brand Leaders smarter so they can produce exceptional work that drives stronger brand results. We offer brand training on every subject in marketing, related to strategic thinking, analytics, brand planning, positioning, creative briefs, customer marketing and marketing execution. 

To contact us, email us at graham@beloved-brands.com or call us at 416-885-3911. You can also find us on Twitter @belovedbrands. 

Graham Robertson Bio Brand Training Coach Consultant

The 10 essential steps of the Creative Advertising process the Brand Leader must lead">Creative Advertising Process

The 10 essential steps of the Creative Advertising process the Brand Leader must lead

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in How to Guide for Marketers

When it comes to advertising, one of the biggest struggles that Brand Leaders have is when the project gets out of hand. While there are ten essential steps, the Brand Leader must keep their head in the game at all times. One slip and they run the risk of losing control of the final execution. These steps are not written from the vantage of the agency, but rather that of the client.

Creative Advertising Process

  1. Strategy Pre-Work: The brand positioning and brand plan homework make it easier to write a great creative brief. Go deep on finding the consumer insights and consumer enemy, understand the brand positioning, the big idea and then lay out a brand concept. From the brand plan, write a tightly focused brand communications plan. Only once you have done all this homework done, should you take a pen to the creative brief.
  2. Focused Creative Brief: Sit with your agency and turn your homework into a creative brief. Debate every point. Keep it focused. Think of the brief like creating a strategic box the ad must play within. The brief must have one objective, a tightly defined target market with rich consumer insights, one crystal clear desired consumer response of whether you want consumers to see, think, feel or do and then one main message that you know will motivate the consumer target will respond positively.
  3. Creative Expectations: Just after signing off on the brief, you should request an informal meeting with the creative team to help convey your vision, passion, strategy and needs to the team. This is your first chance to inspire the team and begin the push for great work. It always surprises me that the first time the marketer meets their creative team is at the first creative meeting, which is two-three weeks after the creative team started to work on your brand. That is crazy. It seems like an old-school way for the account team to control both the client and creative team, keeping them at arm’s length. I believe the best advertising comes from a highly personal relationship with your creative team.
  4. Tissue Session: When you have a completely new campaign or working on high-risk campaign, you should ask to hold an informal tissue session before the creative meeting. At the tissue session, the creative team normally presents ten roughed out advertising ideas, usually with hand drawn visuals, with a simple headline and description of a story. This is a good chance to get your hands dirty, understand where the team wants to go, either encouraging them to keep exploring further on some ideas or talk about how some ideas might not fit. Think of this meeting as your chance to see behind the creative curtain. Do not abuse this privilege by adding your ideas to the mix. Focus on big ideas and use the meeting to inspire and push for better.
  5. Creative Meeting: How you show up at the first creative meeting is crucial to the entire project. I have seen the relationship fizzle on the spot. Think of it like a first date. Be on your best behavior. Stay positive and focus on big picture decisions. Give direction and make decisions. However, do not use this time to add your own solutions. Stop thinking that your job is to fix the work you see. Do not get too wrapped up in small details, as there remains plenty of time to keep working on details. Use your feedback to inspire the team.Creative Advertising Process
  6. Feedback Memo: Work it out with the agency ahead of time that you will give a feedback memo 48 hours after the creative meeting. This gives you the chance to gather your thoughts, balancing your creative instincts with your strategic thinking. The memo should clarify details you did not have a chance to talk about in the creative meeting. Where you are stuck, frame it as a problem, but avoid giving your specific solutions. Use the memo as a chance to create a new box for the creative team, an evolution from the creative brief.
  7. Advertising Testing: The use of ad testing can depend on timing, budget or degree of risk. Where you have a new major campaign, you should potentially test 3 ideas you feel have the best chance to express your brand positioning, communicate the main benefit, break through the clutter and motivate consumers to purchase. You can use qualitative focus group feedback that will help confirm your instincts, or quantitative testing to replicate and predict how it may do in the market. However, I am a big believer that you should only use ad testing to confirm your pick, never to make your decision.  
  8. Gain Approval: It is essential to keep your boss aware at every stage. Use your first meeting with your boss to state your vision for the project. Through each update meeting, keep your boss aligned to your vision, explaining every move you make with respect to that vision. However, you will still need to sell in the ad. Be ready to fight any resisters to make the ad happen. With every great ad I ever made, there were many resistors. However, with every potential bad ad on the table, I seemed to be the only resistor trying not to make it. Own your vision and make it happen.
  9. Production: The production process can be a very complex element of the project. Remember, you have zero expertise in any production area. Do not even pretend you do. Your main role is to deliver as close to the original script that was approved, while managing the tone to ensure it fits with the brand. During the shoot, try to get more options than you need, just in case it looks different in the final edit room.
  10. Post Production: As you move to the post-production stage, you become even less of an expert. Many clients decide to stay close to their account person. I believe you should talk directly with every expert (editors) you work with. The personal approach will enable you to get the most out of each of the experts. Your greatness happens through their greatness.

As a brand leader, my bias is to be creatively led, with media trailing. Yes, it’s fine to have a lead media choice in mind. However, as for secondary media choices, I hate forcing a given media choice on the creative team, only to find out it does not work. I would rather have a range of media options and see which one works best. At the start of the process, you have a few media thoughts of where it could go. As you  see the creative, you narrow down the range to what media choices seem to work best with the creative. And once you have the creative in hand, you can then make the final media decisions. 

Creative Advertising Process

 

As brand leaders, it takes a unique skill to be able to inspire, challenge, question, direct and decide, without any expertise at all. 

 

Here’s a powerpoint presentation on how to get better at Marketing Execution, looking at both the creative and media.

 

Beloved Brands: Who are we?

At Beloved Brands, we promise that we will make your brand stronger and your brand leaders smarter. We can help you come up with your brand’s Brand Positioning, Big Idea and Brand Concept. We also can help create Brand Plans that everyone in your organization can follow and helps to focus your Marketing Execution. We provide a new way to look at Brand Management, that uses a provocative approach to align your brand to the sound fundamentals of brand management. 

We will make your team of Brand Leaders smarter so they can produce exceptional work that drives stronger brand results. We offer brand training on every subject in marketing, related to strategic thinking, analytics, brand planning, positioning, creative briefs, customer marketing and marketing execution. 

To contact us, email us at graham@beloved-brands.com or call us at 416-885-3911. You can also find us on Twitter @belovedbrands

Graham Robertson Bio Brand Training Coach Consultant

 

The Volvo brand in one word: Safety">The Volvo Brand in one word: Safety

The Volvo brand in one word: Safety

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in Beloved Brands in the Market

When I am giving speeches on Marketing, I always use  the Volvo brand as a great case study. I tell the audience that I am going to do a magic trick where I predict what word they will shout back at me. I write “Safety” down on a piece of paper. I then say “what is the one word that describes the Volvo brand” and the audience yells back “SAFETY” without hesitation. 

I went to see Al Ries speak a few years ago and he challenged all marketers to get your brand down to one word. It sounded great, until I went back to my desk and started trying it out on my brands. At best I was able to get it down to a few words or a quick catch phrase. As I sat there frustrated, I realized that the effort to try to get it down to one word is a great catalyst that gets you down to a few words.  That’s a hell of a lot better than the excessively long-winded 5-page briefs or the long list of RTB’s (Reason to Believe) people want to jam in a TV ad.

“If you want to build a brand, you must focus your efforts on owning a word in the prospects’ mind. A word nobody else owns” – Al Ries

 

With today’s consumers being bombarded with 5,000 brand messages a day, the first 7 seconds that a consumer is exposed to a brand is a make-or-break moment. The brand must captivate the consumer’s mind quickly or the consumer will move on. The brand must be able to entice consumers to find out more and then motivate consumers to see, think, feel or act in positive ways that benefit the brand. I will show you how to develop a big idea that serves as the brand’s 7-second sales pitch. The Big Idea must be interesting, simple, unique, inspiring, motivating and own-able. The backbone of the Big Idea is the brand positioning that speaks to whom your brand will serve and what consumer benefits the brand will provide. To stand out within the clutter, smart brand positioning must establish your brand as better, different or cheaper. Otherwise, your brand will not be around for long.

