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That was not the Best Super Bowl…for ads either

superbowl-2014-logoWell, we know from the start that was not the best game.  I would say the half time show was great and hopefully Bruno Mars gained some new fans around the world.  But for those of us watching the TV ads, they weren’t that good.  There were quite a few mediocre ones, and a few copy cats of their own campaigns but not as good as the prior year ads.  I’m a big fan of Advertising, so trust me I wanted to like them more than I did. There just wasn’t an ad that we’ll talk about for five years, not like the Betty White Snickers ad or the Dodge Farmer Ad.  If you liked the ads better than I did, feel free to tell me which ones and why.

Here are the best ones:

Coke “America”

I really liked the Coke ad.  It’s quiet, but I think it stands out among all the gag style ads where brands appear to be trying too hard.  It has sparked some controversy on-line with a few people objecting to “America the Beautiful” being sung in various languages. But Coke is as global of a company as you can find.  So this not only speaks to Americans but all those around the world looking at Coke as being that link to America.  I’d give this a solid A, mainly because I think it takes guts to do this ad.

 

Doritos “Finger” 

This is a very good ad, fitting with the personality of the brand, and a cute gag that is sure to make us all laugh. It also involves the brand nicely.  I’d give it an A-.  It’s cute, but we might not remember this one a year from now.

 

Heinz “Bottle”

It’s great to see Heinz make a move onto the big stage.  They’ve struggled the past few decades, once we figured out their taste could be duplicated. But this really ties in perfectly to the heritage of the brand, and even given a new modern twist.  It’s cute and let’s give it a nice B+.

 

Budweiser “Puppy”

This one seems to be winning all the on-line votes for best ad, that might be indicative that there was nothing great. I might be over-thinking this one, but doesn’t it seem a lot like last year’s Budweiser spot where the horse kept running back to the owner.  While last year’s brought a tear to my eye, this one just made me smile. I’m going a solid B.

 

Here’s last year’s Budweiser ad.  Don’t you think it’s similar, and better. Still makes me cry.

Budweiser “Home Coming”

This was pretty good, just not amazing. I’m not sure it tugged at the heart enough.  Feels like we’ve seen others over the years that were better. I’d give it a solid B.

 

The rest of the ads were C’s and D’s, maybe a few F’s.  Here’s to a better game for next year, and better ads.  I realize we aren’t going to get Dodge “Farmer”.  To me, this is one of our best ads of the century so far. Here’s what an A+ looks like.

 

Here’s to next year’s game.  May it bring better football and better ads.


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Do you want to be an amazing Brand Leader? We can help you.

Read more on how to utilize our Brand Leadership Learning Center where you will receive training in all aspects of marketing whether that’s strategic thinking, brand plans, creative briefs, brand positioning, analytical skills or how to judge advertising.  We can customize a program that is right for you or your team.  We can work in person, over the phone or through Skype.  Ask us how we can help you.

At Beloved Brands, we love to see Brand Leaders reach their full potential.  Here are the most popular article “How to” articles.  We can offer specific training programs dedicated to each topic.  Click on any of these most read articles:

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Is Social Media is the new “Invisible Hand”?

Brand LeadershipWell, today is a picture perfect weather day.  Sunny, which is rare, no humidity even rarer this spring, and likely 80 degrees.  It’s a sunday, a lazy one after a few tough weeks of work.  I feel like it’s a rejuvenation day. where we can shut down our brain.  That’s why I’ve picked the geekiest of topics to write about comparing an 18th century economist in Adam Smith with the modern-day world of Social Media.

The Original “Invisible Hand”

The concept of Adam’s Smith’s “Invisible Hand”  can be summarized to say that the individuals’ efforts to maximize their own gains in a free market benefits society, even if the ambitious have no benevolent intentions.  In economics, the “invisible hand” of the market is the term economists use to describe the self-regulating nature of the marketplace. This is a metaphor first coined by the economist Adam Smith. 529423_272713376142007_1735862437_nThe exact phrase is used just three times in his writings, but has come to capture his important claim that by trying to maximize their own gains in a free market, individual ambition benefits society, even if the ambitious have no benevolent intentions. My economics professor once said “economics is the practice of proving what happens in real life can also happen in theory”.  I love that line.  So how we as marketers spin the invisible hand is that we have to know that consumers are greedy, and if we satisfy that greed better than others, our brand will be more powerful and more profitable.

