Category: Beloved Brands in the Market

10 Best Super Bowl Ads ever

We have looked at all the Super Bowl Ads over the years, and used Ad Meter results to narrow the list and then our own judgement on how it did on the ABC’S: Attention, Branding Communication and Stickiness. At Beloved Brands, we believe that Marketing Execution combines Branded Breakthrough (how you say it) and Moveable Messaging (what you say). Taking this one step further, the execution has to breaks through the clutter (Attention) and link closely to the brand name (Branding). The execution must communicate the main message (Communication) and makes brand seem different (Stickiness)
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Here are the top 10 Super Bowl ads of all time. Enjoy.

Coke “Mean Joe Greene” (1979)

Bit of that 1970s “cheese” for you, but I remember this one from my teens. Strong on Communication through story-telling and Stickiness. The spot has become as iconic as the drink itself.

Apple 1984 (1984)

Great story of this ad in the Steve Jobs book–how the board never wanted to run it and they lied about the media commitment. This was one of the first big Super Bowl ads, that changed the way advertisers saw the Super Bowl slots. Movie Quality of the filming does a great job in gaining Attention and Stickiness as it has stood the test of time for 30 years. A bit weak on communication, but that might have more to do with the lack of things to say about the product, so they led more with brand image and attitude as the core distinctiveness.

McDonald’s Jordan vs Bird (1992)

This one had a lot of break through and left us with the phrase “nothing but net”. With these two celebrities at their peak, it was high on Attention, strong story telling, pretty good branding and had some phrasing that had some stickiness for years 

Cindy Crawford “New Can” (1992)

Not much needs to be said about this one, other than that they repeated this 10 years later and she still looked the same. Definitely Attention getting with a very simple message Communication that helped drive Brand link. Not a lot of stickiness for consumers.

Budweiser: WASSUP! (1999)

The simplicity of this one, but it really does capture a male-bonding insight of how guys do interact with their buddies. Hilarious ad was exceptional at Attention and certainly Stickiness as everyone was saying this phrase for a year. Didn’t really communicate much.

Budweiser 9/11 Tribute (2002)

Even after all these years, this one might bring a tear to your eye. Months after the tragedy of 9/11, this one takes the American icons of Budweiser and the Clydesdales marching through the streets of America and gives a nice salute to NYC. High on Attention, with deep emotions, strong Brand cues, and certainly the story telling aided the Communication. Even though only shown once, high on Stickiness as it still really brings back those emotions. 

Google “Parisian” (2009)

Beautiful ad that shows the power of Google as an enabling brand to your life. A great example of using quietness to drive Attention. The Branding is obviously incredible, but as it links nicely to the story telling that Communicates how Google is part of everyone’s life. The emotional feelings certainly aid the Stickiness. This is one of the best Ads I’ve ever seen. 

Snicker’s Betty White (2010)

Whatever Betty was paid, she’s made millions since because of this spot. Quickly after this one, the power of a Facebook page demanded that Betty host Saturday Night Live. A great little spot that was incredible on Attention and Stickiness. The Communication is a Big Idea for the brand and kick-started a campaign that has lasted for years, even if Snicker’s has yet to fully capture in their pool outs on this campaign.

Chrysler Eminem (2011)

I love the tone of this spot, perfect casting with Eminem–the rawness of his voice, attitude and authenticity. The repeat in 2012 using Clint Eastwood was a good spot as well, but not quite up to the Eminem version. “Imported from Detroit” is a very big idea. Love it. High on Attention and Communication. The only problem is that Chrysler hasn’t invested enough in this idea since. 

Ram “farmer” (2013)

One of my fav ads of all time, and takes such a huge artistic risk by launching such a quiet ad that really tugs at the heart, when most other brands are doing slapstick ads. The shrill voice of Paul Harvey captures the Attention, especially against all the slapstick ads. The Communication of “Americana” comes through, and whether you’re a farmer or not, if you are a hard-working American, this should be your truck!!!

 

Good luck to this year’s Super Bowl, as many of us will be watching the TV ads as much as we’re watching the game. The power of the venue as the Super Bowl out draws the final game of the other 3 sports (Baseball, Basketball and Hockey) combined. Let’s hope for a great game and maybe one great ad to add to this list.

At Beloved Brands, we run a workshops to train marketers in all aspects of marketing from strategic thinking, analysis, writing brand plans, creative briefs and reports, judging advertising and media. To see a WORKSHOP ON MARKETING EXECUTION, click on the Powerpoint presentation below:

Beloved Brands: Who are we?

At Beloved Brands, we promise that we will make your brand stronger and your brand leaders smarter. We can help you come up with your brand’s Brand Positioning, Big Idea and Brand Concept. We also can help create Brand Plans that everyone in your organization can follow and helps to focus your Marketing Execution. We provide a new way to look at Brand Management, that uses a provocative approach to align your brand to the sound fundamentals of brand management. 

We will make your team of Brand Leaders smarter so they can produce exceptional work that drives stronger brand results. We offer brand training on every subject in marketing, related to strategic thinking, analytics, brand planning, positioning, creative briefs, customer marketing and marketing execution. 

To contact us, email us at graham@beloved-brands.com or call us at 416-885-3911. You can also find us on Twitter @belovedbrands

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Coke’s new Ad campaign has more fizzle than sizzle

coke-taste-the-feeling-1I have been impressed with Coke’s Marketing execution the past couple of years. I love the Coke Freestyle machines where you can customize your own drink from up to 100 options. And I have to admit loving the names on the bottle, even though I had my doubts in the beginning. All that great stuff, and yet the sales have been sluggish for the past 15 months. It’s not the activity that is at fault. It’s just that people want healthier options and Coke is now fighting against that major consumer movement away from Sugary or Aspartame drinks. Sugary cereals are going through the same crisis. But since Coke can’t “fix” the health trend, they may as well try to fix the activities–even if it’s not broken. 

With the earnings report showing that Coke’s revenue has fallen for the past 3 straight quarters, I can only imagine the CEO walking down the hall to find the CMO and say “we need your Advertising to sell more product”. 

At Beloved Brands, we believe that Advertising can only move one body part at a time: the head, the feet, the heart or the soul.Creative Brief 2016 Extract.001

Here’s a great example of a Coke ad idea called “Remove labels this Ramadan” that really touches the consumer’s soul. Even with 19 Million views, it likely didn’t sell a lot of Coke.

To me, an Advertising idea is like a magnet. When it gets too far away from the brand, it no longer moves the brand. The “share happiness” campaign was a huge umbrella idea, but likely so huge, the one thing it didn’t do is move product. 

Today, Coke announced two moves in rolling out their new “Taste the Feeling” advertising campaign. First, you will see in the work that they are clearly linking life moments with drinking Coke. Meaning the creative team was told: “we have to SELL MORE PRODUCT”. Or as I would say, the ads have to move feet.  Second, they announced they would have ONE Master Brand creative idea for all 3 Coke products, red Coke, Diet Coke and Coke Zero.