How to find your brand's big idea

As much as people have a hard time matching up their inner motivations with their outward projection of their own personal reputation, a brand faces a similar challenge in matching up the inner thoughts inside the brain of the organization behind the brand with the outward brand reputation owned within the minds of their consumers. In psychology, there are three constructs to the brand personality, the ego, the id and the super ego. In our brand apparatus, the brand soul is used to express the inner thoughts of the brand that defines ‘what you want your brand to be’. The brand reputation is ‘what consumers think of you’ which is the outward view of the brand that resides within the minds of consumers. As the ego of the human mind works to regulate the id and super ego, the brand’s big idea serves as the stabilizer between the inner motivations of those behind the brand and the outward projection. In a stabilizer role, the big idea must adjust to the actual reputation, yet send signals to steer the consumer’s mind towards a desired reputation that exists within the brand soul. A brand finds its equilibrium when the brand soul, brand reputation and big idea are the same.

I have created a tool that helps define your brand down to the seven second brand pitch.

Seven Second Brand Pitch

From there, you should be able to narrow down to a 1-second brand pitch.

One Second Brand Pitch

For a long time, we’ve thought that brands just exist to convey a degree of consistency in the consumers mind. Yes, that helps to own a position in the marketplace. But more and more, we are also starting to realize that consistency of message acts as an internal beacon for everyone in the organization to follow.

Big Idea

I am always pushing everyone to focus:  focus on a tight target,  own one main benefit area that no one else can own and then shout it from the mountain top. The challenge here of getting what your brand stands down to one word would be the ultimate. I’d encourage you to take this on a test run and see where you get.  But the bigger point is to, learn from how obsessed Volvo is around safety.

I am yet to see any other brand that is so focused against one word like Volvo is with safety. For Volvo safety is not just a claim or demo in their TV ads, but is everything they do. But the real beauty for Volvo is their obsession with safety.

  • Volvo was long ahead of the marketplace. Volvo first started the safety angle in the 1940s and became completely obsessed in through the 1960s long before consumers cared about safety when no one was even wearing seat belts. But the market place has since caught up. This year, Car and Driver reports safety as the #1 benefit that consumers are looking for in a new car.
  • Volvo’s purpose in making safety a priority. In 1958, Volvo came up with the 3-point seat belt. Even with a patent they could have enforced and made millions, Volvo decided to share the technology with all the other car manufacturers because they believed so strongly in it. That really speaks to Volvo’s conviction and authenticity.
  • Volvo has always been way ahead of car safety regulations.  In fact, as safety became a priority with consumers, regulators looked at what Volvo was doing as the standard and then made Volvo’s advancements mandatory across other companies. In the 1990s, Volvo was ahead of the curve on the introduction of air bags and side-air bags.
    In TV ads, we got so used to seeing the crash test dummy ads re-enforcing Volvo’s ownership over safety.
  • Volvo continues to set the standard for safety today. The 2012 IIHS (Insurance Institute of Highway Safety) had 3 Volvo models in the 10 Top Safety Picks, the most of any car brand. The Euro NCAP collision test has recognize 2012 Volvo V40 as the best car they’ve ever tested, giving it the top rating of five stars in the Euro NCAP collision test.

Safety in Action

Most impressive to me that highlights Volvo’s obsession with safety is to look internally at the long list of R&D advancements over the past 70 years.

  • 1944 Safety cage
  • 1944 Laminated windscreen
  • 1957 Anchor points for 2–point safety belts front
  • 1958 Anchor points for 2–point safety belts rear
  • 1959 3–point front safety belts standard
  • 1964 First rearward–facing child safety seat prototype tested
  • 1966 Crumple zones front and rear
  • 1966 Safety door–locks
  • 1969 Inertia reel safety belts
  • 1971 Reminder safety belt
  • 1972 3–point safety belts – rear
  • 1972 Rearward–facing child safety seat
  • 1974 Multi-stage impact absorbing steering column
  • 1974 Bulb integrity sensor
  • 1975 Braking system with stepped bore master cylinder
  • 1978 Child safety booster cushion
  • 1982 “Anti–submarining” protection
  • 1986 Three–point safety belt centre rear seat
  • 1990 Integrated child safety cushion in centre rear seat
  • 1991 Side Impact Protection System
  • 1991 Automatic height adjusting safety belt
  • 1992 Reinforced rear seats in estate models
  • 1995 Integrated child safety cushion outer rear seats
  • 1997 Roll Over Protection System
  • 1998 Whiplash Protection System
  • 1998 Inflatable Curtain
  • 2001 Volvo Safety Concept Car
  • 2002 Roll Stability Control
  • 2003 New Front Structure called Volvo Intelligent Vehicle Architecture
  • 2003 Rear seat belt reminders
  • 2003 Intelligent Driver Information System
  • 2003 Inauguration of Volvo’s Traffic Accident Research Team in Bangkok
  • 2004 Blind Spot Information System
  • 2005 Door Mounted Inflatable Curtain
  • 2006 Personal Car Communicator
  • 2006 Collision Warning with Brake Support
  • 2007 Power Park Brake
  • 2007 Driver Alert Control
  • 2009 City Safety – Automatically stop car at speeds below 19 mph (31 km/h) if obstruction is detected in front of car
  • 2010 Pedestrian Detection with auto brake
  • 2012 Pedestrian airbag

True leader push themselves by attacking the brand even before competitors have a chance. Volvo is continuing to push themselves with a very visionary challenge for the year 2020 that’s squarely directed internally within Volvo.  Sure Volvo had some wiggling going on when they were bought by GM a few years ago. But since re-gaining control of the brand, they are back standing behind the word: SAFETY.

The Volvo vision statement: “Nobody should die or be seriously injured in a Volvo.”  

That speaks volumes to the obsession they’ve had for the past 70 years and to the obsessive focus for the future of Volvo!

Here’s a powerpoint presentation on how to define your brand, including the Big Idea tool.

 

Beloved Brands: Who are we?

At Beloved Brands, we promise that we will make your brand stronger and your brand leaders smarter. We can help you come up with your brand’s Brand Positioning, Big Idea and Brand Concept. We also can help create Brand Plans that everyone in your organization can follow and helps to focus your Marketing Execution. We provide a new way to look at Brand Management, that uses a provocative approach to align your brand to the sound fundamentals of brand management. 

We will make your team of Brand Leaders smarter so they can produce exceptional work that drives stronger brand results. We offer brand training on every subject in marketing, related to strategic thinking, analytics, brand planning, positioning, creative briefs, customer marketing and marketing execution. 

To contact us, email us at graham@beloved-brands.com or call us at 416-885-3911. You can also find us on Twitter @belovedbrands

 Graham Robertson Bio Brand Training Coach Consultant

These 8 analytical principles will reshape the mind of every marketer">

These 8 analytical principles will reshape the mind of every marketer

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in How to Guide for Marketers

One of the biggest skill gaps for many marketers is the ability to develop an analytical story to set up smart decisions. Analytics is not just math. Marketers either struggle to dig into the data or they struggle to tell a strategic story that summarizes the mounds of data they have gathered. Too many people get into marketing for the creative nature of brand management, but if you cannot think analytically, you will get stuck at one point. You need to be able to use facts to support your opinions or what you say will come across as an empty opinion that risks leaving a room divided. Here are the 8 principles that will help to make you a smart analytical thinker. 

Analytics Thinking

Principle #1: Use facts to support opinions or else what you say comes across as an empty opinion that leaves a room divided.



One great tool to help dig deeper is called the “Five Questions Analysis” that forces you to go deeper. Start with your opinion; then ask “so what does that mean?” to get a layer deeper. Ask it again to go one more layer deeper. Keep asking it up to five times, each time using the data analysis to move from unsubstantiated opinion to action-able insight. This tool will also help you avoid getting caught off guard with those challenging questions “Did you think about…” because you have already challenged yourself to dig in deep everywhere on your brand.