Consumers have the right to be greedy because they have money and options for how to spend that money.  Like Gordon Ghekko said “GREED IS GOOD”.  It’s this greed and the ability of some brands to satisfy that greed better than other brands which separates “likeable” brands from “beloved” brands.  As a marketer, I think greed helps you understand the needs of the customer, it forces you to rise and meet their expectations and it pushes you to beat your competitor for that almighty dollar the consumer could use on either you or them.  Fight for it.

Is Social Media the new “Invisible Hand”?

Over the last 5-10 years, Social Media has been the obvious marketing phenomena.  But do we fully understand it yet?  For most Brand Leaders, it still seems hit and miss.  I mean some of the leading cooler brands like Coke, Nike, Starbucks and Whole Foods are doing an amazing job.  But we see others not doing so well.  Arguably if Facebook hasn’t even figured out how to fully monetize itself, then how would Brand Leaders be able to figure it out.

The “invisible hand” of social media is actually hard to explain.  Just like it took Adam Smith 20= years of research, it might be the same for social media.  By no means am I a social media expert guru.  I’m as confused as the rest.  But what I do preach is the more love you can generate for your brand, the more power you can command and then you can turn that power in profit.Slide1

So my new message to every brand leader, if you want to be loved, you need to engage.  You need to be telling your story, your purpose, your passion and do so in a way that the consumer know you are genuine.  if you have no voice then you give control of you brand to the consumer.  We have seen so many bad cases like Motrin or Kitchen Aid to see what happens when a brand loses control.

Take someone like Whole Foods who has an amazing brand.  They use Twitter to perfection, offering constant recipes and engaging with their most loyal of consumers.  They don’t have any real off-line advertising.  All the energy is generated through on-line word of mouth.   Starbucks, a brand built on word of mouth seemed confused by social media a few years ago has now picked up tremendous steam the last year to where they are also a huge success story. And Apple does such an amazing job they get 2.5 billion of free media a year.

Brand Leaders View of Social Media

A few thoughts from one brand leader to another. Forget all the social media experts just for one minute.  We can approach them once we figure things out.  So here goes:

  1. Your media choice has to be influenced by your brand strategy.  This was true in 1920 when we only had print and signs.   It’s still true now that we have 3,000 media options.  You don’t just randomly select activities.  What other part of your life do you do that?   So then why would you do it in marketing.  Let the tactics match up to the strategy, not just do a bunch of random activities and then try to write a strategy to it.Slide1
  2. Media Plans should also map out the life of your consumer and the media choices be driven by where the consumer is, not where the media is.  A great day in the life analysis has always helped find where to interrupt your consumer with your message.   If you knew that the consumer was awake for 16 hours a day and sees 6,000 messages each day, that means we see a new message every 10 seconds.  Which 10 seconds do you think would be the best of the day for you?Slide1
  3. Don’t put out crap.  Please don’t. Please hire a professional to help you.  It seems people are in more of a rush than ever to put stuff out.  But sometimes when you go too fast, it takes longer.   Please do a strategic creative brief.  Give the creative people enough time to do great work.  If you are going to get into story telling, you should have a purpose driven strategy at the anchor.  You should really know why you come to work every day and once you do, bring that purpose into all your stories you tell.  The “why” is such a powerful message.
  4. Be Interesting, but equally you should be interested.  If you’re going to engage with consumers, don’t just talk about yourself.  Ask them questions that get them talking about themselves.   Instead of serving up what you do constantly, speak in the voice of the consumer and tell them what they get.   No one cares what you do until you care about what they get.
  5. You need to focus.  A brands resources are confined by money, time and people. That’s still true.  Social Media IS NOT free.  Because it takes time and it takes people resources to do it right.   You don’t have to be on Facebook because your nephew thinks you’re a loser.  You should be on it because it’s where your consumer is likely to be motivated the most to engage with your consumer.  Focus on those social media options that most make sense for your brand. 