Here is the main spot Coke launched today, appropriately called Anthem.

I would say it’s an OK spot, not a great spot. For a 90 second spot called “Anthem” it lacks the emotional appeal you would expect, and it won’t really generate any viral share-ability. It has a lot of product shots, but not really the connectivity needed to move product. And I barely even noticed any Diet Coke or Coke Zero. 

To evaluate advertising, we use something we call the ABC’S, which stands for Attention, Branding, Communication and Stickiness. I’d say these score low on attention, moderate on branding, modest on communication and pretty low on stickiness. These type of spots that show a lot of consumer moments to a song usually end up as wallpaper that falls into the background of our multi-tasking lifestyle. There’s no real compelling story here.Marketing Execution 2016.055

Here’s another TV ad called “What is Coke for?”

Again, a bit generic. No emotional pull. Lots of Coke fizzle. And hard to find the Diet Coke or Coke Zero. 

The print does a better job in capturing emotion than the TV, showing how Coke fits in to various moments of your life. 

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Here’s a challenge to Coke, if you are going to name your new spot “Anthem”. make sure it is as epic as this 1971 TV ad: 

Do you think this new campaign will increase Coke’s revenue?

Here’s a workshop we run on how to get better Marketing Execution. In this workshop, we go through how to come up with an Executional brief, based on both positioning and strategy, we take you through how to judge the work and how to provide motivating feedback to your agencies.

We make Brands stronger.

We make Brand Leaders smarter.™

BBI ads for 2015.011We offer brand coaching, where we promise to make your brand better by listening to the issues, providing advice that challenges you, and coaching you along a strategic pathway to reaching your brand’s full potential. For our brand leader training, we promise to make your team of brand leaders better, by teaching sound marketing fundamentals and challenging to push for greatness so that they can unleash their full potential. Feel free to add me on Linked In, or follow me on Twitter at @belovedbrands If you need to contact me, email me at graham@beloved-brands.com or phone me at 416 885 3911Positioning 2016.081

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New John Lewis 2015 Christmas ad released: I love it!!!

imagesThis year’s John Lewis Christmas ad was released today at 8am. We know this time because the ads have become so famous around the world and so popular that John Lewis actually had a release time, and one of the UK papers created an online countdown clock. 

 

Well, this year’s ad certainly does not disappoint. While each year, the ads have been highly creative, the 2015 version is a nice throwback to the 2010 and 2011 ads that created the magic simply through the eyes of the children in the ads. The emphasis is on giving. You will see there is not a lot John Lewis in any of these ads, but there is a certain degree of ownership. First, there is a certain unmistakeable style with a child, the home, parents and then something magical. Rachel Swift, head of brand marketing at John Lewis, says “It is has become part of our handwriting as a brand. It’s about storytelling through music and emotion. The sentiment behind that hasn’t changed – and that is quite intentional. The strategy behind our campaigns is always about thoughtful gifting.”

Here is this year’s spot.

Yes, the man on the moon is a metaphor (sorry, there really isn’t a man on the moon) for reaching out and giving someone a gift. The literal in you may wonder why a man on the moon. Hint: John Lewis ads are not for the literal. They are an escape where you can link to your own life. For me, this ad quickly reminds me of when my own kids are on the phone or FaceTime with my mom. There is a certain magic in the innocence and simplicity when the very young talk with older people. They both seem to get it, maybe sometimes more than the in-between ages where the innocence of Christmas is lost within their busy schedules. My favorite John Lewis spot has always been the 2011 version, but this new “Man on the Moon” spot is now my new fav!!!  Thank you for making it. Here are the John Lewis spots from the last few years and you can tell me which one you like the best.

2014:  Monty the Penguin:

Here is the one from 2011, about the boy who couldn’t wait for Christmas. You will notice this year’s Man on the Moon feels very similar. 

This is also a great one from 2010

And you can see the one from 2009.

In 2012, the “snowman” ad felt bit too dark for me with the tone feeling like a slight miss for John Lewis. I felt they were trying too hard.  Maybe feeling the pressure to keep the campaign alive by being different when really the consumer just wants the fast-becoming-familiar-John-Lewis-magic each year.

I also found the 2013 ad a bit of a departure, going to animation and utilizing on-line and in-store media. This campaign seems trying too hard to capitalize on their success. Doesn’t feel like a fit. 

Christmas is 8 weeks away. Expect to see this spot a lot on your social media feed. But, also expect the other UK retailers to compete as they did last year.  Here’s a link to what the other retailers did in 2014:  UK retailers always do the best Christmas ads.

John Lewis ads have become one of the favorite parts of the Holiday season

Here is a powerpoint presentation of a workshop we lead on Advertising:

We make Brands better.

We make Brand Leaders better.™

We offer brand coaching, where we promise to make your brand better by listening to the issues, providing advice that challenges you, and coaching you along a strategic pathway to reaching your brand’s full potential. For our brand leader training, we promise to make your team of brand leaders better, by teaching sound marketing fundamentals and challenging to push for greatness so that they can unleash their full potential. Feel free to add me on Linked In, or follow me on Twitter at @belovedbrands If you need to contact me, email me at graham@beloved-brands.com or phone me at 416 885 3911

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The best Political Ad this year is for a guy not even in the race (yet)

29913743001_4538072987001_video-still-for-video-4538052437001At Beloved Brands, we look at all types of brands and see what we can learn. We’ve done a few on politics this year, but you’ll notice that we never pick sides. If you can’t see straight when reading a branding article about politics, I suggest you stop reading. I’m just a marketer so this article will only talk about political brands, not about the policies of politics. Plus, I’m Canadian so I’m not even a voter in the US–I can remain objective.

Yes, the Donald Trump brand has clearly captivated America, dominated the media, polarized the electorate and rallied those who hate politics. What I like best about Trump is that his campaign has a Big Idea: Trump has a focused 7-second Big Idea brand message, that’s easily explained and understood. “Make America great again”. But Trump’s communication strategy has been largely based on provocative comments in the media, his Twitter handle and some great one-liners at the debates.

But the best ad I’ve seen this year has to go to someone not even in the race:  Joe Biden. This ad ran during the Democratic Debate last night and again this morning during the morning newscast. It’s paid for by DraftBiden, a super-PAC trying to garner momentum behind his candidacy for President.

Joe is a great storyteller, with amazing natural warmth. This ad uses one of Joe’s speeches, telling a story of his dad and how the lessons he learned impacts his fight for the average working American. It reminds me of the Dodge Ram’s “God Made a Farmer” Super Bowl ad, which used a similar style of photos over top of a Paul Henry’s voice. The quietness of the ad captures your attention and the story holds your attention. It’s not really going to change your view on Joe Biden, or Hillary Clinton. It’s targeted to Joe’s biggest supporters to get them to hold off committing to a candidate until Joe makes his inevitable entrance into the race.