Analytics Thinking

 

Principle #2: Always find comparisons. Absolute numbers by themselves are useless.

Absolute numbers by themselves are useless. A friend of mine was at a meeting with her CEO and was asked a really tough question that she should have known, but did not have. So she said “forty percent”. And then they both stared each other for ten seconds, him not knowing if that was good or bad, and her not wanting to show any hesitation. I would not recommend blurting out a number. Analytics ThinkingHowever, I always remember this story because it really says how useless one data point really is. With every number, you have to always draw out comparisons to force yourself to find data breaks that begin to tell a strategic story. Only the relative nature to a number will you find the data break that helps you tell a story. Is 60 degrees Fahrenheit (15 degrees Celsius.) warm or cold? If it were in Canada in the middle of January, it would be a record setting heat and front-page news. Conversely, if it is the high temperature for the middle of June in Florida, it might even make the national news.

Never give a number without a relative nature. The relative comparison helps ground the data, by looking at how well it does versus prior periods, competitors, forecasts, other regions, norms or the category. Is it up, down, or flat? Use comparative indexes and cross tabulations to find the data breaks, showing the correct trend line that will help you draw the right conclusions.

Principle #3: The analytical story comes to life when you see a break in the data.




Comparative indexes and cross tabulations can really bring out the data breaks and gaps that can really tell a story. Use the “so what” technique to dig around and twist the data in unique ways until you find the point in which the data actually breaks and clear meaningful differences start to show. This is where the trend is exposed and you can draw a conclusion.

Principle #4: Analysis should start by posing hypothetical conclusions that answer “Where are we” and “Why are we he

Thinking time means asking the right questions. Since the smartest strategic thinkers ask questions, I want to introduce a 360-degree strategic model with 5 strategic questions that force you to look at the brand’s core strength, consumer strategy, competitive situation, the brand’s situation and how engaged your consumer are with the brand.

  1. What is the core strength your brand can win on?
  2. How important is the decision and how involved are consumers?
  3. What is your current competitive position?
  4. How tightly connected is your Consumer to your brand?
  5. What is the current business situation your brand faces?

Strategic Thinking

The intention of the 360-degree strategic thinking model is the starting point to force your thinking and discussions with your team. Each of the five questions has four possible answers, but the model forces you to make ONE choice for each question. What I recommend is that you gather a good cross-functional team and battle out each question. Some will be easy to answer, others will challenge the team and force both the discussion and the decision. What might seem like a small debate “whether your brand is product-led or story-led, should change your entire strategy, the focus of your investment and your brand message. Whether your brand is liked or loved should force your strategic choices to look for ways to tighten the bond with your consumers. Shifting from one competitive strategy to another should be guided by your understanding of where you stand currently in the market. Whether you brand is facing poor external business results that would drive a turnaround or whether your brand is internally creating confusion across various elements would drive the need for a brand re-alignment. And finally, as brands move to the execution stage to engage their consumers, they need to understand whether the main focus will be to drive consumer involvement or whether to drive the importance of the decision. As you start to dig in on these questions, keep pushing yourself to ask even richer and richer questions.

Principle #5: Map out what do we know, against what do we assume and what do we need to find out, to help focus deep dive.

The best Brand Leaders know when to be a strategic thinker and when to be an action thinker. Strategic thinkers see “what if” questions before seeing solutions, mapping out a range of decision trees that intersect and connect by imagining how events will play out. They take time to reflect and plan before acting, helping you move in a focused efficient fashion. They think slowly, logically, always needing options, but if go too slow, you will miss the opportunity window.

A good tool to get you thinking in terms of questions: separate your analysis into 5 buckets:

  1. What do we know? This should be fact based and you know it for sure.
  2. What do we assume? Your educated/knowledge based conclusion that helps us bridge between fact, and speculation.
  3. What we think? Based on facts, and assumptions, you should be able to say what we think will happen.
  4. What do we need to find out? There could be unknowns still.
  5. What are we going to do? It’s the action that comes out of this thinking.

Analytics Thinking

 

Principle #6: Like an old school reporter, two source of data or two data points on the trend line validates the truth of the story.

Avoid taking one piece of data and making it the basis of your entire brand strategy. Make sure it’s a real trend. Dig around until you can find a convergence of data that leads to an answer. Look to find 2-3 facts that start to tell a story, and allows you to draw a conclusion. The good pure logic in a philosophical argument they teach you is “premise, premise conclusion” so if you see one trend line, look for a second before drawing a conclusion.

Analytics Thinking

 

Principle #7: Use tools that can help organize and force deep dive actionable thinking. 

A Force Field analysis is best served for those brands in a sustaining position where marketing plays the role of driving innovation and creativity within a box. Always keep in mind that Drivers and Inhibitors are happening now. You can see the impact in the current year. Anything in the future gets moved down to Opportunities and Threats which are not happening but could happen. Invariably, people mix this up and things that could happen move up when they really shouldn’t.

Analytics Thinking

Principle #8: Turning analysis into story for management decisions

You have to know how to write an analytical slide that can help convince management of your analysis. A best-in-class analytical slide helps project the story up to your management team. It should include a captivating headline that summarizes the story, 2-3 key points that are rich in data, supporting visuals and most importantly you need to include an actionable recommendation based on the analysis. The biggest mistake I see is that brand leaders forget the actionable recommendation, thereby giving up their leadership on the brand to their boss.

Analytics Thinking

 

Good analytics get you to the point of “So what do you think”. From there, you will have to be a smart decision-maker.

 

Below is our workshop we run to help Brand Leaders improve their analytical thinking:

Beloved Brands: Who are we?

At Beloved Brands, we promise that we will make your brand stronger and your brand leaders smarter. We can help you come up with your brand’s Brand Positioning, Big Idea and Brand Concept. We also can help create Brand Plans that everyone in your organization can follow and helps to focus your Marketing Execution. We provide a new way to look at Brand Management, that uses a provocative approach to align your brand to the sound fundamentals of brand management. 

We will make your team of Brand Leaders smarter so they can produce exceptional work that drives stronger brand results. We offer brand training on every subject in marketing, related to strategic thinking, analytics, brand planning, positioning, creative briefs, customer marketing and marketing execution. 

To contact us, email us at graham@beloved-brands.com or call us at 416-885-3911. You can also find us on Twitter @belovedbrands

Graham Robertson Bio Brand Training Coach Consultant

 

 

The five stages of a 360-degree branding approach

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in How to Guide for Marketers

 

When I started out in Marketing, I remember thinking “where does it all start and where does it finally end”.  The harsh reality is that it never ends. It just keeps going. After you execute, you should analyze, which sets up your strategic thinking that could impact how you define your brand, how you build your brand plan it then impacts next year’s execution…followed by more analysis. The best Marketers of the world are strong in all five of these stages.

Creating Beloved Brands Process

Here are the five stages of a 360-degree branding approach

1, Think strategically

Strategic thinkers see “what-if” type questions before they look for potential solutions. Have you ever been a meeting and heard someone say, “That’s a good question”? This is usually a sign someone has asked an interruptive question designed to slow everyone’s brain down, so they take the time to reflect and plan before they act, to force them to move in a focused and efficient way. Strategy is the thinking side of marketing, both logical and imaginative. Strategic people are able to map out a range of decision trees that intersect, to imagine how events will play out in the future. The risk is that if they think too long, they just spiral around, unable to decide. They miss the opportunity window.

Since the smartest strategic thinkers ask questions, I want to introduce 5 strategic questions that force you to look at the brand’s core strength, consumer strategy, competitive situation, the brand’s situation and how engaged your consumer are with the brand.

  1. What is the core strength your brand can win on?
  2. How important is the decision and how involved are consumers?
  3. What is your current competitive position?
  4. How tightly connected is your Consumer to your brand?
  5. What is the current business situation your brand faces?