Now, and only now should you go approach a social media “expert” who will help you figure out how to translate your brand strategy at the social media area, who will map out where your consumer is so you know where/when and how to interact with them.  Make sure you put out quality still.   Crap is always crap.  If you’re going to tell stories and engage, then make sure it’s from the heart.  Honestly means knowing your real purpose of why you chose this business and the struggles you went through.  And finally, I want you to focus.  I know I sound like a broken record.  But if you focus on every other part of your life, then why when it comes to marketing do you all of a sudden thing “it’s ok to cover everything”.   When the discipline of marketing is all about focus.

If you want your brand to be loved, then you have to be engaged in Social Media.  If you are not involved in the conversation about your brand, you’re giving up control to the pack.  And who knows what they’ll say.  

Social Media is more likely the “Invisible Voice” we can’t always hear, but we better start realizing it is there and engaging our own voice.
 

Follow me on Twitter at @grayrobertson1

Here’s a presentation that can help Brand Leaders to get better Media Plans.  

 
Other Stories You Might Like
  1. How to Write a Creative Brief.  The creative brief really comes out of two sources, the brand positioning statement and the advertising strategy that should come from the brand plan.  To read how to write a Creative Brief, click on this hyperlink:  How to Write a Creative Brief
  2. How to Write a Brand Plan:  The positioning statement helps frame what the brand is all about.  However, the brand plan starts to make choices on how you’re going to make the most of that promise.  Follow this hyperlink to read more on writing a Brand Plan:  How to Write a Brand Plan
  3. Turning Brand Love into Power and Profits:  The positioning statement sets up the promise that kick starts the connection between the brand and consumer.  There are four other factors that connect:  brand strategy, communication, innovation and experience.   The connectivity is a source of power that can be leveraged into deeper profitability.  To read more click on the hyper link:  Love = Power = Profits

 

Brand LeadershipI run the Brand Leader Learning Center,  with programs on a variety of topics that are all designed to make better Brand Leaders.  To read more on how the Learning Center can help you as a Brand Leader click here:   Brand Leadership Learning Center

Pick your Social Media vehicle and follow us by clicking on the icon below:

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To reach out directly, email me at graham.robertson@beloved-brands.com

About Graham Robertson: The reason why I started Beloved Brands Inc. is to help brands realize their full potential value by generating more love for the brand.   I only do two things:  1) Make Brands Better or 2) Make Brand Leaders Better.  I have a reputation as someone who can find growth where others can’t, whether that’s on a turnaround, re-positioning, new launch or a sustaining high growth.  And I love to make Brand Leaders better by sharing my knowledge.  Im a marketer at heart, who loves everything about brands.  My background includes 20 years of CPG marketing at companies such as Johnson and Johnson, Pfizer Consumer, General Mills and Coke.  My promise to you is that I will get your brand and your team in a better position for future growth. Add me on LinkedIn at http://www.linkedin.com/in/grahamrobertson1 so we can stay connected.

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Happy Valentines: A Love Story For Brand Leaders

Why Does Love Matter for a Brand?

Today is all about love.  And while you might be buying some flowers or chocolate for the one you love, what are you doing to show your consumer that you love them?   How do you expect them to love you, if you don’t show them a little bit of love.  

Here’s a cute ad that Coke, one of the most beloved brands, is doing to celebrate the day with their consumers.  

More Love Means More Profits

Brand Leaders are thinkers and don’t always feel comfortable getting all emotional.  They don’t have time for fluff, because they have a bottom line to hit.  How many times have we heard: “keep it simple, show my product shot, say my superiority claim, show a demo and the product will sell itself”.  

But what if I told you that the more love you can generate for your brand, the more money you will make.  Does that sound like crazy talk?

The Brand Love Curve

In the consumer’s mind, brands sit along a hypothetical Brand Love Curve, going from Indifferent to Like It to Love It and finally becoming a Beloved Brand for Life. 