Interestingly enough, this ad is a replacement for another emotional ad, using Joe’s voice telling another story. But Draft Biden pulled the ad after an aide to the vice president expressed Biden’s desire for the ad not to run, saying it tread on “sacred ground.”  It featured the story of Biden’s personal experience with tragedy after the death of his first wife, Neilia, and 1-year-old daughter Naomi in a 1972 car crash. Watch below and you can see how this might be a bit “too personal”.

Politically, Joe is likely the backup plan should Hillary Clinton stumble. But these are beautiful ads.

Below is a workshop we run on “How to get great Advertising”: 

We make Brands stronger.

We make Brand Leaders smarter.™

We offer brand coaching, where we promise to make your brand better by listening to the issues, providing advice that challenges you, and coaching you along a strategic pathway to reaching your brand’s full potential.

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For our brand leader training, we promise to make your team of brand leaders better, by teaching sound marketing fundamentals and challenging to push for greatness so that they can unleash their full potential. Feel free to add me on Linked In, or follow me on Twitter at @belovedbrands If you need to contact me, email me at graham@beloved-brands.com or phone me at 416 885 3911New 2015 Bio .001

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Volvo owns one word in describing their brand: Safety

images“If you want to build a brand, you must focus your efforts on owning a word in the prospects’ mind. A word nobody else owns”  – Al Ries

I went to see Al Ries speak a few years ago and he challenged all marketers to get your brand down to one word. It sounded great, until I went back to my desk and started trying it out on my brands. At best I was able to get it down to a few words or a quick catch phrase. As I sat there frustrated, I realized that the effort to try to get it down to one word is a great catalyst that gets you down to a few words. That’s a hell of a lot better than the excessively long-winded 5-page briefs or the long list of RTB’s (Reason to Believe) people want to jam in a TV ad.

For a long time, we’ve thought that brands just exist to convey a degree of consistency in the consumers mind. Yes, that helps to own a position in the marketplace. But more and more, we are also starting to realize that consistency of message acts as an internal beacon for everyone in the organization to follow.

I am always pushing everyone to focus: focus on a tight target, own one main benefit area that no one else can own and then shout it from the mountain top. The challenge here of getting what your brand stands for down to one word would be the ultimate. I’d encourage you to take this on a test run and see where you get. But the bigger point is to, learn from how obsessed Volvo is around safety.

When you ask consumers one word to describe Volvo, without hesitation they say “Safety”.  

headerI am yet to see any other brand that is so focused against one word like Volvo is with safety. For Volvo safety is not just a claim or demo in their TV ads, but is everything they do. But the real beauty for Volvo is their obsession with safety.

  • Volvo was long ahead of the marketplace. Volvo first started the safety angle in the 1940s and became completely obsessed in through the 1960s long before consumers cared about safety when no one was even wearing seat belts. But the market place has since caught up.  
  • Car and Driver reports safety as the #1 benefit that consumers are looking for in a new car.
  • Volvo’s purpose in making safety a priority. In 1958, Volvo came up with the 3-point seat belt. Even with a patent they could have enforced and made millions, Volvo decided to share the technology with all the other car manufacturers because they believed so strongly in it. That really speaks to Volvo’s conviction and authenticity.
  • Volvo has always been way ahead of car safety regulations. In fact, as safety became a priority with consumers, regulators looked at what Volvo was doing as the standard and then made Volvo’s advancements mandatory across other companies.  In the 1990s, Volvo was ahead of the curve on the introduction of air bags and side-air bags.  
  • In TV ads, we got so used to seeing the crash test dummy ads re-enforcing Volvo’s ownership over safety.
  • Volvo continues to set the standard for safety today. The IIHS (Insurance Institute of Highway Safety) had 3 Volvo models in the 10 Top Safety Picks, the most of any car brand. The Euro NCAP collision test has recognize Volvo V40 as the best car they’ve ever tested, giving it the top rating of five stars in the Euro NCAP collision test.

Volvo_S80_safetyMost impressive to me that highlights Volvo’s obsession with safety is to look internally at the long list of R&D advancements over the past 70 years.

  • 1944 Safety cage
  • 1944 Laminated windscreen
  • 1957 Anchor points for 2–point safety belts front
  • 1958 Anchor points for 2–point safety belts rear
  • 1959 3–point front safety belts standard
  • 1964 First rearward–facing child safety seat prototype tested
  • 1966 Crumple zones front and rear
  • 1966 Safety door–locks
  • 1969 Inertia reel safety belts
  • 1971 Reminder safety belt
  • 1972 3–point safety belts – rear
  • 1972 Rearward–facing child safety seat
  • 1974 Multi-stage impact absorbing steering column
  • 1974 Bulb integrity sensor
  • 1975 Braking system with stepped bore master cylinder
  • 1978 Child safety booster cushion
  • 1982 “Anti–submarining” protection
  • 1986 Three–point safety belt centre rear seat
  • 1990 Integrated child safety cushion in centre rear seat
  • 1991 Side Impact Protection System
  • 1991 Automatic height adjusting safety belt
  • 1992 Reinforced rear seats in estate models
  • 1995 Integrated child safety cushion outer rear seats
  • 1997 Roll Over Protection System
  • 1998 Whiplash Protection System
  • 1998 Inflatable Curtain
  • 2001 Volvo Safety Concept Car
  • 2002 Roll Stability Control
  • 2003 New Front Structure called Volvo Intelligent Vehicle Architecture
  • 2003 Rear seat belt reminders
  • 2003 Intelligent Driver Information System
  • 2003 Inauguration of Volvo’s Traffic Accident Research Team in Bangkok
  • 2004 Blind Spot Information System
  • 2005 Door Mounted Inflatable Curtain
  • 2006 Personal Car Communicator
  • 2006 Collision Warning with Brake Support
  • 2007 Power Park Brake
  • 2007 Driver Alert Control
  • 2009 City Safety – Automatically stop car at speeds below 19 mph (31 km/h) if obstruction is detected in front of car
  • 2010 Pedestrian Detection with auto brake
  • 2012 Pedestrian airbag

True leader push themselves by attacking the brand even before competitors have a chance. Volvo is continuing to push themselves with a very visionary challenge for the year 2020 that’s squarely directed internally within Volvo. 

Volvo brand vision: Nobody should die or be seriously injured in a Volvo.  

That speaks volumes to the obsession they’ve had for the past 70 years and to the obsessive focus for the future of Volvo!

At Beloved Brands, we use the Big Idea as a way to simplify and explain the Brand Soul. As consumers face 5,000 brand messages every day and having a simple Big Idea allows the consumer to connect with it. We can see above how Volvo lives and breathes Safety in every part of their organization. The more work you do as a marketer to ensure everything lines up behind your big idea, you’ll be able to move your brand to the place where your brand’s reputation and your brand’s soul are the same. 

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What can you learn from this for your brand?

Below is a presentation of our workshop we run on brand positioning:

We make Brands stronger.