You will see in this model, that for each of the five questions, you are forced to pick ONE of the four potential choices.

Strategic Thinking

 

2. How to define your brand

Before you can randomly choose what the big idea for your brand will be, there is homework to be done around defining the brand positioning statement, to help decide who the brand will serve and what the brand will stand for. A smart brand positioning statement should narrow the target to those consumers who are most capable of loving what the brand does. The brand positioning should find the ideal balance between functional and emotional benefits. There are 4 elements that make up a Brand Positioning Statement, including who will you serve, where you play, where will you win and why consumers should believe you. These are the consumer target, marketplace definition, consumer benefit and support points.

  1. Who is your consumer target? What slice of the population is the most motivated by what your brand offers? Do not just think about whom you want, but rather who wants your brand.
  2. Where will you play? What is the competitive set that defines the space in the market your brand competes in? Positioning is always relative to whom you compete against. For instance, a brand is never fast, it is faster than everyone else.
  3. Where will you win? What is the main consumer benefit promise you will make to the consumer target, that will make your brand stand out as interesting, simple, unique, motivating and own-able? Do not talk about what you do (features). Talk about what the consumer gets (functional benefits), and how the brand makes them feel (emotional benefits).
  4. Why should they believe us? Understand what support points and features are needed to back up the main promise. These support points should close any potential doubts, questions or concerns the consumer has after hearing the main promise.

Brand Positioning

 

3, How to write Brand Plans every one can follow

Have you ever noticed that people who say, “We need to get everyone on the same page” rarely have anything written down on one page? The same people who use the term ‘fewer bigger bets’ are the same people who are fans of those cool little projects that deplete resources. People say they are good decision-makers, yet struggle when faced with two distinct choices, so they creatively find a way to justify doing both options. A strategic Brand Plan must force your hand in how you allocate your brand’s limited resources to ideas that drive the highest return. The plan must align everyone who works on the brand towards a common vision and goals. The plan is a decision-making tool to alignment on investment, deployment of people, key strategies, tactics, goals and projects. It should even guide the brand leader who wrote it, to deliver on all key decisions. When you start your Brand Plan, one of the worst possible things that you could do is open up a document and start to type away on a blank page. You will either get writers-block or assemble a complete mess. Remember back to when you wrote a term paper in College, the essay was always easier and better when you took the time to write out a rough draft format before you started the final document. To start, I recommend you use the five strategic questions that answers

  1. Where could we be
  2. Where are we
  3. Why are we here
  4. How can we get there
  5. What do we need to do.

With the answers to these five questions, you will start to see a draft outline of your brand vision, analysis, key issues, strategies, execution and measurement. Use the five strategic questions to write out 3 bullet points for each of the 5 strategic questions. Throughout the planning process, you should keep coming back to this document to ensure your plan tells the entire strategic story. Just before you get up and present to your management, use this worksheet to ensure your entire story flows well. You can even use this as your first slide of the presentation to guide the team through your strategic story.

Brand Plans

4. How to inspire creative execution:

All marketing execution must creativity deliver the brand story, to motivate consumers to see, think, act or feel differently than before they saw the brand message. While many executions are designed to satisfy short-term business needs, every execution must express the brand’s big idea in ways that builds the brand’s long-term reputation with consumers. If the market execution does not tighten the bond with consumers, it should be considered a failed business investment. The most creative brand leaders must inspire the experts who will produce smart and creative execution of the strategic plan, to win over consumers and move them to think, feel and act in ways that tightens the consumer’s bond with the brand. Brand leaders must figure out ways to judge creative ideas, make decisions, provide inspiring direction to the experts they employ. They must think with strategy and decide with instincts, with the goal to find work their consumers will absolutely love. Marketers have to know how to judge creative advertising to find the right balance of creativity and strategy, so the work that goes into the marketplace is both different and smart. Advertising has to be different enough to break through in a cluttered world, yet smart enough to motivate consumers in ways that help the brand. Here is a tool I call the ABC’s decision-making tool to help marketers judge what makes for great creative advertising:

  1. Gain the consumers’ Attention to break through
  2. Puts spotlight on Brandso it is remembered
  3. Communicatesbrand’s main message through story
  4. Sticks in the consumer’s mind, making the brand seem different

A brand leader must be the first to love the executions put into the marketplace. If they do not love the work, how can they expect their consumer to fall in love with the brand? The best decision-makers use a balance of instincts and strategy. I use a ‘Gut Instincts Checklist’, that looks at the love the ad, link to brand strategy, the ad’s ability to motivate consumers, to see if the creative idea the central driving force to gain attention, to showcase the brand, to communicate the brand’s main benefit and to help the brand stick in the consumer’s mind and heart.

Marketing Execution

5. How to analyze the performance of your brand

One of the biggest skill gaps for many Marketers is the ability to develop an analytical story to set up smart decisions. They either struggle to dig into the data or they struggle to tell a strategic story that summarizes the mounds of data they have gathered. They must use facts to support their opinions or what they say will come across as an empty opinion that risks leaving a room divided. Start with an opinion and then ask ‘so, what does that mean?’ to uncover insight that move from unsubstantiated opinion to action-able insight. Always draw out comparisons to find data breaks that begin to tell a strategic story. The smartest brand leader must analyze the performance of their brand. They must be able tell strategic stories through analytics. It is wise to constantly assess the brand’s situation with a deep-dive business review that helps the brand leader understand the marketplace, consumers, competitors, channels and the brand. This review helps figure out what is driving and inhibiting the brand’s growth, as well as identify the untapped opportunities and threats to future growth. This assessment sets up the strategic thinking on what should be the brand’s next move to win over their consumers.

analytics

 

If you wish to assess how well your marketing team is doing, here’s a tool using these same 5 stages. Click to download.

Beloved Brands: Who are we?

At Beloved Brands, we promise that we will make your brand stronger and your brand leaders smarter. We can help you come up with your brand’s Brand Positioning, Big Idea and Brand Concept. We also can help create Brand Plans that everyone in your organization can follow and helps to focus your Marketing Execution. We provide a new way to look at Brand Management, that uses a provocative approach to align your brand to the sound fundamentals of brand management. 

We will make your team of Brand Leaders smarter so they can produce exceptional work that drives stronger brand results. We offer brand training on every subject in marketing, related to strategic thinking, analytics, brand planning, positioning, creative briefs, customer marketing and marketing execution. 

To contact us, email us at graham@beloved-brands.com or call us at 416-885-3911. You can also find us on Twitter @belovedbrands

Graham Robertson Bio Brand Training Coach Consultant

 

How to find your brand’s big idea">How to find your brand's big idea

How to find your brand’s big idea

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in How to Guide for Marketers

Organize everything you do around your brand’s big idea

With today’s consumers being bombarded with 5,000 brand messages a day, the first 7 seconds that a consumer is exposed to a brand is a make-or-break moment. The brand must captivate the consumer’s mind quickly or the consumer will move on. The brand must be able to entice consumers to find out more and then motivate consumers to see, think, feel or act in positive ways that benefit the brand. I will show you how to develop a big idea that serves as the brand’s 7-second sales pitch. The Big Idea must be interesting, simple, unique, inspiring, motivating and own-able. The backbone of the Big Idea is the brand positioning that speaks to whom your brand will serve and what consumer benefits the brand will provide. To stand out within the clutter, smart brand positioning must establish your brand as better, different or cheaper. Otherwise, your brand will not be around for long.

How to find your brand's big idea

As much as people have a hard time matching up their inner motivations with their outward projection of their own personal reputation, a brand faces a similar challenge in matching up the inner thoughts inside the brain of the organization behind the brand with the outward brand reputation owned within the minds of their consumers. In psychology, there are three constructs to the brand personality, the ego, the id and the super ego. In our brand apparatus, the brand soul is used to express the inner thoughts of the brand that defines ‘what you want your brand to be’. The brand reputation is ‘what consumers think of you’ which is the outward view of the brand that resides within the minds of consumers. As the ego of the human mind works to regulate the id and super ego, the brand’s big idea serves as the stabilizer between the inner motivations of those behind the brand and the outward projection. In a stabilizer role, the big idea must adjust to the actual reputation, yet send signals to steer the consumer’s mind towards a desired reputation that exists within the brand soul. A brand finds its equilibrium when the brand soul, brand reputation and big idea are the same.