Love Curve Detailed

The farther along the curve the deeper the connection.  At the beloved stage, demand becomes desire, needs become cravings, and thinking is replaced with feelings.  Consumers become outspoken fans.  That connection helps drive a positional power for your brand—a power versus competitors, customers, suppliers and even versus the very consumers that love you.  With that power, consumers will pay more, use more and follow where the brand goes next.   All this love goes straight to the bottom line. 

Brand Love: 

Marketers keep debating what makes a great brand.  Is it the product, the advertising or even the experience?  There are 5 sources of Brand Love: the brand promise, experience, strategy, innovation and the communication of the brand story.   

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The brand’s promise must be relevant, simple and compelling enough to connect. A brand can only be better, different or cheaper.  Otherwise it won’t be around for very long.  The most beloved brands are based on an idea worth loving.  The strategic choices should start with where the brand is on the Brand Love Curve and finding ways to create a deeper connection.  Externally, the promise is delivered through communication, but just important the brand acts as an internal beacon to the culture and the R&D.   The brand story expresses the promise in a compelling way, whether through paid media, earned, social and search.  The experience created by the culture has to over-deliver the brand promise. Freshness of innovation, keeps the brands one-step ahead of competitors.   Every new product should tie back to the brand promise.   Execution in every facet matters:  you have to love what you do.   If you don’t love the work how do you expect your consumer to love your brand?

 

Brand Power: 

Once you create love with your consumer, the key is turning that love into power. 

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That starts with a power over the very consumers that love them.  The most loyal users line up in the rain for new products, promote and defend the brand, pay the price premium and even follow the brand to new categories.  With this connection, beloved brands have a power over channels, as people would rather switch stores than switch brands.  There’s a power over the media. Not only can you afford more paid media, you can generate more free media: earned, social or search media.  Apple generates over a billion dollars of free media via the mainstream media and social media.  Beloved Brands have a power over employees that want to be part of the brand who intimately know and bring a passion to the brand before they even start.

Brand Profit:

Because the brand is now tied more to how you feel than just the product, there’s a direct impact on the P&L. 

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The most beloved brands create momentum as crowds follow crowds, turning it into share gains.  Consumers follow the Brand into new categories.   The price is inelastic with loyal brand fans pay a 20-30% price premium and even the weakened channels and take lower margins.  In terms of costs, suppliers will cut their price to be on the brand’s roster, and higher volumes lower cost of goods.  With higher share, new categories, an inelastic price and lower cost structure, the most beloved brand can turn the connection into growth profits. 

 

The formula for a Beloved Brand is simple:
Beloved = Power = Growth = Profit

 

So maybe it’s time for Brand Leaders to start asking: “And how will this make our consumers love my brand”

 

 

Here’s a summary on Creating a Beloved Brand: 

 

Other Stories You Might Like
  1. How to Write a Creative Brief.  The creative brief really comes out of two sources, the brand positioning statement and the advertising strategy that should come from the brand plan.  To read how to write a Creative Brief, click on this hyperlink:  How to Write a Creative Brief
  2. How to Write a Brand Positioning Statement.  Before you even get into the creative brief, you should be looking at target, benefits and reason to believe.   To read how to write a Brand Positioning Statement, click on this hyperlink:  How to Write an Effective Brand Positioning Statement
  3. Turning Brand Love into Power and Profits:  The positioning statement sets up the promise that kick starts the connection between the brand and consumer.  There are four other factors that connect:  brand strategy, communication, innovation and experience.   The connectivity is a source of power that can be leveraged into deeper profitability.  To read more click on the hyper link:  Love = Power = Profits 

Brand LeadershipI run the Brand Leader Learning Center,  with programs on a variety of topics that are all designed to make better Brand Leaders.  To read more on how the Learning Center can help you as a Brand Leader click here:   Brand Leadership Learning Center