We make Brand Leaders smarter.™

We offer brand coaching, where we promise to make your brand better by listening to the issues, providing advice that challenges you, and coaching you along a strategic pathway to reaching your brand’s full potential.BBI ads for 2015.005

For our brand leader training, we promise to make your team of brand leaders better, by teaching sound marketing fundamentals and challenging to push for greatness so that they can unleash their full potential. Feel free to add me on Linked In, or follow me on Twitter at @belovedbrands If you need to contact me, email me at graham@beloved-brands.com or phone me at 416 885 3911

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Can Donald Trump manage his outspoken chaos and win?

The Donald Trump brand has clearly captivated America, dominated the media, polarized the electorate and rallied those who hate politics. And it’s now rallying those who hate Trump.

It has confused the political pundits and media experts, who are in shock that he’s leading the polls. Trump’s performance raises lots of questions: Can Trump keep up his controversial voice over the next 16 months, without self-destructing or wearing out his audience? Can Trump increase his following from that of a niche “challenger” type brand to being a mass “leader” type brand? While Trump now has a following, can he overcome his huge negatives and actually win? 

At Beloved Brands, we look at all types of brands and see what we can learn. This is our first politician we’ve covered, so bear with us. If you can’t see straight when reading a branding article about Trump, I suggest you stop reading. I’m just a marketer so this article will only talk about the Trump brand, not about the Trump politics. Plus, I’m Canadian so I’m not even a voter.

Love him or hate him. Trump 2016 is fascinating and offers plenty of lessons for brand leaders either running a brand or trying to create their own personal brand.

As Marketers, what can we learn from Trump?

  • Trump has a focused and clearly defined target market and he is not afraid to alienate those not in his target. We will call Trump’s core target market the “grumpy old men”, who are mad at all the changes over the years that have weakened America. But Trump is now connecting with a broader group of “disenfranchised Americans” that have struggled over the past 15 years. Trump has shown no fear of going after the enemy of his target:  illegal immigration. It’s a hot button with the “grumpy old men” but also for those “disenfranchised”. But the immigration policy is highly risky, potentially alienated many hispanic voters, who are approximately 22% of voters. While the issue reduces the size of “where will Trump play” to 78% of voters, his calculation likely assumes he’d be no where without that issue. The lesson for marketers: never be afraid to alienate consumers as long as you are passionately connecting with your core consumers. I once had a Brand Leader tell me that their target market was, “18-65, new potential customers, current customers and employees”. My sarcastic response was, “you’ve left out tourists and prisoners?” Every brand has limited resources (financial, people, time, partners) and spreading those limited resources across an entire population is resource prohibitive. While targeting everyone “just in case” might safe at first, it’s actually less safe because you never get to see the full impact. Realizing not everyone can like you is the first step to focusing all your attention on those that can love you. Trying to be everything to anyone ends up being nothing to everyone. Be honest in assessing your brand’s assets and then match those assets up to who is most likely to be motivated enough to buy your brand.
  • Trump is “different”. While every politician takes the “I’m an outsider to Washington” strategy, normally it’s said by a Governor or Senator–who are just as bad as those inside the beltway of DC. Trump is the only true outsider–never having ventured into politics in his life. When people lay claim to come from industry, Trump can own this, since he truly is industry. Beyond the classification, Trump comes across as the anti-politician, almost saying and doing everything “wrong”, but that’s part of his “charm”. The lesson for marketers: Brands have four choices: better, different, cheaper or not around for very long. You have to take a stand on finding what makes you unique. Unless you have a true technical advantage, being different is a much more powerful space to own than trying to be better, especially when it’s difficult to prove that you are better. When I look at market research, one number I love to look at is “made the brand seem different”. 
  • Trump has a focused 7-second Big Idea brand message, that’s easily explained and understood. 885734_1280x720“Make America great again” speaks to the idea that he wants to turn back the clock to a different time–likely to the 80s and 90s when American capitalism of Ronald Regan and Bill Clinton made America the one super power in the world. It’s an idea and not just a slogan. What’s Jeb’s brand in 7-seconds? His website say “I’m Jeb Bush and I’m asking for your support”. There’s not even a benefit in that statement.  Trump’s idea stands out as it will alienate the liberal left that organized and supported the Occupy movement a few years ago. Heck, Trump is the 0.000001% and makes no apologies for it. The lesson for marketers: are you able to describe your brand’s big idea in 7 seconds? And then, do you live up to it? Here’s when you need a 7 second pitch: a) In your advertising, it should be the idea line at the end of the TV ad, the billboard ad in Times Square or the button on Facebook. b) Internally, this is the rallying cry to R&D to focus their innovation, to HR on building the culture and to Senior Leaders for how to define the brand to everyone in the company. c) In sales, this is your opening line to the buyer or store manager or the dentist you’re trying to get to recommend your product. d) Even personally, at the start of the job interview, you should lead off with a 7 second pitch that describes yourself (e.g. I’m a marketer that finds growth where others can’t) At Beloved Brands, we believe that you should build everything on your brand around a Big Idea. Consumers want consistency from the brand. Constant changes to the advertising, packaging or delivery can be frustrating to consumers. Leverage a Brand Story and a Big Idea that balances rational and emotional benefits to help establish and build a much tighter relationship. Once you establish your big idea, line up everything under it, including your brand positioning, communication, innovation, in-store and the overall experience you create. So, what is your 7-second big idea for your brand?
  • Trump has used a marketing strategy that started with the love of a few followers, and created a momentum to gather more followers.creating beloved brands 2015x.049 If we use the Brand Love Curve above, Trump entered the race at the Indifferent or Like It stage for most voters, but he had a very small group of core loyal supporters who loved him. He used the Immigration Issue to immediately separate himself from the pack, giving him a tight connection with the “grumpy old men” who love him. Once it created a news story, it allowed Trump to use the Immigration issue to reach others and connect with them–particularly the “disenfranchised Americans” who were indifferent to Trump at first, but have since moved to Like Him or Love Him. The lesson for Marketers: you can leverage your following from those that already love your brand to create an even bigger following. Line ups follow line ups. This has been the strategy for a few populous brands like Apple and Starbucks the past 5-10 years as they’ve shifted from a cool challenger type brand with a core base of artist-type users that love the brand to becoming a mass brand that any demographic or profession can love.
  • Trump’s media execution and leverage of the media has been brilliant (so far). He’s dominated the news media every week. He’s consistently stayed on brand, with very few wobbles. Here’s how I would define the Trump brand character: Trump is that outspoken (loud mouth), strong-willed (over-bearing), highly accomplished (almost pompous) business leader from the opulent days of the 1980’s (the 1%). It will be a challenge for Trump to maintain this type of media execution–as most PR agencies tell you to “be careful”, yet Trump has to be the opposite. He had a post debate wobble when he attacked Fox’s announcer Megyn Kelly. It didn’t really do him any good, but he seems to have gotten past it without much damage. One thing Trump should never do is apologize as it would go against his brand. Voters who are connecting with Trump like his outspoken voice because he is saying what they wish they could say. And if he apologizes they’ll feel bad for thinking exactly what he has already said. Think of it as the “Andrew Dice Clay effect”: He was funny, until he told us he was sorry (and cried) then we felt bad for laughing and then he wasn’t funny anymore.
  • Trump’s entry into the Presidential race has broken every normal rule. For instance, on his recent visit to Iowa, he landed at a state fair in a Helicopter, brought a huge entourage and wore a suit (mind you, he had his baseball cap on). Trump’s rhetoric and style are so different from the usual politicians that his competitors (Jeb Bush or Scott Walker) don’t know how to deal with him. The lesson for Marketers: when you enter a new category, being the rule breaker sets you up as different. The launch of the iPhone was so different that the CEO of Blackberry laughed. When Starbucks launched the $4 latte, coffee competitors had no idea how to react. The launches of Amazon, Netflix and Uber have created such confusion among the incumbent brands, they don’t even know what to do. As you enter a new category, what rules will you break and how will you use that to your advantage?