How to find your brand's big idea

How to find your brand’s big idea

Your big idea that becomes your 7-second pitch. I created the Big Idea Blueprint so you can define your brand’s Big Idea. How it works is you start by brainstorming the 5 areas that surround the Big Idea. On the internal Brand Soul side, you have to describe the products & services as well as the internal beacon that drives everyone who works on the brand. On the external brand reputation side, describe the ideal consumer reputation and the influencer/partner reputation. Then look at the brand role, as the enabler to bridges the internal and external sides.

How to find your brand's big idea

  1. Products and Services: What is the focused point of difference that your products or services can win on, because they meet consumer needs, and separates your brand from competitors?
  2. Consumer Reputation: What is the desired reputation of the brand, that attracts, excites, engages and motivates consumers to think, feel and purchase your brand?
  3. Internal Beacon: What is the internal rallying cry that reflects your brand’s purpose, values, motivations helping inspire, challenge and guide the culture? These words should come from your brand’s soul.
  4. Influencer Reputation: Who are the key influencers and potential partners who impact the brand? What is their view of the brand that would make them recommend or partner with your brand?
  5. Brand Role: What is the link between the consumer and the brand, reflecting the way the brand services, supports and enables the consumers to make the most out of your brand? The brand role links the internal and external sides.

Big Idea Brainstorm

With a cross-functional team that works on the brand, start the brainstorm by exposing them to all the work you have done on the brand positioning statement, including details on the target profile, brand benefits ladder work and the benefit sort work. Ask the participants to bring their knowledge, wisdom and opinions from where they sit within the organization. Start with a brainstorm of each of the 5 areas, with 15-20 key words that describe each section. Start with the products and services and brand reputation. Then, move down to the Internal beacon and influencer reputation. Once the 4 sections are complete, brainstorm 15-20 words to describe the brand role.How to find your brand's big idea

Next, vote to narrow down the list to the best 3-4 words for each section. You will begin to see a focus around certain themes and key words. Then divide your large group into mini groups and give them the task of taking the winning words and building phrases that summarize each section. Most importantly, this process will help the team move towards alignment.

How to find your brand's big idea

With all five areas complete, hopefully the team will feel inspired to use their creative energy to come up with the Big Idea, as a summary statement that captures everything you have just worked on. Try to get a few different versions of the Big Idea that you can continue to play with after the meeting. Keep pushing until you have a clearly focused big idea that bridges the internal brand soul and the external brand reputation. Equally, consumers and your internal staff should feel that it fits with where you want the brand to go.

How to find your brand's big idea

Organize Everything Around the Brand’s Big Idea

The big idea should guide everyone who works behind the scenes of the brand. Brand Leaders must manage the consistent delivery of the big idea over 5 consumer touch-points, including the brand promise, story, innovation, purchase moment and consumer experience. Whether in management, customer service, sales, HR, operations an outside agency, everyone should be looking to the big idea to guide and focus their decisions.

How to find your brand's big idea

  • Brand Promise: Use the Big Idea to inspire a simple brand promise that separates your brand from competitors, to project your brand as better, different or cheaper, expressing the brand’s positioning.
  • Brand Story: The brand story must come to life to motivate consumers to think, feel or act, while influencing the brand’s reputation that is held in the minds and hearts of the consumer. The story should align all brand communications across all media options.
  • Innovation: Build a fundamentally sound product, staying at the forefront of trends and technology to deliver innovation. This helps steer the product development and R&D teams to stay true to the Big Idea.
  • Purchase Moment: The Big Idea must move consumers through the brand funnel to make the final purchase decision. This helps steer the sales team and sets up retail channels to drive towards the sale.
  • Consumer Experience: Turn the usage of your product into a consumer experience that becomes a ritual and favorite part of the consumer’s day. The Big Idea guides the culture and everyone who work behind the brand, to deliver amazing experiences.

How to find your brand's big idea

 

To read more about brand positioning, here is our workshop that we run to help brands define themselves.

Beloved Brands: Who are we?

At Beloved Brands, we promise that we will make your brand stronger and your brand leaders smarter. We can help you come up with your brand’s Brand Positioning, Big Idea and Brand Concept. We also can help create Brand Plans that everyone in your organization can follow and helps to focus your Marketing Execution. We provide a new way to look at Brand Management, that uses a provocative approach to align your brand to the sound fundamentals of brand management. 

We will make your team of Brand Leaders smarter so they can produce exceptional work that drives stronger brand results. We offer brand training on every subject in marketing, related to strategic thinking, analytics, brand planning, positioning, creative briefs, customer marketing and marketing execution. 

To contact us, email us at graham@beloved-brands.com or call us at 416-885-3911. You can also find us on Twitter @belovedbrands. 

Graham Robertson Bio Brand Training Coach Consultant

 

How to build a purpose-driven beloved brand">

How to build a purpose-driven beloved brand

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in How to Guide for Marketers

Brand Purpose

Finding your brand purpose should help to answer the big question of “Why does your brand exist?” It should force you to explore the underlying personal and honest motivation for why you do what you do. The brand purpose can be a very powerful way to connect with both employees and consumers, helping to give your brand a soul.

Creating Beloved Brands Brand Puprose

While the diagram above looks rather crazy at first, this is a great tool for finding your brand’s purpose. This is a complex Venn diagram with four major factors, that matches up what the consumer wants, the core values that can steer your team that works behind the scenes of the brand, loving what you do and the ability to build a successful brand and business. Find your brand purpose, on the intersection of your meeting consumer needs, fulfilling you personal passion, standing behind your values, success and consumers. The reason I love this crazy Venn diagram is that the intersection of these four circles helps to crystalize the four things you need to do to use build a create a beloved brand.

1. Focus on building a tight relationship with consumers

The best brands know their consumers as well as you know your brand. Use consumer insights, enemies and needs. Build your brand plan and positioning around consumer benefits—what they get and how it makes them feel. Ask yourself, how do you describe your ideal relationship with your consumers?

2. Build around a unique, own-able and motivating big idea

The big idea is what consumers connect with first. The big idea then builds a bond as each touch-point to help deliver that big idea. Use the big idea to organize everything those working on the brand should do to deliver the benefit for your consumers—through the brand promise, story, innovation, the purchase moment and consumer experience. Behind the big idea are the elements of the brand positioning. What is the Big Idea of the brand that should inspire everyone who works behind the scenes of the brand?

3. Inspire a values driven culture to deliver happy experiences

The culture of the organization must steer the people who will deliver the experience. Your people become the face of the brand, as they deliver happy experiences that satisfy your consumers. Your people will be a major source of creating loyalty with consumers. What are the core beliefs of the brand that shape the organization as to the standards, behaviors, expectations? 

4. Use exceptional execution to become your consumer’s favorite brand

What separates good from great is the passion your people put into the work that reaches consumers. Whether it is your advertising, innovation, sales or the consumer experience you create, I believe that “I love it” is the highest bar for great work. You should create a culture where people never settle for OK when greatness is attainable. What is it that makes someone who works on your brand push themselves beyond the job, to deliver exceptional execution?

Here’s an example of how the model comes together to find your brand’s purpose.

Purpose

 

 

The soul of  your brand

Just like the soul of a human, every brand brings a unique combination of the unexplainable assets, culture, motivations and beliefs. The brand soul gathers and organizes all of the internally driven motivations and brings them together into an inspiring purpose, with a set of values and beliefs that are deeply held in the heart of everyone who work behind the scenes of the brand. From the outside eye, the complexity of an organization can appear to be a complete mess, filled with conflicts of what the brand stands for and where it should go next. Unless those conflicts are resolved and the brand is defined, the brand will fail. In an ideal world, everyone should describe the brand in the same way, whether the most remote sales rep, the technician in the lab, the ad agency or the CEO. When a brand is in trouble, the first thing I ask is “Describe the brand in 7 seconds for me” and the common answers I hear includes “I can’t” or “Well our brand is rather complicated” or “It depends who you ask”. If you cannot describe your own brand within the walls of your company, how could you ever expect a collection of consumers to describe your brand in a consistent manner?