Pick your Social Media vehicle and follow us by clicking on the icon below

 linkedin-groups-large             images-1              facebook-logo

To reach out directly, email me at graham.robertson@beloved-brands.com

About Graham Robertson: The reason why I started Beloved Brands Inc. is to help brands realize their full potential value by generating more love for the brand.   I only do two things:  1) Make Brands Better or 2) Make Brand Leaders Better.  I have a reputation as someone who can find growth where others can’t, whether that’s on a turnaround, re-positioning, new launch or a sustaining high growth.  And I love to make Brand Leaders better by sharing my knowledge.  Im a marketer at heart, who loves everything about brands.  My background includes 20 years of CPG marketing at companies such as Johnson and Johnson, Pfizer Consumer, General Mills and Coke.  My promise to you is that I will get your brand and your team in a better position for future growth. Add me on LinkedIn at http://www.linkedin.com/in/grahamrobertson1 so we can stay connected.

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Ten Best Super Bowl Ads of All Time

Super-Bowl-47-LogoEven though I’m almost over the Patriots loss from last weekend, let’s start Super Bowl week off with a tribute to all the great Super Bowl ads over the years.  

I hope a few of these spots bring back some good memories for you and if there are any special ones missing for you, feel free to add them in the comments.  

Coke “Mean Joe Greene” (1979)

Bit of that 1970s “cheese” for you, but I remember this one from my teens.  The spot has become as iconic as the drink itself.  

Apple 1984 (1984)

Great story of this ad in the Steve Jobs book–how the board never wanted to run it and they lied about the media commitment.  This was one of the first big Super Bowl ads, that changed the way advertisers saw the Super Bowl slots.    

Diet Pepsi Michael J Fox (1987)

A little bit of that “Back to the Future” feel of the 1980s Michael J Fox.  Very cute tone is a good fit for Pepsi.    

McDonald’s Jordan vs Bird (1992)

This one had a lot of break through and left us with the phrase “nothing but net”.  The current Tiger Woods/Rory McIlroy spot uses (steals) the same formula.  

Cindy Crawford “New Can” (1992)

Not much needs to be said about this one, other than that they repeated this 10 years later and she still looked the same.  

Budweiser: WASSUP! (1999)

The simplicity of this one, but it really does capture a male-bonding insight of how guys do interact with their buddies.  

FedEx “Pigeons”

FedEx has been using sarcastic humor to make their point for years.  This spot has a good feel with the FedEx tone.  

Snicker’s Betty White (2010)

Whatever Betty was paid, she’s made millions since because of this spot.  Quickly after this one, the power of a Facebook page demanded that Betty host Saturday Night Live.  A great little spot, one that Snicker’s has yet to fully capture in their pool outs on this campaign.   

Chrysler Eminem (2011)

I love the tone of this spot, perfect casting with Eminem–the rawness of his voice, attitude and authenticity.  The repeat in 2012 using Clint Eastwood was a good spot as well, but not quite up to the Eminem version.  “Imported from Detroit” is a very big idea.  Love it.  

Budweiser 9/11 Tribute (2002)

Even after all these years, this one might bring a tear to your eye.  Months after the tragedy of 9/11, this one takes the American icons of Budweiser and the Clydesdales marching through the streets of America and gives a nice salute to NYC.  

Good luck to this year’s Super Bowl, as many of us will be watching the TV ads as much as we’re watching the game.  The power of the venue as the Super Bowl out draws the final game of the other 3 sports (Baseball, Basketball and Hockey) combined.  

And I lied: I’m not quite over the Patriots loss yet.  

What’s Your Favorite Super Bowl Ad of all time?

To see a training presentation on getting better Advertising: 

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Do you want to be an amazing Brand Leader?  We can help you.

Read more on how to utilize our Brand Leadership Learning Center where you will receive training in all aspects of marketing whether that’s strategic thinking, brand plans, creative briefs, brand positioning, analytical skills or how to judge advertising.  We can customize a program that is right for you or your team.  We can work in person, over the phone or through Skype.  Ask us how we can help you.