But can he actually win?

The only way he wins is if he goes mainstream. And if he goes mainstream, the Trump brand will die. Like everyone that enters the race, his obvious brand vision is to win the Presidential election. (Or is it?) As the challenger brand, he’s captured a significant niche of frustrated voters. But while owning a niche is a great brand strategy for gaining share and effectively destroying your competitors, it isn’t enough to achieve your vision of winning the race. At some point, Trump needs to shift to being a mass brand and I’m not yet sure that’s possible. The only way to become mass is to become more mainstream and that risks going completely against the controversial Trump brand he’s created. Won’t a mainstream Trump brand be so watered-down that it would die?

Trump is looking at the wrong data points. He needs to reduce the negatives before focusing on the positives. While Trump keeps telling everyone he’s winning, as his support numbers has grown to 25% of the Republican side of the race, the real number they have to manage is the high 62% of voters who reject Trump, saying they’d never vote for Trump. If he can’t get that number down below 50, he’ll never have a chance to go beyond a novelty act. The issue in this election is that both parties are burdened by high un-likability numbers, with Hillary’s un-approval ratings above 50%. With all these high negatives, maybe all parties might like the idea that they won’t need a voter majority to win.

Can Trump maintain this level of chaos or will the Trump brand eventually fizzle? Trump has shown no signs of reducing the chaos, no signs of going mainstream and no signs of apologizing. That just leaves one alternative: voters get tired of Trump before election day. It’s hard to keep up such a long tenure of organized chaos to stay in the news while avoiding being attacked by the news. Lots of celebrities have tried this and it ended up biting them eventually. The brash “shock humor”  tends to wear out just as fast as it entered. Trump may finally say something so offensive that people want off the bandwagon for fear of association. Can Trump sustain this level of controlled chaos that connects with the disenfranchised voters? Election day is a long way away. My guess is he fizzles.   

Will Trump go third party still?  Every Republican beyond the voters seem to be against Trump, so let’s assume he’ll eventually lose the nomination. With Trump’s ego, he won’t be able to resist going as a third-party candidate.. And if we look to the 1992 results, it’s possible Trump could replicate Ross Perot’s support and get 18% of the vote. While that doesn’t win, it certainly changes the election as the other two will really be playing to see who can get over 41% instead of over 50%. So that brings us back to Trump’s real vision. Does he really want to be President or does he just want to disrupt the election?

Who will save this mess? And for everyone but Trump, this sure is a mess. The first two weeks of a campaign can make or break the candidate. Both Scott Walker and Jeb Bush must be disappointed with their performance, completely over-shadowed by Trump.They also bombed in the debate. Trump may not win the race, but he has possibly destroyed everyone else’s chances of winning. Maybe the next President isn’t even in the race yet?  

Love him or hate him, the Trump brand is fascinating. Many of us are starting to ask “can he actually win?”

To read more on how to create a personal brand, here’s a training workshop we lead with brand leaders around the world:

Also, if you’re interesting in Beloved Brands Training Programs for brand management, feel free to contact us to learn about our one day or three day boot camps for brand leaders. We believe that better leaders make better work which produces better results. Here’s more information.

We make Brands better.

We make Brand Leaders better.™

We offer Brand Coaching, where we promise to make your Brand better by listening to the issues, providing advice that challenges you, and coaching you along a strategic pathway to reaching your Brand’s full potential. For our Brand Leader Training, we promise to make your team of Brand Leaders better, by teaching sound marketing fundamentals and challenging to push for greatness so that they can unleash their full potential. Feel free to add me on Linked In, or follow me on Twitter at @belovedbrands If you need to contact me, email me at graham@beloved-brands.com or phone me at 416 885 39112015x gmr bio.001

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Apple and Google play beautifully in two distinct emotional zones

Here’s a process for how you find your brand’s Emotional Benefit?

To get to that emotional benefit, we recommend that you do up a Customer Value Proposition (CVP) helps to organize your thinking as a great tool for bringing the benefits to life. The tool below is the Beloved Brands Ladder that forces you to ladder up from the consumer insights to the brand features to the rational benefits and finally up to the emotional benefits. Slide09We recommend you hold a brainstorming session with everyone who works on the brand so you can:

    1. Define your consumer target and Brainstorm all of the consumer insights
    2. Match them up against the list of the best features the brand offers.
    3. Find the rational benefit by putting yourself in the shoes of the consumer and seeing the brand features from their eyes: start asking yourself over and over again “so if I’m the consumer, what do I get from that?”.   Ask it five times and you’ll see the answers will get richer and richer each time you ask.
    4. Then find the emotional benefit by asking “so how does that make me feel?”  Ask that five times as well, and you’ll begin to see a deeper emotional space you can play in and own.

This tool is designed to get you out of talking about yourself (your claims) and gets you talking about what the consumer gets (the benefits)  For instance, no one really cares that a golf club has 5.7% more torque.  When you ask what do i get from that, the better answers are longer drives or lower scores or winning a tournament.   These are rational benefits.  When you ask how does that make you feel, the emotional space is confidence and optimism.  This is the emotional benefit.  

The Cheat Sheet for the 8 emotional zones a brand can play in

People tend to get stuck when trying to figure out the emotional benefits. It seems that not only do consumers have a hard time expressing their emotions about a brand, but so do Brand Managers. Companies like Hotspex Research have mapped out all the emotional zones for consumers. I’m not a researcher, but if you’re interested in this methodology contact Hotspex at http://www.hotspex.biz  

Slide10

Leverage this type of research and build your story around the emotions that best fit your consumer needs.  Leveraging the Hotspex work, we’ve mapped out 8 zones in a simplistic way below:

Within each of the zones, you can find emotional words that closely align to the need state of the consumer and begin building the emotional benefits within your CVP.  It almost becomes a cheat sheet for Brand Managers to work with.  How it works is when you figure out which ONE emotional zone you think your brand can own, and just like a rational position, you can’t try to own them all. If we think of the world’s leading  companies, Apple owns Freedom while Google owns Knowledge and they are at their best when they stick to those positioning statements.  