The brand soul defines the moral fiber that explains why everyone who works on the brand ‘wakes up each day to deliver greatness on behalf of the brand’. There must be an inspiration to align them, whether a common purpose, cause or excitement for what they do. When the brand does something in conflict with the brand soul, the organization will resist and possible even reject that action as outside the cultural norms. To accept something that goes against the brand’s soul would eventually destroy the beliefs of the inner culture behind the brand. I have met brand leaders who would rather fail, than give up on their own principles and beliefs. They will say, “I don’t want to sell out just to be successful”. I respect that, because they understand themselves. A brand should be extremely personal as a trigger of personal passion for everyone who works on the brand.

Why it matters to consumers

Consumers are tired of being burned by faulty brand promises. Once lied to, their well-guarded instincts begin to doubt first, test second, and at any point, they will cast aside any brand that does not live up to the original promise that captured them on the first encounter. A brand must be worthy of love. The best brands of today have a soul that exists deep within the culture of the brand organization. The brand’s purpose must be able to explain why the people who work behind the scenes of the brand come to work everyday so energized and ready to over-deliver on the brand’s behalf. This purpose becomes an immovable conviction, with inner motivations, beliefs and values that influences and inspires every employee to want to be part of the brand. This brand conviction must be so strong; the brand would never make a choice that is in direct contradiction with their inner belief system. Consumers start to see, understand and appreciate the level of conviction with the brand.

Creating Beloved Brands

A brand’s big idea, brand soul and reputation must work together to ensure the brand shows up consistently to consumers

To learn more, here’s a presentation on how to create a beloved brand:

Beloved Brands: Who are we?

At Beloved Brands, we promise that we will make your brand stronger and your brand leaders smarter. We can help you come up with your brand’s Brand Positioning, Big Idea and Brand Concept. We also can help create Brand Plans that everyone in your organization can follow and helps to focus your Marketing Execution. We provide a new way to look at Brand Management, that uses a provocative approach to align your brand to the sound fundamentals of brand management. 

We will make your team of Brand Leaders smarter so they can produce exceptional work that drives stronger brand results. We offer brand training on every subject in marketing, related to strategic thinking, analytics, brand planning, positioning, creative briefs, customer marketing and marketing execution. 

To contact us, email us at graham@beloved-brands.com or call us at 416-885-3911. You can also find us on Twitter @belovedbrands

Graham Robertson Bio Brand Training Coach Consultant

Are you treating your best customers better than your average customers? You should be.">Creating Beloved Brands

Are you treating your best customers better than your average customers? You should be.

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in How to Guide for Marketers

I always ask this brand leaders this question, and I rarely get the right answer.

Unfortunately I usually hear, “No, we all our customers the same”or “Our system does not really allow us to treat customers differently or “We have never thought like that”.

My 19 year-old daughter, who is waitressing while going to University intuitively knows she should treat her regular customers better than everyone else. She knows it leads to bigger tips!  Then why don’t marketing professionals do it?

Are you crazy? You should be treating your best customers better. They are your “regulars”.

As a consultant, I have been lucky to travel many times around the world. I have accumulated millions of points for Air Canada. I even have the Visa Card that collects points for Air Canada. While they are a better airline than United or Delta, I can safely say that I am not treated any better than the average Air Canada passenger. Now, as a Canadian, I am relatively stuck. Or as I say sometimes, “I am in points prison” which means I have collected so many points now, that it is hard to quit the program, even if I desperately want to. Last year, after one more frustration with Air Canada, I finally asked one of their representatives “So what do I get for being such a loyal customer?” And her answer floored me: “Sorry sir, we treat all our customers the same”.

I started to wonder: So I collect all these miles so I can go on free trips with an airline that I tend to hate. Maybe I am the crazy one.

Old-school marketing no longer works

The old logical ways of marketing no longer work in today’s world. These brands feel stuck in the past talking about gadgets, features and promotions. They will clearly be ‘friend-zoned’ by consumers, to be purchased only when the brand is on sale. The best brands of the last century were little product inventions that solved small problems consumers did not even realize they had until the product came along. Old-school marketing was dominated by bold logos, catchy jingles, memorable slogans, side-by-side demonstrations, repetitive TV ads, product superiority claims and expensive battles for shelf space at retail stores. Every Marketer focused on how to enter the consumer’s mind. Marketers of the last century were taught the 4P’s of product, place, price and promotion. It is a useful start, but too product-focused and it misses out on consumer insights, brand promise, emotional benefits and consumer experiences. The Crest brand knew their “Look mom, no cavities” TV ads annoyed everyone, but knew it stuck in the consumer’s brain. No one cared how nice the Tide logo looked, as long as it stood out on a crowed grocery store shelf. The jingle “Plop, plop, fizz, fizz, oh what a relief it is” was repeated often to embed itself in the consumer’s memory bank. The side-by-side dish detergent ad showed spots on the wine glass of a competitor, just to shame consumers into using Cascade. Brands that continue to follow a logical play only, will fail miserably in today’s emotion-driven marketplace.

Creating Beloved Brands

The purchase funnel is now circular

Old School was just about getting consumers into the purchase funnel and let the rest of the people in the organization satisfy them. Knowing some consumers would fall out of the funnel, our role was to keep getting more and more people into that funnel. The new purchase funnel is a circle, where the biggest brand fans drive awareness and consideration for that brand. The best brand needs to find ways to create such happy moments for these influential ‘brand lovers’ that will make them want to tell everyone in their network. Instead of just yelling to everyone at the top of the purchase funnel, you should be whispering to your most loyal brand fans, so they whisper to their friends.

Creating Beloved Brands

Brands need to build a passionate and lasting love with their consumers.

How can brand leaders replicate Apple’s brand lovers who line up in the rain to buy the latest iPhone before they even know the phone’s features, the Ferrari fans who paint their faces red every week, even though they know they will likely never drive a Ferrari in their lifetime, the ‘Little Monsters’ who believe they are nearly best friends with Lady Gaga, the 400,000 outspoken Tesla brand advocates who put $1,000 down for a car that does not even exist yet or the devoted fans of In-N-Out Burger who order animal-style burgers off the ‘secret menu’ that no one else knows about? Every brand should want this type of passion and power with their consumers. It takes a smart strategy to balance the rational and emotional management of the brand-to-consumer relationship. Yes, these brands are all special. What makes them so special is how well they treat their most loyal consumers. They make them feel loved.

The consumers of today must be cherished and ‘won-over’. Consumers are surrounded by a clutter of 5,000 brand messages a day that fight for a glimpse of their attention. That is 1.8 Million per year, or one message every 11 waking seconds. Consumers are constantly distracted—walking, talking, texting, searching, watching, replying—most times at the same time. They glance past most brand messages all day long. Their brain quickly rejects boring, irrelevant or unnecessary messages. Brands must capture the consumer’s imagination right away, with a big idea that is simple, unique, inspires and creates as much excitement as a first-time encounter.

Consumers are tired of being burned by faulty brand promises. Once lied to, their well-guarded instincts begin to doubt first, test second, and at any point, they will cast aside any brand that does not live up to the original promise that captured them on the first encounter. A brand must be worthy of love. The best brands of today have a soul that exists deep within the culture of the brand organization. The brand’s purpose must be able to explain why the people who work behind the scenes of the brand come to work everyday so energized and ready to over-deliver on the brand’s behalf. This purpose becomes an immovable conviction, with inner motivations, beliefs and values that influences and inspires every employee to want to be part of the brand. This brand conviction must be so strong; the brand would never make a choice that is in direct contradiction with their inner belief system. Consumers start to see, understand and appreciate the level of conviction with the brand.