At Beloved Brands, we love to see Brand Leaders reach their full potential.  Here are the most popular article “How to” articles.  We can offer specific training programs dedicated to each topic.  Click on any of these most read articles:

Ask Beloved Brands to run a workshop to find your brand positioning or ask how we can help train you to be a better brand leader.
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Some of the Best Christmas Ads I’ve Seen

cropped-new-logo  v2Christmas is a great time to drive home the connection between consumers and the brand.  But not everyone can pull it off.  You likely need to have an established love for your brand already or it would come across as lacking authenticity.  Brands here like Coke, Kellogg’s, Budweiser, Tim Horton’s, Canadian Tire and even Target have strong emotional connectivity that they can use at this time of year.   But the boss of Christmas season has to be John Lewis who every year comes out with something huge.  Some get too wrapped up in making sure they sell product at the same time.  That’s a complete turn-off.

John Lewis

The best Christmas ads I’ve ever seen are from John Lewis, the department store in the UK.  They use beautiful music, a movie-like storyline that demonstrates the beauty of gift giving, stretched out over 90 seconds.    No words are needed to tell the story.  They are not loaded with so much branding that they would turn you off before inviting you in.  They tug at the heart and bring a reminder of what the season is all about:  the gift of Giving. 

I think this is the best one in the John Lewis (2011) series so far, with a nice twist at the end.

This is also a great one from 2010

 

And finally, you can see the one from 2009, which really shows that over the 3 years, they’ve been able to create this ownable idea for themselves.

 

But then, this year’s John Lewis Christmas ad is a bit different.  As people have started to watch for the next great John Lewis Christmas ad (myself included), I guess they have to push the creativity, but this isn’t quite what I was hoping for.  A bit too dark for me, a bit disconnected from the John Lewis brand or the series of ads over the past 5 years.  While a nice story, I think it’s a miss.  But the next one is only 11 months away.

 

I may be wrong, so if you love the new John Lewis ad, tell me you love it.

Coke

Coca Cola, the brand who came up with the look of how we see Santa Claus, makes a special ad every Christmas, to recreate the magic of Christmas.  Here’s a few great ones over the years:

From Argentina, here’s a brilliant take on spreading the joy of the season.  It’s a powerful message from a brand that has always owned Christmas.  

 

A very wholesome TV ad by Coke where life takes place in a snow globe.

 

And here’s a cute one…

Budweiser

The Budweiser Clydesdales were first introduced to the public in 1933, to celebrate the repeal of Prohibition.   August A. Busch Jr. presented the hitch as a gift to his father.   And that hitch proceeded to carry the first case of post-Prohibition beer.  Every Christmas you’ll see a team of Clydesdales pulling a case, a great icon of the American beer brand.

 

Not technically a Christmas ad because it air during the Super Bowl, but Clydesdales always make you think of Christmas.  This ad was aired just a few months and will give you goose bumps even a decade later.

Canadian Tire

This is your classic sentimental Christmas ad, talking about family.  It’s done very well by retailer Canadian Tire.   They told a nice story, about the modern family.

Tim Horton’s

This ad will make you cry just a little bit.  A nice touch of reality about being a parent from the old school to the new school.

Kellogg’s

A pretty darn whole ad, but pretty darn cute.  We do need a bit of wholesome serotonin at this time of year.

Target

The Target lady makes me laugh every time.  While everyone else is using kids in a tear-jerking sentimental way, Target uses humor and makes the art of getting the deal the idea.   Perfect fit for their value based positioning.  This Target Lady in red is adorable, representing the cheesiest of shoppers in all of us.

 

 

 

What’s the best Christmas ad you’ve seen?