Here’s how Apple plays in the “freedom” emotional space

Here’s how well Apple has brought “Freedom” to life.  You’ll not really hear any functional benefits within this type of Ad.  Poetry matched against the beauty of the world is a perfect demonstration of FREEDOM–making Apple seem interesting, exciting and alive.  

Here’s how Google brings the “knowledge” emotion to life

While knowledge might sound boring, by sticking to that strategy, here’s how well Google has done. Embedded within the story line, Google is used as an enabler of knowledge–making you smarter, wiser and competent.

 

Can you find your brand’s emotional space you want to own?

At Beloved Brands, we run a Brand Leadership Center to train marketers in all aspects of marketing from strategic thinking, analysis, writing brand plans, creative briefs and reports, judging advertising and media. To read more on strategy, here is a workshop on HOW TO GET BETTER ADVERTISING, click on the Powerpoint presentation below:

We make Brands better.

We make Brand Leaders better.™

We offer Brand Coaching, where we promise to make your Brand better by listening to the issues, providing advice that challenges you, and coaching you along a strategic pathway to reaching your Brand’s full potential. For our Brand Leader Training, we promise to make your team of Brand Leaders better, by teaching sound marketing fundamentals and challenging to push for greatness so that they can unleash their full potential. Feel free to add me on Linked In, or follow me on Twitter at @belovedbrands If you need to contact me, email me at graham@beloved-brands.com or phone me at 416 885 39112015x gmr bio.001

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How Ritz-Carlton meets the “unexpressed” needs of consumers

Impeccable service separates Ritz-Carlton

Ritz-Carlton does a lot of things right to earn the high prices they are able to charge–the best locations, beautiful rooms, nice beds and great meals.  But in reality, every luxury hotel has to deliver against these or they’ll be quickly out of business. Recognizing that any great brand has to be better, different or cheaper to win, Ritz-Carlton focuses their attention on impeccable service standards to separate themselves from other Hotels. What Ritz-Carlton has done so well is operationalize it so that culture and brand are one.

I was lucky enough to be able to attend the Ritz-Carlton Training session, and as a Brand Leader, the thing that struck me was the idea of meeting the “unexpressed” needs of guests. As highly paid Marketers, even with mounds of research, we still struggle to figure out what our consumers want, yet Ritz-Carlton has created a culture where bartenders, bellhops and front desk clerks instinctively meet these “unexpressed needs”. Employees carry around note pads and record the expressed and unexpressed needs of every guest and then they use their instincts to try to surprise and delight these guests.

Employees are fully empowered to create unique, memorable and personal experiences for our guests. Unique means doing something that helps to separate Ritz-Carlton from other hotels, memorable forces the staff to do something that truly stands out. And personal is defined as people doing things for other people. Isn’t that what marketers do? So what’s getting in our way?

They bake their values right into the Ritz-Carlton culture

The phrase that Ritz-Carlton uses with their staff is “Radar is on and Antenna is Up” so that everyone can be looking for the unexpressed needs.   These could be small wins that delight consumers in a big way:

  • A couple arrives at the hotel, wife is six months pregnant. Normal service would be to observe and do nothing–at best help with the bags. But at Ritz Carlton, antenna up means they get a special pillow for sleeping and alcohol free sparkling cider instead of champagne.
  • A business guest who was staying at a hotel for 4 weeks and the staff printed up business cards with the guest name, hotel address and phone number so that he could give them out during his stay.

But like any hotel, things do go wrong. The staff is encouraged to use these moments to not only address the problem and fix it but also try to surprise and delight guests turning a problem into a potential wow moment. With everyone’s antenna’s up, when a problem does arise they quickly brainstorm and use everyone’s input.

  • A guest who had just left the hotel called to say that their son had left his stuffed giraffe in the room. The boy could not stop crying. The only thing these distraught parents could think of to tell their son, is that the giraffe was staying on the vacation a little longer. So the staff, found the giraffe and overnighted it to the boy. Most luxury hotels would have done that. But that was not enough for Ritz-Carlton. Knowing what the Mom had told their son about staying on a bit longer, the staff also included a photo album of the giraffe enjoying his extra stay, including photos of the giraffe sitting by the pool, in the spa with cucumbers on his eyes, and laying out on the beach. It’s not that the album would make the boy excited, because he was excited just to have his favorite giraffe back.  But imagine how the parents felt and the signal it sends to them about the Ritz-Carlton staff and how many friends they may share that story with.
  • An activity coordinator noticed that one of them had a real passion for ballet. Over the week, the activity coordinator even came in before her shift every day to give the girl a private ballet class. She wanted to do something special for the young guest, and decided to teach her a special dance for her parents. On their last day, she arranged for a performance at the Jazz Club, with special music and lighting for the performance.  The couple was very grateful and could not believe how much love and passion the activity coordinator had put into making their daughter’s stay so memorable. To complete the experience, they gave the guests a CD with pictures and videos of their daughter’s performance so they could share it with family and friends on their return home

To inspire each other, everyone at Ritz-Carlton goes through a daily line up where they share wow stories, both local stories and stories from other hotels around the world.  This line up keeps everyone in line, but it also keeps people fully engaged. Harvard did a study on Employee Engagement, stating that the average company had 29% of their employees who were fully engaged and they labelled this group as the Super Stars.  Using the same criteria, Ritz-Carlton has 92% of their staff considered fully engaged. No wonder they are able to win so many service awards and no wonder they can create such an experience for their consumers. They’ve fully created a culture that now defines the brand.

So what can brand leaders learn from Ritz-Carlton?

How can marketers challenge themselves to meet the unexpressed needs of guests?  As Henry Ford said:  “”If I had asked people what they wanted, they would have said faster horses.”  So what’s getting in your way?  Are you over-thinking things?  Are you too worried about the short-term results that you’re not even seeing or hearing the unexpressed needs?   Are you so analytical that you need to see the data first and never really reach for your instincts which might challenge the data or even fill in the missing gaps in the data?

How do you get your antenna’s up so that you and your team are always watching, listening and thinking?  As you run from meeting to meeting, filling in forecasting templates and spending evenings pretty-ing up your presentation for senior leaders, how many times a week do you talk to consumers, how many times do you walk into a store or what social media tools do you monitor and listen to. Do you ever sit with customer service for an afternoon?  Do you read through the complaints? And while it’s great that you do this once in a while, how do you operationalize it with your team. Can you set aside time so that you’re doing regular store visits or a quick brainstorm on observations once a week.Slide12

How can marketers push ourselves to wow the consumer?  The Ritz Carlton staff is constantly trying to wow their guests, in either a small or big way believing that both make a difference.  Are you pushing yourself to surprise your consumer?   Are you trying to wow your consumer?   Are you rejecting OK work to force everyone to reach for Great?   Do you have a standard for the work that exceeds that of your consumer, after all if you don’t love the work then how do you expect your consumer to love your brand?

Do something this week that meets the unexpressed needs of a Customer–no matter how big or small–just to see what it feels like.  

It might feel pretty damn powerful.  