Brands must listen, observe and start to know the thoughts of their consumer before they even think it. Not only does the brand meet their functional needs, the brand must heroically beat down the consumer’s ‘enemy’ that torments their life, every day. The brand must show up consistent at every consumer touch-point, whether it is the promise they make, the stories they tell, the innovation designed to surprise consumers, the happy purchase moments or the delightful consumer experiences that make consumers want to tell their friends about. The consumer keeps track in the back of their mind to make sure it all adds up before they commit. Only then, will the consumer become willing to open up and trust the brand. The integrity behind the brand helps tighten the consumer’s unshakable bond with the brand. Brands have to do the little things that matter, to show they love their consumer. Every time the brand over-delivers on their promise, it adds a little fuel to the romance each and every time. Over time, the brand must weave itself into the most important moments of the consumer’s lives, and become part of the most cherished stories and memories within their heart.

The pathway to brand success comes from building relationships with consumers

The best brands of today engage in a strategy that follows a very similar path to the rituals of a courtship. Through the eyes of consumers, brands start as complete strangers and if successful, they move into something similar to a trusted friendship. As the consumer begins to open up, they allow their emotions to take over and without knowing, they begin to love the brand. As the brand weaves itself into the best moments of the consumer’s life, the consumer becomes an outspoken fan, an advocate and one of the many ‘brand lovers’ who cherish the brand. From the strategic mind of the marketer, this follows a very similar pattern to the strategies of a successful courtship. The brand could move into a position where the consumer sees it as a forever choice.

To replicate how brand building matches up with the building of a relationship, I created the Brand Love Curve, as consumers move through five stages that includes unknown, indifferent, like it, love it and onto the beloved brand status.

It takes a strategic mind to figure out brand love
I first came up with the idea when I ran a marketing department with 15 different brands that exhibited various degrees of success. Honestly, it w as hard for me to keep track of where each brand stood. I did not want to apply a one-size-fits-all type of strategy to brands who had dramatically different needs. I could have used some traditional matrix with market share versus category growth rates, or stuck with revenue size or margin rates. But every day on the job, I came back to the idea about how tightly connected the specific brand was with their consumer. I could clearly see that those brands that delivered a stronger bond with their consumer outperformed those brands that did not have that kind of connection. I wanted a unique way I could map out the level of emotional bond between brands and consumers.

Creating Beloved Brands

The Brand Love Curve helps make strategic choices

I started to see how the Brand Love Curve influenced the strategic choices that will create success for the brand. For ‘unknown’ brands, the strategic focus should be to stand out so consumers will notice the brand within a crowded brand world. For ‘indifferent’ brands, the strategy must establish the brand in the consumer’s mind so they can see a clear point of difference. At the ‘like it’ stage, the strategy is to build a trust with each happy, and find ways for consumers to connect to the brand emotionally in ways that motivate them to buy and want to be part of a movement or a following. At the ‘Love It’ stage, the focus shifts to tug at heartstrings that will tighten bonds with the most loyal brand fans. At the ‘Beloved’ stage, the strategic challenge is to create outspoken loyal fans, which will whisper to their friends on the brand’s behalf.

Creating Beloved Brands

The Brand Love Curve can also inspire how you write your annual brand plan, with an inspirational emotional brand vision and purpose to guide the team, or the selection of strategies that are suited to where the brand sits on the curve. Here are 20 potential brand strategies that you should focus on, based on where your brand sits on the curve.

Creating Beloved Brands

The tighter the bond you can create with your consumers, the more power and profit you can generate for your brand.

 

To learn more, here’s a presentation on how to create a beloved brand:

Beloved Brands: Who are we?

At Beloved Brands, we promise that we will make your brand stronger and your brand leaders smarter. We can help you come up with your brand’s Brand Positioning, Big Idea and Brand Concept. We also can help create Brand Plans that everyone in your organization can follow and helps to focus your Marketing Execution. We provide a new way to look at Brand Management, that uses a provocative approach to align your brand to the sound fundamentals of brand management. 

We will make your team of Brand Leaders smarter so they can produce exceptional work that drives stronger brand results. We offer brand training on every subject in marketing, related to strategic thinking, analytics, brand planning, positioning, creative briefs, customer marketing and marketing execution. 

To contact us, email us at graham@beloved-brands.com or call us at 416-885-3911. You can also find us on Twitter @belovedbrands

Graham Robertson Bio Brand Training Coach Consultant

 

Oh how I yearn for the “BIG WOW” creative that seems to have left  the world of advertising

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in How to Guide for Marketers

big creative execution neat vs wow

What am I missing? 

I keep looking at a lot of so-called ‘great marketing’ of today, and I think “ok”, but where oh where is the “Big Wow, oh my god I wish I made that stuff!!!”

  • Let me define BIG WOW creative ideas as the work that makes our eyes go wide and we immediately shout out “Wow!” while we secretly think “I want to make that one!!!”
  • Let me also define the “small/neat” creative as little marketing gadgets and tricks that make us say, “Hey, that’s pretty neat”.

The reality is that a brand needs both big and small creative. I have always been a fan of the small neat stuff. When I launched the dishwasher tabs, I created a sell-sheet that used elastic bands to create a 3 dimensional tab once the sel-sheet was open. Apparently, the buyer at our largest customer took that sell sheet around the office showing all the other buyers. But, that’s small/neat stuff. I enjoyed it, but never got overly excited.

Big work is exciting.

After 20 years in Brand Management, I have vivid memories of each time I saw a “BIG WOW” idea for one my brands. I can remember where I was and how it felt. I was also lucky enough to work on some amazing campaigns. I remember one of the creative guys stood up with around 30 boards under his arm for one TV ad, and I wanted to make it after he presented the 9th board. I remember seeing another in this small room that was the top floor of an antique book store. My brand team had mistakenly put in the brief “no funny ads”, yet we left that book store laughing our asses off and made one of the best ads I have ever been part of. I can remember everyone who resisted every idea I ever managed to get on air. There were always more who resisted the truly great work, while sadly, on most of the OK work we were about to make, I always seemed to be the only resistor. That should tell you something.

With all the clutter of small ideas, it seems too many brand leaders think they need lots of small ideas. Pretty soon the media market looks like a cluttered community bulletin boards where every brand is content to just have you grab their phone number.

Are the media choices getting in the way of big creative?

Everyone loves the Oreo tweet in the middle of the Super Bowl. Sure. while the moment was “pretty neat” and likely had the Oreo team giggling, it really is just a small, neat idea that went viral. Everyone giggled and shared it. But is it a Big Wow? Paying a celeb to tweet about your product is pretty cool, but it’s not really big creative. Oreo Super Bowl AdJust cutting a check. A Facebook ad that pops up on the side of your laptop in a “3/4 inch square” is about as exciting as a bench ad outside a bus stop. I am on Twitter all the time. It feels like the modern-day version of junk mail. There’s too much, all telling me I can get stuff for free. Each time I open Twitter, I just see a collection of messy stuff. Do not get me started on SEO sales people. I equate them with air-duct sales people. Maybe I am getting old and I am missing the golden age of great creative.

Oh how I miss those TV ads that offer the ideal combination of sight, sound, story telling. They can make you laugh, give you goosebumps or even make you cry. Maybe, we just in a valley of creativity as we adjust to some of these new media choices. But now, you cannot convince me that most of the work out there is pretty crappy. Sadly, it just bores me.

Are we too fixated on big data proof? 

I once approved a campaign that failed miserably in testing. It was just too different for consumers to truly grasp. But my gut feel said it was the right way to go. The campaign lasted 10 years, and doubled the market share of the brand. Sure, I was scared. It was early in my career and the resistance was incredible. I would have surely been tossed out if it failed. That level of risk/reward excitement never exists on the small stuff. Is there a conflict between taking a chance on something and needing the big data to prove that it is correct? Sometimes your gut feel knows more than the data that reflects the history of work, not the future.