 

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If you are in the mood to see other great advertising, here’s a few other stories:

 

To see a training presentation on getting better Advertising: 

 

If you or team has any interest in a training program, please contact me at graham.robertson@beloved-brands.com

About Graham Robertson: I’m a marketer at heart, who loves everything about brands.  My background includes 20 years of CPG marketing at companies such as Johnson and Johnson, Pfizer Consumer, General Mills and Coke. The reason why I started Beloved Brands Inc. is to help brands realize their full potential value by generating more love for the brand.   I only do two things:  1) Make Brands Better or 2) Make Brand Leaders Better.  I have a reputation as someone who can find growth where others can’t, whether that’s on a turnaround, re-positioning, new launch or a sustaining high growth.  And I love to make Brand Leaders better by sharing my knowledge. My promise to you is that I will get your brand and your team in a better position for future growth. To read more about Beloved Brands Inc., visit http://beloved-brands.com/inc/   or visit my Slideshare site at http://www.slideshare.net/GrahamRobertson/presentations where you can find numerous presentations on How to be a Great Brand Leader.  Feel free to add me on Linked In at http://www.linkedin.com/in/grahamrobertson1  or on follow me on Twitter at @GrayRobertson1

I run Brand Leader Training programs on this very subject as well as a variety of others that are all designed to make better Brand Leaders.  Click on any of the topics below:

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Coke’s Futuristic Fountain Experience Thrills Consumers

When I was a kid, it was so much fun to go up to the pop fountain and combine every flavour: a little bit of Coke, a bit of Sprite and Orange or Root Beer and back to the coke for a bit more.  But Coca Cola Freestyle takes that to the next level by combining art, science, entertainment and design to give you up to 100 options to make the fountain drink of your choice.  These new machines, in mostly high-profile locations, not only give you a drink, but a fun and very cool interactive experience.

First you choose your drink from among 20 choices.

With the Coca Cola Freestyle, I walked up to this big huge wall where I had a touch screen choice of about 20 different drink options–Coke, Diet Coke, Sprite, Coke Zero, Minute Maid or Root Beer.  So I hit Coke Zero.  And then I had a choice of 8 different flavour version options of Coke Zero–Lime, Orange, Lemon, Cherry, Vanilla etc.  So I hit Orange.  As my drink filled up, I could smell the rich orange flavouring coming from my Coke.  I never had Orange Coke before.  It was a bit different but I loved the variety.   Who knows what I’d get next time, but it sure keeps the Coke love affair alive.

Coke is definitely one of the most Beloved brands on the planet.  At the Beloved stage, the marketing effort has to shift to separating yourself on the experience you can create for your consumer.   How many more times can Coke say “Coke Is It”?   With this Freestyle fountain, Coca Cola has been able to leverage a unique technology to allow them to surprise and delight their consumers.  “Coca-Cola Freestyle represents a complete departure from anything consumers have experienced before,” says Nicola Kettlitz, President, Coca-Cola Ltd.  “The state-of-the-art technology provides unparalleled opportunities to engage and interact with consumers while we continue to provide the high quality, great tasting beverages we are known for.”

Then you choose your flavour alteration from among 8 choices.

Forbes has even declared Coca Cola Freestyle as one of the coolest products of the decade.  The experience is fuelled by an innovative and award-winning technology.  Coca-Cola Freestyle creates brands by blending concentrated beverage ingredients with water and sweetener at the point where the beverage is dispensed.  The recipes for each brand have been tested and perfected to deliver a consistent product with every selection.  The technology that is leveraged in Coca-Cola Freestyle also provides significantly more flexibility in adding new beverages and helping consumers more efficiently manage their beverage business.  For you supply and demand geeks, these machines also are to transmit data to both Coca-Cola and the owner including the brands sold and flavours, and even the times of the day of the sales.

Coca Cola Freestyle is a unique way to bring fun and adventure to the Coke brand.

About Graham Robertson:  I’m a marketer at heart, who loves everything about brands. I love great TV ads, I love going into grocery stores on holidays and I love seeing marketers do things I wish I came up with. I’m always eager to talk with marketers about what they want to do.   I have walked a mile in your shoes.  My background includes CPG marketing at companies such as Johnson and Johnson, Pfizer Consumer, General Mills and Coke.  I’m now a marketing consultant helping brands find their love and find growth for their brands.  I do executive training and coaching of executives and brand managers, helping on strategy, brand planning, advertising and profitability.  I’m the President of Beloved Brands Inc. and can help you find the love for your brand.  To read more about Beloved Brands Inc, visit http://beloved-brands.com/inc/

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