We make Brands better.
We make Brand Leaders better.™

We offer Brand Coaching, where we promise to make your Brand better by listening to the issues, providing advice that challenges you, and coaching you along a strategic pathway to reaching your Brand’s full potential. For our Brand Leader Training, we promise to make your team of Brand Leaders better, by teaching sound marketing fundamentals and challenging to push for greatness so that they can unleash their full potential. Feel free to add me on Linked In, or follow me on Twitter at @belovedbrands If you need to contact me, email me at graham@beloved-brands.com or phone me at 416 885 3911

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The delusion of Mergers hurts the brands

6-merger-slide1-304-1M&A (Mergers and Acquisitions) talk around the Kraft-Heinz deal has dominated the business news. For most of us outsiders, it seemed like a surprise. We knew something was up with Heinz after the purchase by 3G Capital private equity group. But for Kraft, it seems like there has already been 30+ years of mergers starting with Kraft and General Foods in 1989, then adding Nabisco and Cadbury only to then split those two companies back out into two separate companies: Kraft and Mondelez. Since the split, the Kraft business is flat, the Mondelez continues to decline, likely both companies hurt by the changing diet of consumers as they cut high fat, high sugar products from their diet.

During my 20 year career, I went through three mergers. Each mergers used a different “merger” rule: one went fast, one went slow and one went clumsy. They say it takes 2 years for a merger to work. From my experience it takes longer.  Prior to the merger, everyone wastes a lot of time speculating what is going to happen, lots of lunch table chit chat and good people leave in anticipation. Headhunters are now pouncing on the people at Kraft. When the merger finally hits, you spend a lot of time on things not related to growing the brands. You have to train senior leaders above you and sales people beside on the “new” brand. Usually, everyone is trying to appear as smart as they can, but in reality for the next year, they ask the most elementary questions. As people jockey for power, some the brightest and best people I’ve ever worked with turn into school children–gossiping, maneuvering, changing their personality to fit in with key people, and some feeling/appearing demoralized and defeated.

Most M&A research studies estimate that the overall failure rate is at least 50 percent. In surveys with executives conducted in recent years, the percentage of companies that failed to reach the goals of the merger was 83 percent. With those statistics known, you would expect leaders to avoid the M&A activity, yet the trend of mergers and acquisitions has been constantly increasing over the past 20 years. Moreover, the number of mergers and acquisitions and the sums of money invested in them have shattered the record almost every year! Even though acquisitions cost billions, the purchase is much easier to do than executing merger. We see the lack of planning, the realization that synergies are not what you expected, the major differences in the culture becomes clear, negotiation assumptions and mistakes prove costly, and quick decisions made impact the overall motivation.

Here’s a list of the top mergers in history

M&A

The reasons most M&A’s happen is the same reason they fail

  • Our business is struggling, their business is doing well: So if your business is struggling, you need a turnaround, not the distraction from a merger. The effort undertaken during a merger will only make your business struggle even more. And you acquired a high growth, which means you’re likely buying high at a price premium. That will be hard for you to realize. This premium is generally so high that even successful management activities after the acquisition do not provide ROI (return on investment) and do not remedy the valuation “error.” The only thing left to do is to cut costs, both in people and marketing usually resulting in the struggling business doing even worse and the newly acquired business starting to flatten out.  
  • Allow us into new markets (new categories, new channels, new geographies). Yes, now your newly merged company will be in new markets, but it doesn’t necessarily translate that your brands will gain easy entry into those markets. At the shelf, retailers may hold your companies share of shelf so that means if you want your new brand in, you have to take out skus of your newly acquired brand. All that means is that as your brand takes time to gain any momentum in the new market it is entering, any gain is offset by a dramatic loss of sales of the brand you took off the shelf. A second risk to entering into markets is the merger may have cost the talent with the knowledge of the new market–and now inexperienced leaders are making decisions about markets they know very little about. With the Heinz-Kraft deal, 60% of Heinz sales are beyond North America, but 2% of Kraft. They have already tried to spin this great myth that this opens up new markets for the old Kraft brands. I want to see them try to sell Velveeta, Jello or Cheez Whiz in France or Italy. Sounds good on the books, but not in reality. 
  • Imagine the power of us together: the size, clout and efficiencies. In a business driven or dominated by retail, that power can certainly help. Where there are large manufacturing or union costs, the efficiency can be leveraged for lower costs. layoff-in-newspaperBut when all you have is efficiency, it becomes obsessive and you look everywhere to cut costs in order to pay off the merger. The first round is easy: close redundant plants and warehouses, eliminate duplicate sales people. And you see results. But since every business must show incremental profit to show the merger a success, the second round of synergies that are harder to show. Now you cut brand support–reduce marketing spend, starting re-organizing teams to reduce people, squeeze suppliers for cost reduction. It can work in the short term, but while the organization becomes obsessive about synergies, who is focused on the growth? If the top-line doesn’t grow,you will eventually run out of places to cut. And becoming this huge conglomerate can make you slow to respond, stodgy, risk-averse and ripe with bureaucracy. This starts to sound like the old Kraft General Foods of the 90s and early 2000s, who closed successful businesses, got rid of some great talent through the years and are known as one of the most risk-averse conglomerates around. My big worry about the new Heinz-Kraft is how to make sure the new company can move with the agility needed in this ever changing marketplace. 
  • We will acquire a technology or expertise we don’t have. At first, it makes sense that you can buy the technology or expertise of your competitor, but likely it comes at a premium with no guarantee for success. If it’s a technology buy, you can certainly use it in your own product since you bought it. But we like to say that brands have four choices:  better, different, cheaper or not around for very long. Now you’ll have both brands appearing almost the same. It’s very challenging to run two brands in one category–I know from experience. The biggest issue is that the two brands start to resemble each other to the point of duplication–if this worked here why won’t it work there. The same technology under the hood, the same distribution strategies and the same ad agency produces similar ads. The best case study for this was when Ford bought Mazda and used identical parts for cars yet tried to appeal to different targets at different price points. On the other case, when you acquire talent, you also acquire a distinct culture you need to make sure you continue. There are many cases where companies purchased an innovative R&D team and failed because that team was mis-managed and lost that innovative spirit. Case in point was Ford’s purchase of Volvo, almost destroying the brand’s spirit of innovation in safety. Both the Volvo and Mazda brands did much better after escaping Ford. Oddly enough, is it any coincidence that the Ford brand is now one of the best performing brands in the market?  It will interesting to see what happens with Apple and Beats by Dre as that deal highly favored Beats, and it’s Apple’s first real attempt at M&A. 
  • Ego Play: Many times the personal interests of senior management are not always aligned with those of the stockholders. The CEO and management team see personal advantages in the merger, such as greater empowerment and control of a larger organization, improvement of the social-management status, and higher salaries and benefits. With wide-eyed optimism, they convince themselves that they can do a better job managing the brands they acquire, they tell themselves they can find more growth and cut costs at the same time. Ego can get in the way of good strategic thinking. Companies can get in bidding wars and corporate ego sees the price get out of hand. They get so deep into the deal, they have to have it–at all costs. In any transaction, when things get emotional the seller wins.
  • Our cultures are a perfect match: Very rarely do we hear this as the primary reason. Yes, we hear it in the press release and at the opening day rally, but as many of us have gone through a few of these, we know that 5 senior leaders meeting 5 other senior leaders and working out a deal is not usually a good indicator that the cultures are a good fit. Even if they say so. Business culture is an odd thing and should not be under-estimated. Usually a merger never allows the due-diligence to find out about whether the cultures fit.  