Marketers tense up when the work get “too different”

Great advertising must balance the creativity and smart. Advertising has to be different enough to break through in a cluttered world, yet smart enough to motivate consumers to see, think, feel or act in ways that help the brand. One problem I see for Marketers is they tense up when the creative gets ‘too different’. In all parts of their business, Marketers relax when they can see past proof that something will work. Unfortunately, when it comes to advertising, if the ads start to look like what other brands have already done, then the advertising will get stuck in the clutter.

Marketing Execution Big Smart Ideas Wow

When it gets too familiar, it bores consumers and it will fail to break through. Brand Leaders should actually be scared when the ads seems “too familiar”. You have to push the work and take a chance to ensure your ad breaks through. The advertising must also be smart in delivering the desired brand strategy in moving consumers to see, think, feel or do, while expressing a brand positioning that can form a future brand reputation. The ideal sweet spot is being both smart and different. Smart without different will not even break through the clutter. Different but not smart might be entertaining but will not do anything for the brand. Push yourself to find Smart and Different.

My baseball analogy: “Swing for the fences. It feels amazing”

In baseball, I rarely hit home runs. I was a singles spray hitter. (an Al Oliver wannabe) I likely hit 10 over the fence in 1,000 at bats in my entire life. But I can tell you that as the ball leaves the bat, your hands turn to mush. Oh, what a feeling. Now, that is the level of excitement I want to see from the Big Wow creative. All this small stuff is terrific, but that’s just a bunt single.

I believe the Big Wow ideas will energize a team, give them the guts to take more chances. Creativity is infectious to the spirit of the team. Get your nose out of the charts and look up into the sky.  Find work that will make your hands going mush and make you scream “WOW”.

Show me some big wow stuff that will make my heart beat wildly and make me scream “WOW” again.

To read more about how to create amazing marketing execution, here is our workshop we run:

 

Beloved Brands: Who are we?

At Beloved Brands, we promise that we will make your brand stronger and your brand leaders smarter. We can help you come up with your brand’s Brand Positioning, Big Idea and Brand Concept. We also can help create Brand Plans that everyone in your organization can follow and helps to focus your Marketing Execution. We provide a new way to look at Brand Management, that uses a provocative approach to align your brand to the sound fundamentals of brand management.

We will make your team of Brand Leaders smarter so they can produce exceptional work that drives stronger brand results. We offer brand training on every subject in marketing, related to strategic thinking, analytics, brand planning, positioning, creative briefs, customer marketing and marketing execution.

To contact us, email us at graham@beloved-brands.com or call us at 416-885-3911. You can also find us on Twitter @belovedbrands.

Beloved Brands Graham Robertson

 

How Marketers can be better strategic thinkers">

How Marketers can be better strategic thinkers

Posted on Leave a commentPosted in How to Guide for Marketers

I always joke that strategic people share similar traits to those we might consider lazy, cheap or conniving. Rather than just dive into work, strategic people will spend an extraordinary amount of time thinking of all the possible ways for them to get more out of something, while you exert the least possible effort or waste their own money. After thinking of every possible option, strategic people have this unique talent to make a firm decision on the best way forward. They are great at debate because it appears they already know the other options you might raise, and they already know why that option will not work as well. And, the thing about strategic people, is they get away with it.

How to use smart strategic thinking in Marketing

 

Smart strategic thinkers see the right questions before they look for answers, while instinctual thinkers see answers before they even know the right question.

I see a big difference between strategic thinking and intuitive leaders. Strategic thinkers see ‘what-if’ type questions before they look for potential solutions. Have you ever been a meeting and heard someone say, “That’s a good question”? This is usually a sign someone has asked an interrupting question designed to slow everyone’s brain down, so they take the time to reflect and plan before they act, to force them to move in a focused and efficient way. Strategy is the thinking side of marketing, both logical and imaginative. Strategic people are able to map out a range of decision trees that intersect, to imagine how events will play out in the future. The risk is that if they think too long, they just spiral around, unable to decide. They miss the opportunity window.

How to use smart strategic thinking in Marketing

On the other hand, instinctual leaders just jump in quickly to find answers before they even know the right question. Their brains move fast, they use emotional impulse and intuitive gut feel. These people want action now and get easily frustrated by delays. They believe it is better to do something than sit and wait around. They see strategic people as stuck running around in circles, as they try to figure out the right question. Instead, they choose emotion over logic. This “make it happen” attitude gets things done, but if they go too fast, their great actions may solve the wrong problem. Without proper thinking and focus, an action-first approach might just spread the brand’s limited resources randomly across too many projects. Intuitive leaders can be a creative mess and find themselves with a long to-do list, unable to prioritize or focus.

How to use smart strategic thinking in Marketing

Brand leaders must learn how to change brain speeds.

They must move slowly when faced with difficult strategy and quickly with their best instincts on execution. A brand leader’s brain should operate like a racecar driver, slow in the difficult corners and go fast on the straightaway. You must slow down to think strategically. Did you ever think that the job might get in the way of thinking about how to do your job better? With wall-to-wall meetings, constant deadlines and sales pushes, you have to create your own thinking time.

Find your thinking time

You should block off a few hours each week, put your feet up on the desk, and force yourself to ask really difficult questions. Pick one problem topic for each meeting you book, and even invite a peer to set up a potential debate. The goal is not to brainstorm a solution, but to come up with the best possible question that will challenge the team. Even go for walks at lunch or a drive somewhere just to get away from it all. My best thinking never came at my desk in front of my computer. Too many marketers have their head down in the numbers they miss the obvious opportunities and threats that are right on the horizon. Strategic thinkers should assess, question and consider every element that can impact your business. Here is a simple 4-step process to run a strategic thinking meeting:

  1. Vision: Every brand and even every project should start with a longer-term vision that maps out the ideal state of where you want to go. Push yourself beyond the normal expectations. Always focus on ways to create a bond with your consumers to build a group of brand lovers.
  2. Situation: Brand leaders must know the immediate situation of the brand, so they can constantly analyze and assess the potential changes could happen with consumers, competitors, and channels that could impact the health and wealth of your brand. Without the deep and rich strategic thinking discipline, you risk moving too quickly on brand strategy, unable to see the insights that may be hidden beneath the surface. You solve the wrong problem. It is crucial to use the analysis to know how tight the bond you have created with consumers, to know where your brand sits on the brand love curve.
  3. Key Issues: Brand leaders must understand the issues in the way of the stated vision. This includes the drivers, inhibitors, risks and opportunities. Think of both immediate and longer-term issues. As stated, strategic thinkers see questions before they see solutions. In this process, frame the key issues as an interrupting and challenge question.
  4. Strategic direction: Strategies are answers to the questions that your situational analysis and key issues raised. They are never randomly selected. All this strategic thinking is wasted if you cannot make a decision. You should be an intellectual philosopher not a business leader. Do not tell yourself you are a good decision-maker if you come to a decision point and always choose both. The best brand leaders force themselves to focus. They use the word “or” more than they use the word “and”. Strategic thinkers never divide and conquer out of fear. They force themselves to make choices to focus and conquer.

Learn to change your brain speeds. Go slow with strategy and fast with execution.

To read more on How Marketers can be better strategic thinkers, click on this powerpoint presentation that forms one of our workshops. My hope is that it challenges you to think differently about your own brand situation:

Beloved Brands: We make brands stronger and brand leaders smarter.

We will unleash the full potential of your brand. We will lead a 360-degree assessment of your business, help you define your Brand Positioning, create a Big Idea that will transform your brand’s soul into a winning brand reputation and help you build a strategic Brand Plan everyone who works on the brand can follow.

We will make your team of Brand Leaders smarter so they produce exceptional work that drives stronger brand results. We offer brand training on strategic thinking, brand analytics, brand planning, brand positioning, creative briefs and marketing execution.

To contact me, call me at 416 885 3911 or email me at graham@beloved-brands.com

Beloved Brands Graham Robertson