mergers-acquisitions-22744864Who benefits from Mergers

  • The brands don’t benefit. And the consumer misses out as well. With a distracted company sorting through the merger and trying to make the numbers, it’s usually innovation that gets delayed or cut. With demand for synergies, production costs/warehouse costs likely impacts ingredient choices and freshness options. Sadly, many times the product just isn’t the same as it used to be. 
  • Brand Leaders don’t benefit. They have to re-work and re-work plans for new management. And usually the discussions are a step back in the degree of strategic challenge the first year or two. You get questions like “so tell me how this brand works?” or “have we always done it that way?”.  As synergies happen, we see options like re-structuring the marketing team to group brands together. That means less attention can be paid to each brand or the details beneath. Brand budgets are scrutinized and cut–usually sticking to the safest options in the plan and eliminating creative ideas that that carry risk.  
  • The HR team doesn’t benefit. While they are seen as the “evil group” in a merger, they are usually under the most pressure to cut head count and deliver the bad news, while coincidently being challenged to find a new culture from these two companies that don’t fit nicely together.  This group bears the brunt of the merger. 
  • Shareholders: The statistics show that the shareholders of the seller benefits more than the shareholder of the buyer. Considering, mergers can come out of nowhere fast, this is just a crap shoot as to which company stock you hold. But it really does speak to the premium paid in these deals. As they say in Real Estate, never buy high. 
  • Investment Banks and McKinsey Consulting: At the whim of the leaders, both groups receive huge fees for doing the deal and executing the merger plan. Oddly enough, neither group seems to be at risk or on the hook if the deal or the merger go bad. They just keep moving on to the next deal. 
  • Senior Leaders in the short-term. With the approval to move forward, they increase their status within every touch point–with retailers, with peers, with agencies and in the business community. They likely benefited financially from the merger–either higher salary bump or bonuses. In the longer term, they are on the hot seat to make this deal pay off, and with a 50% failure rate, they likely won’t last. 

Yes mergers are as much of a reality as baseball trades. Like in baseball, managers think we can do more with that asset (brand or player) than they are doing. But more and more, just as the best sports teams are winning because of the organic development of their players, the same holds true for brands. Focus on growing your brands, choosing the right consumer driven strategies and executing with intelligence and passion. Stay focused on your own business instead of drooling over others.  

While the grass always looks greener on the other side of the fence, make sure your own business is in good shape.

 

To see a more in depth presentation please read the powerpoint presentation below which is a Workshop to show brand leaders how to create a beloved brand so they can generate more power and profit for their brand.

We make Brands better.

We make Brand Leaders better.™

We offer Brand Coaching, where we promise to make your Brand better by listening to the issues, providing advice that challenges you, and coaching you along a strategic pathway to reaching your Brand’s full potential. For our Brand Leader Training, we promise to make your team of Brand Leaders better, by teaching sound marketing fundamentals and challenging to push for greatness so that they can unleash their full potential. Feel free to add me on Linked In, or follow me on Twitter at @belovedbrands If you need to contact me, email me at graham@beloved-brands.com or phone me at 416 885 3911

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Top 10 Super Bowl Ads of all time

Slide1I hope a few of these spots bring back some good memories for you and if there are any special ones missing for you, feel free to add them in the comments.  I really hate the latest trend where companies are releasing their ads the week before or for this year, two or three weeks before. Yes, that’s great for sharing on line. But I’ve already seen some of this year’s ads and seeing these ads on a small computer screen, on my own, at random hours isn’t as exciting as seeing them at a Super Bowl party.

As we get ready for this year’s game, here are ten great ads from Super Bowls past. Enjoy.

Coke “Mean Joe Greene” (1979)

Bit of that 1970s “cheese” for you, but I remember this one from my teens.  The spot has become as iconic as the drink itself.  

Apple 1984 (1984)

Great story of this ad in the Steve Jobs book–how the board never wanted to run it and they lied about the media commitment.  This was one of the first big Super Bowl ads, that changed the way advertisers saw the Super Bowl slots.    

McDonald’s Jordan vs Bird (1992)

This one had a lot of break through and left us with the phrase “nothing but net”.  

Cindy Crawford “New Can” (1992)

Not much needs to be said about this one, other than that they repeated this 10 years later and she still looked the same.  

Budweiser: WASSUP! (1999)

The simplicity of this one, but it really does capture a male-bonding insight of how guys do interact with their buddies.  

Snicker’s Betty White (2010)

Whatever Betty was paid, she’s made millions since because of this spot.  Quickly after this one, the power of a Facebook page demanded that Betty host Saturday Night Live.  A great little spot, one that Snicker’s has yet to fully capture in their pool outs on this campaign.   

Chrysler Eminem (2011)

I love the tone of this spot, perfect casting with Eminem–the rawness of his voice, attitude and authenticity.  The repeat in 2012 using Clint Eastwood was a good spot as well, but not quite up to the Eminem version.  “Imported from Detroit” is a very big idea. Love it.  

Budweiser 9/11 Tribute (2002)

Even after all these years, this one might bring a tear to your eye.  Months after the tragedy of 9/11, this one takes the American icons of Budweiser and the Clydesdales marching through the streets of America and gives a nice salute to NYC.  

Google “Parisian”

Beautiful ad that shows the power of Google as an enabling brand to your life.

Ram “farmer”

One of my fav ads of all time, and takes such a huge artistic risk by launching such a quiet ad that really tugs at the heart, when most other brands are doing slapstick ads.

Good luck to this year’s Super Bowl, as many of us will be watching the TV ads as much as we’re watching the game.  The power of the venue as the Super Bowl out draws the final game of the other 3 sports (Baseball, Basketball and Hockey) combined.  

Let’s hope for a great game and maybe one great ad to add to this list.

At Beloved Brands, we run a Brand Leadership Center to train marketers in all aspects of marketing from strategic thinking, analysis, writing brand plans, creative briefs and reports, judging advertising and media. To see a workshop on BRAND STRATEGY, click on the Powerpoint presentation below:

We make Brands better.

We make Brand Leaders better.™

We offer brand coaching, where we promise to make your brand better by listening to the issues, providing advice that challenges you, and coaching you along a strategic pathway to reaching your brand’s full potential. For our brand leader training, we promise to make your team of brand leaders better, by teaching sound marketing fundamentals and challenging to push for greatness so that they can unleash their full potential. Feel free to add me on Linked In, or follow me on Twitter at @belovedbrands If you need to contact me, email me at graham@beloved-brands.com or phone me at 416 885 3911

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